Author Topic: Experiences of depression and anxiety  (Read 170943 times)

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Offline Tisd09

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #75 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 10:37:50 AM »
Doesn't that say a lot to you though? She is going through the most comfortable time in her life but is struggling with depression.

I think the easiest and most common mistake people have with depression is the "what have you got to be depressed about!?" Thing.

I know, I fell into that trap good an proper the 2nd time she 'fell apart'. Apart from the stress I was under in my old job things were going great, she lost the weight she wanted to lose, she just got back from a hen do, she just seemed happy and then bang.

I understand its not as easy as saying what have you got to be depressed about but as someone who hasn't suffered from depression its very difficult to understand the feelings of people who do. My wife, mother, nan & sister have all suffered from it in one form or the other, so I am familiar with it but its so frustrating not to be able to understand it fully. It looks like its a battle my wife and sister especially will be battling the rest of their lifes. What is frustrating is when people blame childhood experiences for depression. I'm sure in some cases its especially relevant but my wife had a great upbringing, never had much money in her family but they were a real tight unit and very supportive of each other, my sister on the otherhand had to go through a bit more. Depression is not a respector of anything or anyone.
"Now who ya gonna run to?"

Offline BlufPurdi

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #76 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 11:02:48 AM »
All the help in the world isn't going to resolve a simple chemical imbalance, though.  The stigma against medication is almost as bad as that of the stigma with depression.
Making mistakes is how you learn.
Every generation must fight the same battles again and again and again. There is no final victory, and there is no final defeat, and so a little bit of history may help.
“What power have you got? Where did you get it from? In whose interests do you exercise it? To whom are you accountable? And how can we get rid of you?” If you cannot get rid of the people who govern you, you do not live in a democratic system.
That is why no one with power likes democracy and that is why every generation must struggle to win it and keep it – including you and me, here and now.

Offline AyeDubbleYoo

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #77 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 11:43:03 AM »
All the help in the world isn't going to resolve a simple chemical imbalance, though.  The stigma against medication is almost as bad as that of the stigma with depression.

Fair point, I think some people are reluctant to be reliant on drugs as they see it as a sign of weakness. FFS, I don't even like to take a paracetomol when I've got a headache.

Offline Tisd09

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #78 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 11:52:46 AM »
All the help in the world isn't going to resolve a simple chemical imbalance, though.  The stigma against medication is almost as bad as that of the stigma with depression.

Fair point, I think some people are reluctant to be reliant on drugs as they see it as a sign of weakness. FFS, I don't even like to take a paracetomol when I've got a headache.

My wife comes from a Church backround and I know some people I know are skeptical about medication. Yet they wouldn't be skeptical if it was heart medicine or insulin. I remember being at a conference before the guy speaking was a devout Christian and he said Christians are great during illness/injury as long as its from the next down. Anything above then its the work of the devil. But one thing that the 2nd hospitalisation proved is that the meds are very important and help regulate the triggers of big 'falls'.

I want to make it clear that I think its very important for sufferers to stick to medication but there is also a need for the sufferer to help themselves. The wife acknowledges this but some days just can't do anything about it and its a battle to get out of bed, even though its almost been three years of her major suffering I still find this part of it difficult to deal with. Not that it would do anything but I do feel like shaking my wife and saying "get a grip" I just wish things were that easy.
"Now who ya gonna run to?"

Offline BlufPurdi

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #79 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 11:54:26 AM »
All the help in the world isn't going to resolve a simple chemical imbalance, though.  The stigma against medication is almost as bad as that of the stigma with depression.

Fair point, I think some people are reluctant to be reliant on drugs as they see it as a sign of weakness. FFS, I don't even like to take a paracetomol when I've got a headache.

Exactly.  It doesn't help that a vast amount of people do get wrongly prescribed, or overly prescribed, medication but there are enough success stories to render that point moot.  Also, a lot of the time people don't give anti-depressants time to work.  They can take anywhere from 3 weeks to 8 weeks to get to the level they need to.  However, in that time you can, and will, take several steps backwards.  When I first took medication I was nauseous constantly, clammy, sweating, disorientated and extremely forgetful.  I considered suicide more in the 4 weeks it to work for me than I had done in the previous year.  This is where the 'turned me into a zombie' myth comes from. 

Once I got to the 4 week stage, though, I was a completely new person.  I couldn't even understand my depression after that, felt like completely alien to me.  It quite simply rebalanced my serotonin levels in a way all the therapy in the world would never do, and never did.
Making mistakes is how you learn.
Every generation must fight the same battles again and again and again. There is no final victory, and there is no final defeat, and so a little bit of history may help.
“What power have you got? Where did you get it from? In whose interests do you exercise it? To whom are you accountable? And how can we get rid of you?” If you cannot get rid of the people who govern you, you do not live in a democratic system.
That is why no one with power likes democracy and that is why every generation must struggle to win it and keep it – including you and me, here and now.

Offline Tisd09

  • General Member
Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #80 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 12:03:47 PM »
Bluf do you consider therapy helpful at all?

With my wife the therapy for the depression side of things doesn't seem to help her much. She also sees a therapist for an eating disorder which came about because of the mental side of thing, she finds those session much more helpful and seems to help on the depression side of things.

We paid for a private therapist last year and it seemed to help her loads, the guy was great, but we turned up to one session when he wanted to see us both only to be told on arrival that he dropped dead of a heart attack hours earlier. She has found it difficult to build up a rapport with anyone else since.
"Now who ya gonna run to?"

Offline BlufPurdi

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #81 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 12:08:57 PM »
I'm in therapy, and I started getting CBT when I was 15.  What I'm doing at the moment is just counselling though, I'm not interested in CBT any more, as I know it inside out.  I accept it can be a success for a lot of people though and should always be the first port of call, but with some it just doesn't work because it's not a matter of cognitive processes.

I'm finding the counselling a good release, but I'm more using it for a chance to get things out to someone not attached to my life as opposed to needing it desperately like some.

It's helpful for others, and what you're saying I agree with, by the way.  I just think there's far too much of a taboo with regards to medication.  Bear in mind I'm talking about anti-depressants and not stuff like diazepam/valium, which I think can be quite bloody dangerous in the wrong hands.
Making mistakes is how you learn.
Every generation must fight the same battles again and again and again. There is no final victory, and there is no final defeat, and so a little bit of history may help.
“What power have you got? Where did you get it from? In whose interests do you exercise it? To whom are you accountable? And how can we get rid of you?” If you cannot get rid of the people who govern you, you do not live in a democratic system.
That is why no one with power likes democracy and that is why every generation must struggle to win it and keep it – including you and me, here and now.

Offline AyeDubbleYoo

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #82 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 12:11:31 PM »
Often thought of starting a conversation club where people meet up and talk about whatever they want in their lives. Seems we don't have meaningful conversations with our friends and family that often nowadays. At least I don't!

Offline Tisd09

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #83 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 12:23:51 PM »
Often thought of starting a conversation club where people meet up and talk about whatever they want in their lives. Seems we don't have meaningful conversations with our friends and family that often nowadays. At least I don't!

Sometimes it is difficult speaking to friends and can be easier speaking with strangers. I'm trying to find some kind of carers club in Swansea but am finding it difficult to find them. I also wouldn't mind being a 'buddy' to a new carer. I didn't have a clue what to do first time around, there seemed to be very little help offered to carers, I've found its something you need to ask for. I think a group like that could be very helpful Ian.
"Now who ya gonna run to?"

Offline AyeDubbleYoo

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #84 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 12:35:02 PM »
Often thought of starting a conversation club where people meet up and talk about whatever they want in their lives. Seems we don't have meaningful conversations with our friends and family that often nowadays. At least I don't!

Sometimes it is difficult speaking to friends and can be easier speaking with strangers. I'm trying to find some kind of carers club in Swansea but am finding it difficult to find them. I also wouldn't mind being a 'buddy' to a new carer. I didn't have a clue what to do first time around, there seemed to be very little help offered to carers, I've found its something you need to ask for. I think a group like that could be very helpful Ian.

I've thought about doing it for ages, especially in London where people tend to only have a handful of friends in their local area and can't talk to strangers for fear of being assumed a weirdo.

It wouldn't have to always be about serious subjects, sometimes just about a film, or politics or what's happening on X Factor. Might look into it more.

CheickMansour

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #85 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 02:02:14 PM »
When I first took medication I was nauseous constantly, clammy, sweating, disorientated and extremely forgetful.  I considered suicide more in the 4 weeks it to work for me than I had done in the previous year. This is where the 'turned me into a zombie' myth comes from. 

You written some really good posts in this thread, but I'm going to have to disagree here, I'm afraid.

The "zombie myth" isn't about what you described above. What it refers to is the "emotional blunting" that some people experience on ADs. Basically, after taking them for a while, you start to lose the ability to feel emotion. Eventually, you reach a stage where nothing really affects you. At this point, life can feel like it's been completely stripped of joy since you can't enjoy or care about anything. It feels pointless.

While ADs can and do help many, there are real side effects. The "zombie effect" does happen - at least, when you use certain ADs (in my case, Paxil).

Offline BlufPurdi

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #86 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 02:07:19 PM »
Fair do's, I did think I would be taken to task on that one.  I stand by my point that a lot of people don't give them a chance to work, though, and get put off by the initial side-effects.
Making mistakes is how you learn.
Every generation must fight the same battles again and again and again. There is no final victory, and there is no final defeat, and so a little bit of history may help.
“What power have you got? Where did you get it from? In whose interests do you exercise it? To whom are you accountable? And how can we get rid of you?” If you cannot get rid of the people who govern you, you do not live in a democratic system.
That is why no one with power likes democracy and that is why every generation must struggle to win it and keep it – including you and me, here and now.

Shaun

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #87 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 02:25:26 PM »
They aren't many side effects. However, there are severe withdrawal symptoms.

Offline Clay

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #88 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 02:33:41 PM »
I've experienced awful side effects on one kind of SSRI and the other two were s****. Honestly think exercise and acceptance is far more powerful than an anti-depressant for me personally. I'd probably find something more suitable but after the head shocks I got getting myself off one of them it's doesn't feel worth it at the moment. That's just me though, I know they're hugely beneficial to others and if I'd give them another shot if I ever started thinking about suicide again.

Diazepam is a different story though, brilliant stuff for nerves but unfortunately you've got little to no chance of getting put on them permanently from any GP's around here, they hate giving them out and tbh.. with how dangerously addictive they're supposed to be, coupled with my extremely addictive personality,  I don't think I'd bother. :lol:

Shaun

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #89 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 03:08:19 PM »
I've experienced awful side effects on one kind of SSRI and the other two were s****. Honestly think exercise and acceptance is far more powerful than an anti-depressant for me personally. I'd probably find something more suitable but after the head shocks I got getting myself off one of them it's doesn't feel worth it at the moment. That's just me though, I know they're hugely beneficial to others and if I'd give them another shot if I ever started thinking about suicide again.

Diazepam is a different story though, brilliant stuff for nerves but unfortunately you've got little to no chance of getting put on them permanently from any GP's around here, they hate giving them out and tbh.. with how dangerously addictive they're supposed to be, coupled with my extremely addictive personality,  I don't think I'd bother. :lol:
All antidepressant are a short-term fix. After a period of time your body builds up a tolerance to them. The doctors just keep upping the dose and giving more and more cocktails.

You're right about cardio exercise, although it's hard sometimes to find the energy to start. Last month I was walking at least twice per day and working out. Hadn't felt that good in years. Now today, I find it an epic struggle just to move from my bed to the living room. I had a panic attack in Tesco Saturday because they have extended the store. Refused to shop there and had to go to Asda.

Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #90 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 03:41:06 PM »
I once had the option to take anti depressants but refused because as I saw it as a quick fix and I knew it was essentially like putting a bandage over a bullet wound.

I recommend anyone to look into meditation if they have problems with negative thoughts etc It's lifechanging.

Shaun

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #91 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 04:11:04 PM »
They are over prescribed. I kept denying I was depressed.

Stephen927

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #92 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 05:23:05 PM »
I think I'd get diagnosed with depression if I went to the doctors like. I lean heavily towards the negative in a lot of situations, I have passing thoughts on suicide that I'd never act out, I often long to just lie in bed all day rather than doing anything proactive, and I sometimes get really snappy and hurtful to those around me. I wouldn't consider myself depressed at all tbh but thinking about it I probably suffer from it in some degree.


Offline Stu

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #93 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 05:30:00 PM »
Quote
Bipolar disorder is a condition in which people experience abnormally elevated (manic or hypomanic) and, in many cases, abnormally depressed states for periods of time in a way that interferes with functioning. Not everyone's symptoms are the same, and there is no simple physiological test to confirm the disorder. Bipolar disorder can appear to be unipolar depression. Diagnosing bipolar disorder is often difficult, even for mental health professionals. What distinguishes bipolar disorder from unipolar depression is that the affected person experiences states of mania and depression. Often bipolar is inconsistent among patients because some people feel depressed more often than not and experience little mania whereas others experience predominantly manic symptoms. Additionally, the younger the age of onset—bipolar disorder starts in childhood or early adulthood in most patients—the more likely the first few episodes are to be depression.[6] Because a bipolar diagnosis requires a manic or hypomanic episode, many patients are initially diagnosed and treated as having major depression.

Offline cp40

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #94 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 05:42:52 PM »
It appears to me, Stu theres not two cases the same and pinning a name on it is an attempt to put treatment in right direction. Followed by a lot of trial and error with each patient.

Offline Cajun

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #95 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 06:39:17 PM »
Went to see a therapist recently which was excellent, did CBT which was interesting but like Bluf didn't find it overly helpful in the end. It was just pointing out the obvious without really offering a solution.

Was referred to a psychiatrist who in all honesty should be struck off, they were absolutely useless and set me back massively.

I do kind of feel I have nowhere to go now so just have to try and deal with things my own way.

Offline wacko

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #96 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 06:39:17 PM »
I think I'd get diagnosed with depression if I went to the doctors like. I lean heavily towards the negative in a lot of situations, I have passing thoughts on suicide that I'd never act out, I often long to just lie in bed all day rather than doing anything proactive, and I sometimes get really snappy and hurtful to those around me. I wouldn't consider myself depressed at all tbh but thinking about it I probably suffer from it in some degree.

You've just described me to a T. I'm guessing your passing thoughts of suicide are of the "what if I weren't here any more" variety, not the "I can't stand another second of this" kind.

Depression, like most such things, is a sliding scale, and this is way short of what professionals mean by "depression".
Just realized you aren't Dave, dick. Now I gotta actually do s***.

Offline cubaricho

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #97 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 06:51:15 PM »
All the help in the world isn't going to resolve a simple chemical imbalance, though.  The stigma against medication is almost as bad as that of the stigma with depression.

Have to agree.  There were two distinct periods of my life growing up - the one before my mom started taking meds and the time after she started taking meds.  Luckily for her it worked a charm and after many years of being on medication she actually could go very long periods of time (months to years) without having to take medication because it had changed the chemicals so well.

I think meds are a great way to go if the depression/chemical imbalance is severe enough, as it changed my life when growing up in a household affected by clinical depression.

Stephen927

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #98 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 06:58:39 PM »
I think I'd get diagnosed with depression if I went to the doctors like. I lean heavily towards the negative in a lot of situations, I have passing thoughts on suicide that I'd never act out, I often long to just lie in bed all day rather than doing anything proactive, and I sometimes get really snappy and hurtful to those around me. I wouldn't consider myself depressed at all tbh but thinking about it I probably suffer from it in some degree.

You've just described me to a T. I'm guessing your passing thoughts of suicide are of the "what if I weren't here any more" variety, not the "I can't stand another second of this" kind.

Depression, like most such things, is a sliding scale, and this is way short of what professionals mean by "depression".

More the latter, tbh.

Offline madras

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Re: Experiences of depression and anxiety
« Reply #99 on: Tuesday 29 November 2011, 10:44:37 PM »
I think I'd get diagnosed with depression if I went to the doctors like. I lean heavily towards the negative in a lot of situations, I have passing thoughts on suicide that I'd never act out, I often long to just lie in bed all day rather than doing anything proactive, and I sometimes get really snappy and hurtful to those around me. I wouldn't consider myself depressed at all tbh but thinking about it I probably suffer from it in some degree.


doesn't everyone ?
Bullshitters misrepresent themselves to their audience not as liars do, that is, by deliberately making false claims about what is true. In fact, bullshit need not be untrue at all.

Rather, bullshitters seek to convey a certain impression of themselves without being concerned about whether anything at all is true. They quietly change the rules governing their end of the conversation so that claims about truth and falsity are irrelevant.