Author Topic: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space  (Read 80858 times)

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Offline robm

  • General Member
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #1725 on: Thursday 23 January 2020, 06:55:30 PM »
Anybody seen what i assume are the starlink satellites?  Looks really weird a line of lights tracking across the sky tonight. Cool as f***.

Offline loki679

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Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #1726 on: Monday 3 February 2020, 07:15:17 PM »
This is pretty cool.  Makes me wonder if a solar system could survive that experience intact.

Quote
Astronomers have spotted an ultrafast star, traveling at a blistering 6 million km/h, that was ejected by the supermassive black hole at the heart at the Milky Way five million years ago.

The discovery of the star, known as S5-HVS1, was made by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Physics Sergey Koposov as part of the Southern Stellar Stream Spectroscopic Survey (S5). Located in the constellation of Grus -- the Crane -- S5-HVS1 was found to be moving ten times faster than most stars in the Milky Way.

"The velocity of the discovered star is so high that it will inevitably leave the galaxy and never return," said Douglas Boubert from the University of Oxford, a co-author on the study.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191112110238.htm
Comfy chairs, beer, and doom. Humanity's future is an early 90s LAN party.

Offline OCK

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Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #1727 on: Tuesday 4 February 2020, 05:26:53 PM »
Might book a ticket if it passes by.

Offline loki679

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Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #1728 on: Monday 10 February 2020, 02:36:34 PM »
So.............aliens?

Quote
Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are bright, millisecond-duration radio transients originating from extragalactic distances. Their origin is unknown. Some FRB sources emit repeat bursts, ruling out cataclysmic origins for those events. Despite searches for periodicity in repeat burst arrival times on time scales from milliseconds to many days, these bursts have hitherto been observed to appear sporadically, and though clustered, without a regular pattern. Here we report the detection of a 16.35±0.18 day periodicity from a repeating FRB 180916.J0158+65 detected by the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment Fast Radio Burst Project (CHIME/FRB). In 28 bursts recorded from 16th September 2018 through 30th October 2019, we find that bursts arrive in a 4.0-day phase window, with some cycles showing no bursts, and some showing multiple bursts, within CHIME's limited daily exposure. Our results suggest a mechanism for periodic modulation either of the burst emission itself, or through external amplification or absorption, and disfavour models invoking purely sporadic processes.

https://arxiv.org/abs/2001.10275
Comfy chairs, beer, and doom. Humanity's future is an early 90s LAN party.