Author Topic: The photo thread  (Read 636062 times)

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Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12050 on: Thursday 18 February 2021, 01:09:21 PM »
Been sent an RX10 rather than an RX100 after returning the 100 for a cracked bottom plate.  Not mad with that and will call it fate and see how I do, I haven't used one for a good couple of years.  It suffers from the same misfortune that the recently returned FZ1000 does (zoom makes me very lazy) but there's not as much reach here, only 24-200mm (f2.8 constant, which is nice), so less potential for lazy just-stand-where-you-are-and-shoot.  I remember loving the camera a lot but it being slow and unfriendly to operate compared to the Panasonic (that's Sony for you) while having a couple of distinct advantages of its own - the image quality is considerably better, more aperture choice, and it's a tiny bit smaller :)

A couple of random choices from my past RX10s.  They're really versatile cameras.























Love that last one [emoji38]  I've never seen somebody so awkwardly looking after his gear sat on Northumberland Street thinking he was going to get jumped any second [emoji38]

Offline Infinitely Content

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12051 on: Thursday 18 February 2021, 01:19:27 PM »
The lady crossing the road and the distant pathway with out of focus foreground are my favourites. The latter reminds me of Hamish Fulton whom we've talked about in the past  :)
Your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes.

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12052 on: Thursday 18 February 2021, 01:33:49 PM »
Aye, that was one of the few occasions that I thought a road was worth getting a shot of before that sort of thing was more vindicated in my mind. In retrospect I wish I'd closed the aperture a bit and got the foreground slightly more in focus, but I'd just been up Ben Macdui and was about to make a start on Cairn Gorm and my tiredness made me lazy. Will go back and take it again when we're allowed out again :)

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12053 on: Saturday 20 February 2021, 06:18:49 PM »
Ah, motherfucker



Back it goes :) only the second or third time I've ever seen fungus in a modern lens

Offline O'Neill

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12054 on: Saturday 20 February 2021, 07:24:27 PM »
Usually find when that's the case that there is plenty moisture inside as well.

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12055 on: Saturday 20 February 2021, 07:28:58 PM »
Aye, I'm assuming all those little wet looking dots are new bits starting as well (although they're very regular and may be a reflection of the light). Shame, was in canny nick other than that. I used a Sigma 24mm manual focus lens that had a lot more and it didn't appear to make a lot of difference to the image but it must cause loss of contrast at least.
« Last Edit: Saturday 20 February 2021, 08:51:57 PM by OpenC »

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12056 on: Sunday 21 February 2021, 06:47:49 PM »









Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12057 on: Sunday 21 February 2021, 08:14:36 PM »
:thup:

Now awaiting a copy of How I Take Photographs by Daido Moriyama :aww:

(well, by somebody else but about Daido)

Do let me know how it is, I'd be interested in picking that up too. I don't know a lot about him other than that his high contrast B&W photos are some of the best out there in that style and that I like his approach to photography in general (some good videos on youtube of his 'process'... basically just being followed around whilst doing his thing, sure you've seen them).

The influence of him in some of your street stuff is quite clear (in a good way)  :)

@Infinitely Content

I've read this a few times now.  There's not a huge amount to read, just five or six short essays/conversations.

It's not filled with his absolute finest work (although I really love the yin/yang feel of the image on the cover, as below, and there's a lot of interesting images in there), but it is recognisably his style and worth having around since it's a cheap little book. It's a fairly small volume and unfortunately it's bound in one of those styles where you feel that if you open the spine enough to look at the two page spread images properly, the pages will start to fall out.  It's nice to be able to have one of his books, though (although it's co-written).



He's an interesting bloke - he's not deliberately self-effacing but at the same time he's not over the top with what he's looking for or how he does what he does.  I watched a documentary about him where he came across very similar - he's almost the anti-photographer; doesn't think too hard about what he's doing, doesn't feel that photographs can or should be copyrighted, upfront about blasting off thousands and thousands of frames in order to get some good ones.  Most of it was a bit of validation for me because his style is very much like my own - if you find it interesting, you should quickly take a picture of it (and that's where having a camera which makes the job easy is so great).

There are a few passages which particularly resonated - not because they were things I wasn't already doing, but more because I hadn't given them the appropriate weight in terms of the way I approach it.  This sort of thing:


"I'm a little unorthodox in my views.  I've always said that photographers should put aside 'concepts' or 'themes' when they go out on a shoot.  Of course I understand that young people want to have a conceptual basis for their work - I was the same way, starting out.  But even in my earliest photographs, the collection titled Yokosuka for example, I knew I wanted to take pictures of Yokosuka but I had no agenda - I never thought to myself, 'right, I'm going to explore the political tensions in Yokosuka', or anything like that.  I just thought, 'I'll go and shoot some pictures'.  I felt no different when I later went to Shinjuku, or Buenos Aires, or Hawaii [...] The photographer should just shoot whatever he observes, using all his senses, and if possible unselectively"

"The only way you can ensure that a shot will ever be at all meaningful is if you take it.  Don't think about it too hard before hand, don't be too self-conscious or rational - just press the shutter button.  There'll be all the time in the world for other people to come along later and attach whatever implications or 'meaning' they like to it"


It's worth having for the sake of a tenner, but it's not a classic coffee table photography book.

Also made me think, as Asian street photography always does, how much is added to street shots from that part of the world by the way the written language looks.  I often wonder to myself whether our witless and terrible adverts plastered all over our otherwise great looking streets look as appealing to eastern street photography eyes as theirs look to ours.  I suspect not :lol:  There's just something inherently artistic about writing in Asia which we don't have in Europe, ours still looks like Viking runes by comparison alas.

Offline Infinitely Content

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12058 on: Sunday 21 February 2021, 08:28:59 PM »
:thup: Thanks man  :)

I think it's because of the logographic style of the characters. They're essentially images in their own right. I found the same when I was photographing in Belarus. Cyrillic letters (whilst not as fluid as brushstroke like as kanji/mandarin) have an iconographic look and a general alien feel to them that brought something to images. Where as oftentimes I'm trying to avoid lettering as much as possible in the UK unless there's an interesting contradiction or harmony between the words and the subject. I wondered if its just my familiarity with the English language that causes it, but similarly to you I think not, rather there's something more beautiful about Hazni/Kanji/Cyrillic characters that enhance certain styles of street photography in particular.

Your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes.

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12059 on: Friday 26 February 2021, 05:04:09 PM »








Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12060 on: Yesterday at 05:48:01 PM »
Same walk around Rothbury moors round Simonside way, different camera.  I always feel like I'm channeling my inner Wibble these days when I go out in the country; I like his sense of subject and I feel like it's something I always missed in my landscape stuff.  I always end up coming back with trees and posts, though :lol:  My Northumbrian landscape is like his in many ways, but Wibble's has a human influence which mine largely misses alas (or where it is there, it feels like it was there 50 years ago and has long since departed).



























All with the X100F that I've still got here.  I like the camera more and more - although its clinical rendering still bothers me a bit, everything else about it is a huge step up on the S and T.  I don't know if it's got a slightly iffy shutter button, though, or if I just spent so long with a hair trigger Canon 6D that I'd forgotten that you need to give Fuji shutters a firmer push to fire them.  That is my memory - whenever I went back to an X100S or T from another camera I always spent my first street photography session finding that I hadn't pressed hard enough to trip the shutter - but there's something just not quite right about this one.  It's never missed a shot when I've actively thought "push the button properly", but when I do that squeeze that you sometimes have to do, it sometimes feels like it trips at a different place - like it gets to the end of its travel but occasionally I have to push it a bit harder than I thought I would.

Today was the first day when I found an X100 at the limits of its exposure, trying to shoot at f2 even with the ND filter on, 1/1000th was too slow to keep some shots as dark as I wanted them.  They were all recoverable in post, but I've never experienced that before.  I remembered when I got home that it's got an electronic shutter and I really should have just used that, but you live and learn :lol:
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 05:59:36 PM by OpenC »

Offline wibble

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12061 on: Yesterday at 08:15:04 PM »
lol, 'inner Wibble' - I see a lot of similarities in our landscape stuff (having been inspired by you in the first place).   I'm taking an awful lot of pics of trees these days while I try to find different subjects on my regular trails.  Mind, the trees are ancient, moss-covered things, so they do make for some interesting shots.





Just a point about the X-H1 - the shutter button is unusual for a Fuji in being a hair-trigger, and it's an absolute joy to use.  That plus the shutter sound (has to be heard to be appreciated) just makes you want to take more pictures.



« Last Edit: Yesterday at 09:02:16 PM by wibble »

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12062 on: Yesterday at 09:01:03 PM »
I used to love the shutter sound of the original 5D, it sounds absolutely brilliant :) the 6D was just a muffled clunk by comparison, a lot more discreet but much less satisfying.

I think I'll send this F back as faulty but get another one; just don't quite trust the button enough and I don't want it to fail altogether when I go out of warranty. They're wonderful little cameras and although 35mm is a bit tight for my liking these days, it's generally solved by stepping back about three feet (if I can).
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 09:15:29 PM by OpenC »

Offline Disco

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12063 on: Yesterday at 11:16:41 PM »

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12064 on: Yesterday at 11:20:14 PM »
That's the bottom end of Glen Coe (the end with Loch Achtriochtan) looking back South, you can see the road but I hid the big car parks behind the stand of trees :)  There's a footpath leading to Bidean nam Bian, which is where I was headed, just over the road bridge at this end of the glen.  The mountains on that side of the glen are only famous in mountaineering circles (the legendary Aonach Eagach); it's not as scenic or famous as the ones on the West of the glen but it looked just right then :)

Offline Disco

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12065 on: Yesterday at 11:29:51 PM »
Ah really? Was on said road only in September and I’d never have guessed. Amazing what a slight change in angle and bit of clear sky can do. Hoping to get back up there and beyond this summer again.

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12066 on: Yesterday at 11:33:27 PM »
Aye, it looks different every day.  As I say, I suspect it's also that your eyes are always drawn to the Three Sisters of Bidean nam Bian on the other side, which are much more spectacular.  The side I got there is just a big mountain wall, it's only the very top of it that's interesting.  The angle helps as well, you're right - the glen is wider from where I got the shot than it feels when you drive through it - the whole thing feels really hemmed in, which it doesn't look here.

It's pretty desolate and pretty remote but Glen Torridon is the most spectacular part of mainland Scotland imo, well worth a look and not too distant if you're anywhere near Aviemore / Inverness.  Don't tell anybody about it, though :shifty: Couple of hours drive from there.  Skye is obviously phenomenal but it gets so busy when it's not February :anguish:

Offline Disco

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12067 on: Yesterday at 11:39:30 PM »
Aye, it looks different every day.  As I say, I suspect it's also that your eyes are always drawn to the Three Sisters of Bidean nam Bian on the other side, which are much more spectacular.  The side I got there is just a big mountain wall, it's only the very top of it that's interesting.  The angle helps as well, you're right - the glen is wider from where I got the shot than it feels when you drive through it - the whole thing feels really hemmed in, which it doesn't look here.   

Definitely. Especially with the road being on that side of the Glen I suppose it’s only natural but when you’re looking back over towards it particularly with the Glen in between it looks absolutely fantastic particularly here with the clouds flowing over the top as you’ve captured.

Having read your edit: sounds good but initial planning is to go up centrally through Perth, Pitlochry, Aviemore etc and then loop back down the west coast taking in Skye, Glencoe and back towards Glasgow.

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12068 on: Yesterday at 11:41:38 PM »

cheers :thup:  It's hard to take bad pictures there, of course.

You should see it from the top



Not my picture.  My hands were shaking too much for pictures when I was up there, and I didn't even try to go across it :lol:

Offline Disco

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12069 on: Yesterday at 11:44:32 PM »
:lol: :lol: don’t blame you at all. 

Offline OpenC

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Re: The photo thread
« Reply #12070 on: Today at 05:03:11 PM »
Nothing fancy, just trying to keep in practice.  X100F.  I now think the shutter is alright and it was just me not pressing it properly [emoji38]