Author Topic: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium  (Read 11179 times)

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Offline HTT

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #300 on: Wednesday 31 October 2018, 10:43:18 pm »
All travel through the air gives me major anxiety. I properly inspect the plane when I'm boarding looking for loose nuts or anything. Grim.

Landing I’m OK, 36000 ft up in a straight line I’m OK. It’s the whole buildup to take off and then take off I’m not fine with. Or any sudden turns or noises. I scan the faces of the stewards for signs of concern and I find comfort in seeing others just as scared as I am.

Take off though, it’s the whole rumble as the engines fire up, the slingshot trajectory down the tarmac from a standstill  and then when it leaves the tarmac that whole sense of for me a weightlessness beneath you, the rattling, shakes and noise combined and then the climb skywards until it’s up in the air straight, it scares the s*** out of me and I don’t like it at all, it’s horrible.

I think being cramped, fearful of heights and the sheer complexity of aviation also doesn’t help me. A few years back I think I managed 14 or so flights in one year and thought I’d gotten over it because I was flying so much and so regularly.

Not even a few whiskies helps. The relief when we land though, that’s a good feeling.

This 100 percent. The noises freak me out to an insane degree. I'm always thinking "is that normal, should it be making that noise"

I assume that stance with a lot of things, condensation on the inside of the window? It’s cracked and I’m gonna be sucked out. Cabin crew going into the cockpit? Something is wrong. I take my seat and the first thing I think about is whether I’m better off in that seating area or somewhere else if we go down. It’s f***ing horrible and tortured me. My poor wife and kids and those new me yesterday, grumpy, snappy, irritated, on edge. It’s irrational I know and the likelihood of anything happening is lottery winning odds, but the whole experience puts me at an emotional, physical and mental unease that I can’t control or bare at times. I’ve cried on take off, I’ve had a panic attack, I’ve actually used another mode of transport despite having a flight booked bruise I’ve had bad thoughts about it, I’ve done that several times. It’s privablg prevented me from traveling the world over and I love traveling to different places and it will no doubt limit my kids’ experience abroad when it comes to traveling to certain places or how we travel if I’m with them.

I’m the same as you HTT. Have to take medication if I’m going to fly :lol:

When I flew to Kenya last year, 3 flights, 16 or so hours in total, almost a full day of airports and flying, my sis in law gave me some tablets, tremodol or something and something else, she said one was to calm me in terms of loosening up and relaxing physically and the other to make me sleep better, I necked them and some calmers over a few hours and drank about 4 double whiskies before and some whiskey on board, it helped a bit but I still couldn’t sleep and was wrecked by the time I got to Mombasa, I was like a zombie for days. I didn’t like that feeling.

Did the same a few months back going to Benidorm too and a few of my mates thought I was on coke or something because I was so out of it, I slept most of the way thankfully and felt fresh as a daisy once landing. I only had a pint at the airport before we boarded though.

I don’t like taking tablets full stop because of any effects afterwards so nowadays I just have a whiskey before and two mini bottles straight on the flight for short flights.

I actually prefer longer flights than short flights but I hate having to fly multiple times in one day, it destroys me and I can’t explain how I feel. It’s like I’m losing control of my mind and control over my body and again that’s what terrifies me more than the actual flying once landed and thinking about it. I really do believe it’s all in the head though and mind over matter and that this fear of mine can be undone and that I alone can do a lot to help myself with this, myself.

I hope so anyway because it troubles me how debilitating it is physically, emotionally and mentally just how this flying thing is alone or has become, it’s abnormal behaviour by me and not me in every way in terms of how I am otherwise, if flying can do that to me, what else or what next as I get older and with a family?

Someone recommended sky diving to me and I know people who have done that to combat their fear and it’s had a positive effect, but I honesty think I’d have a heart attack mid-air or something. No chance.

I’d love to just have no fears though and to even enjoy it which I kind of have done a few times, but always on edge. I know they are kids of course so wired differently to us adults, but I look at my boys and how excited they are to get on a plane and by the whole experience and I want to share that with them rather than sit there like the world is going to end and actually detract from their fun by not even being unable to pretend I’m enjoying the ride or happy to be sat next to them or anyone.

Again my poor son getting to meet the pilots and I just wanted off the plane, I don’t think he even got to ask them any questions and I’m sure they thought I was rude, I know I was in terms of my attitude. If it was the cockpit of a Ferrari you couldn’t drag me away from it.

I’ve probably got 2 more flights before Xmas so I’m gonna try and do something about my fear other than grim and bear it somehow because next year my wife wants us to go back to Kenya and this time fly out together as she struggled badly with luggage and the boys over 3 flights and almost a full day at airports last year.

I went separately 2 weeks later into their month stay due to work and took my brother with me to hold my hand. We all flew back together and my fear she said made it just as unbearable for them as me and I was kind of like that coming back from Tunisia last night and going to it. I also want to not feel so anxious, sweat so much and have the kind of panic attacks I’ve had in the past because it’s awful. I’d rather sit in pain with a broken lefg or something than experience all that time and time again.
« Last Edit: Wednesday 31 October 2018, 10:56:15 pm by HTT »
Wee Hughie - the greatest centre-forward Newcastle United ever had

Offline LoveItIfWeBeatU

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #301 on: Wednesday 31 October 2018, 11:53:39 pm »
People who are terrified of flying telling others their misinformation about how helicopters work.

Statistically you're far more likely to die in a car than a plane or helicopter. I'll accept it's probably more terrifyingly to imagine dying in an air crash than a car crash.

There's a reason aircraft crashes make the news and car crashes rarely do. Air crashes are rare where as people die in car crashes frequently.
Thier is not a word. "Their" is the correct spelling.

Win, Lose or Draw. NOT "Loose"!

Offline Away Toon

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #302 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 01:23:11 am »
One of the girls I worked with was in a small two person helicopter that crash landed in Florida firstly onto a house roof and then they slid off onto a parked car, both her and the pilot walked out virtually untouched. Two weeks before I was up in the same chopper with the same pilot sight seeing over Fort Lauderdale. Never again, I just don't believe they are safe and when they go wrong that's normally it. As someone said earlier flying in planes is alright, it's boring though and unless you can afford to fly in the front it's a pretty horrible experience now.
Modern Capitalism: Giving arseholes self esteem since 1850

Offline HTT

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #303 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 01:56:56 am »
More cars on the road, operated by people and not computers etc. so of course more accidents. I’d fancy my chances more in a car crash than a plane crash. Your are right though, statistically it’s very safe flying, safer than driving. The stats are skewed though.

Me if I’m driving, I feel I’d have to be driving dangerously recklessly or not paying enough attention to be involved in a crash which is the cause of most crashes. That or falling asleep at the road.

If you keep a safe distance, don’t zoom in and out of lanes constantly, over speed at daft speeds and read the road ahead and constantly scan lanes for cars coming in or leaving the chances of being involved in an accident with another vehicle is so low the bookies wouldn’t even give odds.

Even bad weather shouldn’t increase the risk if you apply those things to your own driving, you can’t legislate for other drivers of course or blow outs but it’s usually your own errors/driving style that either causes you to have an accident or involves you in one.

Most accidents are not fatal either.

I done a speeding course a few years back and according to one of the instructors who was an ex traffic cop the risk of serous injury and even death in a car crash inceases massively if you’re not wearing seat belts (no s***) for example and can even be the result of things on the parcel shelf or dash hitting you and even your steering wheel position on adjust or how your head rest is adjusted.

He also said the position of the front wheels can dictate so much influence. He said at a junction for example if you are turning say right don’t turn your wheels right until you move off but keep them straight because if someone hits you from behind at speed and with such force it could push your car into a spin which makes it almost certain you will lose control of the car or push it into traffic also turning. He also said it’s best to put your hand brake on and keep your foot on the foot brake if you are stationary for more than 30 seconds.

I dunno like and actually said regardless if someone hits you hard and at speed you’re not going to have a firm grip of the steering on impact or be able to jolt into some kind of subversive action anyway and if the handbrake is on will that make any impact more forceful and he said it’s all about minimising the risk and the practice of safer driving habits and that’s what I took away from the course and try and bear in mind at all times when driving anyway even though I thought some of what he said didn’t make sense or couldntbstatsically be proven to be advantageous or not.

Mind I’m talking about the motorways, on normal roads and country lanes especially it doesn’t matter how vigilant you are if someone is tear around a bend or texting at the wheel approaching red lights and bump into you.

Driving in high winds scares me when driving our vans because it can tip you over and although I know what to do if a gust of wind hits you so hard it it lifts wheels off tarmac, and it’s happened to me thousands of times and I kid you not f***ing scary, if it catches you sweet you’re going over no matter what. Heavy fog scares me as well. I either won’t go out at all or pull over.

Snow and ice doesn’t bother me in terms of my own driving, but others... no matter how good a driver you are or how safe you are in such conditions its not worth it at times when so many don’t know how to drive in such conditions or don’t drive to the conditions and thereore become a danger to you regardless.

Anyayway cars and the roads all day over planes and the skies.
Wee Hughie - the greatest centre-forward Newcastle United ever had

Offline LoveItIfWeBeatU

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #304 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 08:14:47 am »
One of the girls I worked with was in a small two person helicopter that crash landed in Florida firstly onto a house roof and then they slid off onto a parked car, both her and the pilot walked out virtually untouched. Two weeks before I was up in the same chopper with the same pilot sight seeing over Fort Lauderdale. Never again, I just don't believe they are safe and when they go wrong that's normally it. As someone said earlier flying in planes is alright, it's boring though and unless you can afford to fly in the front it's a pretty horrible experience now.
As explained by others, there is something called autorotation which helicopters can do when there is a loss of power. It's not true to say you're doomed if anything goes wrong. If there is a catastrophic failure (e.g the tail rotor fails) then your chances of survival are greatly reduced but how often does that happen? Not very often. If any aircraft fails it's thoroughly investigated to find out what happened and lessons are learned and rules regarding checking and replacing parts are inforced. Are private helicopters statistically less safe than a commercial aeroplane? Yes but they're not the death trap some of you fear them to be. There are millions of air hours being flown without incident. Saying "I don't believe them to be safe" is your personal fears talking rather than statistical fact.

HTT, you have experience in driving cars. You don't have experience in flying apart from as a passenger and you've already said you're a nervous passenger. I've already said the idea of dying in an air accident is worse than the idea of dying in a car crash. Just like being eaten by a shark is worse than the statistically far more likely falling down the stairs and dying as a result.
Thier is not a word. "Their" is the correct spelling.

Win, Lose or Draw. NOT "Loose"!

Offline LV

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #305 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 08:38:05 am »
All travel through the air gives me major anxiety. I properly inspect the plane when I'm boarding looking for loose nuts or anything. Grim.

Landing I’m OK, 36000 ft up in a straight line I’m OK. It’s the whole buildup to take off and then take off I’m not fine with. Or any sudden turns or noises. I scan the faces of the stewards for signs of concern and I find comfort in seeing others just as scared as I am.

Take off though, it’s the whole rumble as the engines fire up, the slingshot trajectory down the tarmac from a standstill  and then when it leaves the tarmac that whole sense of for me a weightlessness beneath you, the rattling, shakes and noise combined and then the climb skywards until it’s up in the air straight, it scares the s*** out of me and I don’t like it at all, it’s horrible.

I think being cramped, fearful of heights and the sheer complexity of aviation also doesn’t help me. A few years back I think I managed 14 or so flights in one year and thought I’d gotten over it because I was flying so much and so regularly.

Not even a few whiskies helps. The relief when we land though, that’s a good feeling.

This 100 percent. The noises freak me out to an insane degree. I'm always thinking "is that normal, should it be making that noise"

I assume that stance with a lot of things, condensation on the inside of the window? It’s cracked and I’m gonna be sucked out. Cabin crew going into the cockpit? Something is wrong. I take my seat and the first thing I think about is whether I’m better off in that seating area or somewhere else if we go down. It’s f***ing horrible and tortured me. My poor wife and kids and those new me yesterday, grumpy, snappy, irritated, on edge. It’s irrational I know and the likelihood of anything happening is lottery winning odds, but the whole experience puts me at an emotional, physical and mental unease that I can’t control or bare at times. I’ve cried on take off, I’ve had a panic attack, I’ve actually used another mode of transport despite having a flight booked bruise I’ve had bad thoughts about it, I’ve done that several times. It’s privablg prevented me from traveling the world over and I love traveling to different places and it will no doubt limit my kids’ experience abroad when it comes to traveling to certain places or how we travel if I’m with them.

I’m the same as you HTT. Have to take medication if I’m going to fly :lol:

When I flew to Kenya last year, 3 flights, 16 or so hours in total, almost a full day of airports and flying, my sis in law gave me some tablets, tremodol or something and something else, she said one was to calm me in terms of loosening up and relaxing physically and the other to make me sleep better, I necked them and some calmers over a few hours and drank about 4 double whiskies before and some whiskey on board, it helped a bit but I still couldn’t sleep and was wrecked by the time I got to Mombasa, I was like a zombie for days. I didn’t like that feeling.

Did the same a few months back going to Benidorm too and a few of my mates thought I was on coke or something because I was so out of it, I slept most of the way thankfully and felt fresh as a daisy once landing. I only had a pint at the airport before we boarded though.

I don’t like taking tablets full stop because of any effects afterwards so nowadays I just have a whiskey before and two mini bottles straight on the flight for short flights.

I actually prefer longer flights than short flights but I hate having to fly multiple times in one day, it destroys me and I can’t explain how I feel. It’s like I’m losing control of my mind and control over my body and again that’s what terrifies me more than the actual flying once landed and thinking about it. I really do believe it’s all in the head though and mind over matter and that this fear of mine can be undone and that I alone can do a lot to help myself with this, myself.

I hope so anyway because it troubles me how debilitating it is physically, emotionally and mentally just how this flying thing is alone or has become, it’s abnormal behaviour by me and not me in every way in terms of how I am otherwise, if flying can do that to me, what else or what next as I get older and with a family?

Someone recommended sky diving to me and I know people who have done that to combat their fear and it’s had a positive effect, but I honesty think I’d have a heart attack mid-air or something. No chance.

I’d love to just have no fears though and to even enjoy it which I kind of have done a few times, but always on edge. I know they are kids of course so wired differently to us adults, but I look at my boys and how excited they are to get on a plane and by the whole experience and I want to share that with them rather than sit there like the world is going to end and actually detract from their fun by not even being unable to pretend I’m enjoying the ride or happy to be sat next to them or anyone.

Again my poor son getting to meet the pilots and I just wanted off the plane, I don’t think he even got to ask them any questions and I’m sure they thought I was rude, I know I was in terms of my attitude. If it was the cockpit of a Ferrari you couldn’t drag me away from it.

I’ve probably got 2 more flights before Xmas so I’m gonna try and do something about my fear other than grim and bear it somehow because next year my wife wants us to go back to Kenya and this time fly out together as she struggled badly with luggage and the boys over 3 flights and almost a full day at airports last year.

I went separately 2 weeks later into their month stay due to work and took my brother with me to hold my hand. We all flew back together and my fear she said made it just as unbearable for them as me and I was kind of like that coming back from Tunisia last night and going to it. I also want to not feel so anxious, sweat so much and have the kind of panic attacks I’ve had in the past because it’s awful. I’d rather sit in pain with a broken lefg or something than experience all that time and time again.

Totally understand where you’re coming from. I’m pretty much the same. TBH I take the pills more to make it easier on the people around me. I turn into a monster when I have to fly and the medication calms me down. I’m still scared but a bit more subdued and it makes it a much more pleasant experience for my loved ones!

I’m thinking of trying hypnosis because these fears are in the subconscious mind, not in the thinking mind. There must be a way to overcome it.

Offline LoveItIfWeBeatU

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #306 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 09:53:43 am »
Virgin Airlines run the following for people afraid of flying: -
https://www.flyingwithoutfear.co.uk
Thier is not a word. "Their" is the correct spelling.

Win, Lose or Draw. NOT "Loose"!

Offline ToonArmy1892

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #307 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 10:05:16 am »
Back to the footage, is that puff of smoke at the start normal?

Offline Ikon

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #308 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 10:06:58 am »
Think so, not sure what it's called though.

Offline LoveItIfWeBeatU

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #309 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 10:20:07 am »
Not seen the footage but I assume it's just a puff of exhaust gas on engine start up.

You won't get a definitive answer unless there are some pilots, aero engineers or aircraft mechanics who post on here.
Thier is not a word. "Their" is the correct spelling.

Win, Lose or Draw. NOT "Loose"!

Offline sbnufc

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #310 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 10:24:27 am »
Back to the footage, is that puff of smoke at the start normal?
yeah

Offline BlueStar

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #311 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 10:32:07 am »
Someone asked that on Reddit
Quote
Quote
I’m no expert so feel free to correct me if I’m wrong but I think it can be down to incomplete fuel combustion, oil burning off or condensed water vapour
Expert here. Your 100% correct. When a gas turbine engine shuts down there is a brief moment where fuel can still enter the combustion chamber. Because the fuel is no longer being burned it sinks to the bottom of the engine. When the engine is restarted it's then blown through to the exhaust and burned off once the engine ignites. My experience is mostly with Sea Kings where exhaust fires were pretty common though rarely serious. Just cancel the start and try again.

Online POOT

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #312 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 11:17:17 am »
That happens a lot on old diesel engines and cars with a faulty non-return fuel line.
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Online geordiedean

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #313 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 10:27:19 pm »
People who are terrified of flying telling others their misinformation about how helicopters work.

Statistically you're far more likely to die in a car than a plane or helicopter. I'll accept it's probably more terrifyingly to imagine dying in an air crash than a car crash.

There's a reason aircraft crashes make the news and car crashes rarely do. Air crashes are rare where as people die in car crashes frequently.

I often look at flight radar app and at any given time there are roughly about 25-30 thousand planes in the air multiply that by the amount of passengers on board and you then get an idea of how miniscule fatalities are through air travel. As you've said anywhere globally when a plane goes down its major headline news. Theres thousands killed daily on the roads that no one gets to hear about
and now Tudor's gone down for Newcastle

Offline Sean

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #314 on: Thursday 1 November 2018, 10:38:43 pm »
What a great owner and man. This is a great (if long) article by Henry Winter in the Times about him and what great custodian he's been for Leicester:

Quote
Too few owners respect their clubs’ traditions – Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha did

Good ownership of a football club is not simply about making the right decisions with managerial appointments, player recruitment and investment in facilities. It is also about instilling the right values or respecting principles and traditions that have served the club so well.

It is why Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha’s tragic death has caused such widespread anguish. Some fans of opposing clubs are going on Leicester City fans’ forums to express their condolences and talk of how much they admired Vichai. He was the owner they all wanted, “The People’s Billionaire” as one fan called him.

Other owners should really look and learn from Vichai’s bond with supporters, players and staff at Leicester, where he always felt more custodian than chairman. Too few owners truly respect their club’s traditions. Vichai did. The Thai businessman held Leicester customs in high regard because of his innate humility and maybe also because he hailed from a country where values, culture and the past are respected greatly.

In the directors’ lounge at Leicester, Vichai and his son Top had boards put up chronicling the club’s participation in FA Cup finals in 1949, 1961, 1963 and 1969, all lost, but still all part of the club’s long heritage. Another board marked League Cup finals in 1964, 1965, 1997, 1999 and 2000. They have boards celebrating managers and players, and a board with names of chairmen dating back to the Victorian era.

The Premier League feels at a crossroads as it heads towards substantial upheaval when its chief executive, Richard Scudamore, for so long the driving force, leaves at the end of the year. As when any leader stands down, a period of flux and uncertainty is inevitable, and increasingly disenfranchised supporters will fear certain owners flexing their muscles, demanding more of the broadcast revenue, sidelining matchgoers further.

The Premier League post-Scudamore could also provide an opportunity for a reboot, for a new start if owners follow Vichai’s example and engage properly with fans. This might be the most naive of wishes in such a brutal, commercial world but Vichai demonstrated it was possible to be philanthropic as well as business-minded. His kindness made Leicester even stronger, even more of a unified force.

Good owners can certainly be found in the Premier League, such as Dean Hoyle at Huddersfield Town, Tony Bloom at Brighton & Hove Albion, Shahid Khan at Fulham, John W Henry and Fenway Sports Group at Liverpool, Sheikh Mansour at Manchester City, Mike Garlick at Burnley, and Roman Abramovich at Chelsea. Steve Parish cares passionately for Crystal Palace while Bill Kenwright may have his shareholding in Everton reduced but never his love of the club.

But there are others, Mike Ashley at Newcastle United, Stan Kroenke at Arsenal and particularly the wretched Glazer family at Manchester United, influential figures who lack sufficient respect for the unique footballing institutions they control. Kroenke’s full takeover has broken the hearts of those Arsenal fans who gripped their share certificate as a cherished symbol of their devotion. Ashley and the Glazers are reviled for their cold grip on famous clubs.

When Malcolm Glazer passed away, The Times covered the news in 470 words, including statements from his clubs, the NFL’s Tampa Bay Buccaneers and a brief “thoughts with the family” post from United. Clearly, these were very different circumstances but the real contrast lies in the immense affection and respect in which Vichai was held, in pages of tributes as well as the carpet of flowers. Vichai cleared debts, not introduced them. He connected with fans, not alienated them. He learnt about the club.

Vichai had every right to bring in new ideas, however quirky they might seem to English eyes, and he invited Buddhist monks from the temple he attended in Thailand to pray at the King Power. Before the monks arrived, Vichai and Top asked senior figures at the club, “Is this OK?”

Vichai didn’t meddle with Leicester’s soul, didn’t mess with the colours, as Vincent Tan tried at Cardiff City. Vichai and Top were also aware of the mistakes made by Assem Allam at Hull City, basically not understanding nor respecting club lore.

Leicester remained as friendly as ever, just better organised. Key people like the legendary former player and general keeper-up-of-spirits Alan Birchenall still held court from his memorabilia-filled office at the heart of the training ground. Birch embodies Leicester: selfless, community-spirited, and defiant with a dash of humour. Vichai kept an eye on Birch when he fell ill last year. Class.

When Claudio Ranieri was overseeing training on his birthday, Vichai appeared at Belvoir Drive with a cake. “He was as a second father to me, so ‘simpatico’,” Ranieri told Italian media yesterday. Imagine Rafa Benítez and Ashley even swapping birthday cards. Unlikely.

No Arsenal player would talk of Kroenke as Kasper Schmeichel spoke of Vichai with that powerful posted eulogy, containing such lines as: “I always admired you as a leader, as a father and as a man. You made me feel like nothing was impossible. This club, this city is a family. And that is all because of you.” The Glazer children would never be embraced by players and staff as Vichai’s family were at the King Power Stadium yesterday. The Glazers need heavy security when they visit Old Trafford.

Vichai was incredibly proud to become Leicester’s owner. When they were promoted to the elite division, Top said to his father: “You are going to be the owner of a Premier League team, and there are only 20 teams in the Premier League, the top league in the world. People around the world are going to watch your team play at Old Trafford, everywhere.” His father beamed with pride.

Top also told me in an interview to celebrate that promotion four years ago that “we give our hearts to the club”. It is poignant to recall his words about Vichai. “He loves football. I love football. Me and my dad are very close and we watched English football since I was six or seven, every team, every night that we could, every week. I still love Eric Cantona. I love everything about him. I play football myself. I play up front. I played in a staff game.” Top was too modest to mention he scored a hat-trick. Modesty seems a family trait.

Top explained what underpinned his father’s humility, namely the way he worked his way up from little, fashioning the King Power empire through sheer hard work. Vichai never forgot his roots because, Top said, “he built the business from nothing. He suffered before. He had no money before.” So when he made it, when he had money, Vichai shared his success, spreading joy with his commitment to Leicester.

How many owners or co-owners beyond the Hoyles, Blooms, Parishes and Kenwrights and a few others are fully embedded emotionally in their clubs as Vichai was? He cared deeply. When Leicester won the Premier League in 2016, and Andrea Bocelli stood in the centre circle singing Nessun Dorma, the giant smile on Vichai’s face captured his delight in the club. Smartly dressed, in a fine suit and club tie, Vichai applauded Bocelli’s virtuosity as well as his players’ achievements and the fans’ ceaseless support.

Some other owners should see that an important part of Vichai’s legacy was how to treat people. When Leicester entered the Champions League, and headed off on a European tour, Vichai was there in Bruges, walking around in his Leicester polo shirt, chatting with fans who adored him. He was there in the Plaza Mayor in Madrid before the Atletico match to talk with supporters. “The People’s Billionaire” was an owner who cared, and a reminder to some of those who rule other clubs that compassion, connection and a sense of community are vital human qualities which bring respect, even love.
“I think when we score it will be from a penalty or a set play or maybe a shot from the edge of the area or a ricochet. Hopefully.” Alan Pardew, August 2014

Offline LoveItIfWeBeatU

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Re: Leicester City owner amongst 5 killed in helicopter crash at King Power stadium
« Reply #315 on: Thursday 6 December 2018, 04:01:57 pm »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-46471934

Quote
Leicester City crash helicopter rotor controls failed

The helicopter which crashed killing Leicester City's chairman and four others span out of control after a mechanism became disconnected, investigators have said.

An Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) report found cockpit pedals had disconnected from the tail rotor.

This caused the AW169 aircraft to turn uncontrollably to the right before it crashed near the King Power Stadium.

The AAIB said its inquiries into the 27 October crash are ongoing.

Leicester City owner Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha, two members of his staff Nusara Suknamai and Kaveporn Punpare, and pilots Eric Swaffer and Izabela Roza Lechowicz were killed in the crash.

A public memorial for Mr Swaffer and Ms Lechowicz - who police said was a passenger at the time of the crash - is taking place at Guildford Cathedral on Thursday.

An inspection at the crash site found parts of a mechanism linking the pilot's pedals to the tail rotor had become disconnected and there was a "build-up of black grease" on one component.

The failure of the system led to the pitch of the tail rotor blades being changed "until they reached the physical limit of their travel".

The report stated: "The initiating cause and exact sequence of the failure that resulted in the loss of tail rotor control is being investigated as a priority."

Widely shared video footage of the helicopter's last flight, taken from inside the King Power Stadium, shows the AgustaWestland AW169 climbing normally for about 40 seconds before it pauses and goes into a downward spin.

The aircraft reached an altitude of approximately 430ft then crashed to the ground.

It was rapidly engulfed in a post-impact fire and all five people on board were killed.

Following the crash, the European Aviation Safety Agency ordered safety checks to be carried out on the tail rotors of AW169s and similar models.

At the memorial service for the pilots in Guildford, Ms Lechowicz's sister Kate paid tribute to the pair saying "they were just an incredible couple and amazing pilots".

"[They were] always there for their family and friends, ready to fly across the globe to be with us or anyone who would need it."

She said both had been excited at the prospect of becoming aunt and uncle to her son who is now 18 days old.

She said: "I wish you could meet each other. We have already applied for his passport, as you wished, so he can fly before he walks.

"You have touched the lives of every single person you have met... I know I am not alone in feeling a part of me is missing that never can be replaced."
Thier is not a word. "Their" is the correct spelling.

Win, Lose or Draw. NOT "Loose"!