Newcastle-Online

General => Chat => Topic started by: OpenC on Sunday 19 June 2011, 04:41:24 PM

Title: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 June 2011, 04:41:24 PM
We don't seem to have a walking or outdoors stuff thread, and I find myself in need of wild camping advice.  I love my walking in Scotland, but I hate staying in hotels and B&Bs so I've equipped myself with a tent and sleeping bag and am intending to head up in the next few days to try out the wild camping experience.

I've never done it before, though, and I've got no idea how it works.  So..

1. Can you just pitch up anywhere you like in Scotland?  Or do you officially have to park up somewhere then take the tent away from the road?  Don't want to get moved on in the middle of the night.  I don't intend to light any fires or make any noise, just have a sleep and be away by seven bells the next morning.
2. More importantly, can anybody recommend anywhere within about an hour of Fort William, North or South (or East), to pull over and pitch?  I'll be going up via Callander, Lochearnhead and Crianlarich, but could go the Perth/Crieff way if it helps.  Glen Etive before Glen Coe looks OK, but it always seems to be already full of tents by the time I get there.

Cheers :)

<predicts zero responses>
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 19 June 2011, 04:46:34 PM
tried starting threads like this before- they are lost on these townies.

hoping to get away with the boy sometime soon, but im taking camper conversion on a site, - was thinking of wild camping for a night when we all stay in the lakes- cottage or caravan in school holidays. I was planning on a night on the beaches of Ullswater.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: POOT on Sunday 19 June 2011, 05:10:35 PM
The only camping I've done recently was in the middle of winter up at Kielder for an astro-imaging get together. Everything had a layer of frost over it but continued to work. I was warm enough with all my layers.

Anyone know of a quality tent which is pretty warm? Preferably spacious.

Can't answer any of your Qs, Open_C :(
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Keefaz on Sunday 19 June 2011, 05:29:24 PM
Nee idea, but planning on doing some camping this summer too.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:15:31 PM
Would love to try this; like the idea of stealth camping.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Dokko on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:19:01 PM
Will be out camping in the near future but at a campsite with wor lass. Would to wild camp, totally in the wilderness, bet it's s great feeling.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Dokko on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:21:05 PM
Tell you what, instead of meets in the pub, a N-O camping weekend would be great. Beers, badly burned food and football, would be ace, maybe even some fishing.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:27:02 PM

I can't wait to be honest.  Although the dogs will be a f***ing nuisance, I expect.  Nowt quite so noisy as dog feet on tent groundsheet when you're trying to sleep >_< 

Midges, though :(  They tend to take the edge off things at this time of year.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:31:31 PM
This is something I'd love to do when I pass my driving test, I bet it'd be a great/slightly terrifying experience :D

Where abouts in Scotland do you go walking C?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:34:55 PM

I've been all over the place.. at the minute, I'm confining my operations to around Fort William but when I have more time I like to get up toward Torridon way.. Liathach, Slioch, An Teallach.. proper mountains which you just don't find the likes of anywhere else in this country :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:40:50 PM
How many miles would you cover in a days walking?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:44:39 PM
Depends how high the mountains are :)  Just walking, it's easy enough to do 20-30 miles in a day or thereabouts.  Including hills and mountains makes it more awkward..

Ben Nevis the usual way is about 16km and 1300 metres of climbing.  Not sure what that is in miles.. about ten?  In the Cheviots I usually do about 22km and about the same climbing as Ben Nevis.  So maybe fifteen miles or so?  If I was just out for a walk, that's what I would be looking to do, in a leisurely six to seven hours or so.  

If I was having to carry a tent, sleeping bag and enough food for me and two dogs for two days (at least), I probably wouldn't get quite so far, though :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:46:34 PM
Tell you what, instead of meets in the pub, a N-O camping weekend would be great. Beers, badly burned food and football, would be ace, maybe even some fishing.


football hippies ftw.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:55:30 PM
Depends how high the mountains are :)  Just walking, it's easy enough to do 20-30 miles in a day or thereabouts.  Including hills and mountains makes it more awkward..

Ben Nevis the usual way is about 16km and 1300 metres of climbing.  Not sure what that is in miles.. about ten?  In the Cheviots I usually do about 22km and about the same climbing as Ben Nevis.  So maybe fifteen miles or so?  If I was just out for a walk, that's what I would be looking to do, in a leisurely six to seven hours or so. 

If I was having to carry a tent, sleeping bag and enough food for me and two dogs for two days (at least), I probably wouldn't get quite so far, though :)

I've never been walking before so you could pretty much walk all day without bumping into anyone? Is it possible to get lost?

Knowing my luck I'd walk 20 miles and then fall down a pothole and break my ankle :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 June 2011, 07:59:10 PM
In Scotland and the Lakes you're unlikely to walk too far without seeing somebody else unless you're well off the beaten track.  In the Cheviots, I can walk for eight hours and not see another soul, which is f***ing class :)  If you don't have maps, compass or GPS and the ability to use them, it's all too easy to get lost.. particularly if you're on a rocky, stony mountain and your view extends thirty yards in each direction and it all looks the same :)

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/dave.cook.70/RtCpV6L5__I/AAAAAAAAAfw/viNxWYR0brQ/s512/0824-131445.JPG)

...in each direction can quickly lead to...

(http://admin2.clikpic.com/svphotographic/images/Mount-top-mist-w-sun_DSC3198-web.jpg)

The broken ankle thing is a genuine concern.  Of course, you can always drink your own p*ss.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Sunday 19 June 2011, 08:02:52 PM
f***ing hell  :kasper:

Think I'll stick to camping in the garden.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Sunday 19 June 2011, 08:05:10 PM
By the way, genuine :lol: moment.


The broken ankle thing is a genuine concern.  Of course, you can always drink your own p*ss.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 19 June 2011, 08:05:45 PM
on the subject of broken ankles, i climbed catbells lasy year while still on crutches for multiple ankle break, did it because the surgeon and physios said it was impossible, damn near was.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 June 2011, 08:07:31 PM
Catbells is a rocky little f***er toward the top, particularly from the North.. can't imagine doing it on crutches >_<

(http://thehikingwolfpack.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/catbells2.jpg)

Not easy, like :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 19 June 2011, 08:11:24 PM

Catbells is a rocky little f***er toward the top, particularly from the North.. can't imagine doing it on crutches >_<


its a canny scramble, some proper climbing there like- left the crutches in the car used walking poles, was still having to stop and wait for the mrs even on one leg. :lol:  my boy was canny scared by some of the climbing- really enjoyed it- never wanted to climb it before as thought it was too small, just for begginers etc- but really did enjoy that hill.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 June 2011, 08:13:43 PM
Yeah, it's a great little mountain.  My lass wanted to do it because it was little, but she was f***ing terrified on that bit up the page :)  There's nothing as hard as that on most of the routes up Scafell Pike, Bowfell, Blencathra, Great Gable, etc etc :)

Have you tried Haystacks (from Scarth Gap, not around the other way)?  Same sort of thing but even better tbh.  Wainwright knew what he was doing to pick it as his favourite.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 19 June 2011, 08:19:52 PM

Yeah, it's a great little mountain.  My lass wanted to do it because it was little, but she was f***ing terrified on that bit up the page :)  There's nothing as hard as that on most of the routes up Scafell Pike, Bowfell, Blencathra, Great Gable, etc etc :)

Have you tried Haystacks?  Same sort of thing but even better tbh.  Wainwright knew what he was doing to pick it as his favourite.



not been there will have a look, im hoping to do High street from Barton fell soon because that is the least steep route from where we camp at pooley bridge, think its about 20mile round trip- taking the boy - we tried to get to high street from patterdale last year but turned back at angle tarn, cos the kid was soaked through to his skin,  love High Street. if i can it will be the third time ive been there.
Gonna check it out for moutain biking- think thats the way Im going due to ongoing ankle probs.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Wullie on Sunday 19 June 2011, 08:41:15 PM
f***ing hell  :kasper:

Think I'll stick to camping in the garden.

 :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 June 2011, 08:59:17 PM

Getting lost for hours and potentially falling off a 450 metre cliff in the mist is part of the attraction, man

>_<
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Karjala on Sunday 19 June 2011, 10:10:39 PM
Done loads of wild camping in a motorhome, only had one bad experience with a load of chavs up in Scotland at Mennock Pass...

Tent wise, i would try and keep it out of site.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 June 2011, 07:33:56 AM

Think I'll just head up toward Bridge of Orchy and Glen Etive and see what I can see.  Slightly paranoid about leaving the car by the roadside overnight, but the Highlands aren't a notorious hotbed of car cime.  I'll probably end up sleeping in the car and being too cramped up to do any walking the next day :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 20 June 2011, 02:25:11 PM

Think I'll just head up toward Bridge of Orchy and Glen Etive and see what I can see.  Slightly paranoid about leaving the car by the roadside overnight, but the Highlands aren't a notorious hotbed of car cime.  I'll probably end up sleeping in the car and being too cramped up to do any walking the next day :)

So you just rock up in your car to the middle of nowhere and go for a geet big massive Bear Grylls style trek, yeah? Sounds class. Where do you live out of interest?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 June 2011, 05:11:37 PM
That's the plan :)  I live in Longframlington, on the road up toward Wooler and Coldstream, putting the Cheviots on my doorstep so I do quite a bit of massive Bear Grylls style trekking anyway.  Just there's more rock and steeper slopes in Scotland, which makes it more interesting :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: BoSelecta on Monday 20 June 2011, 05:36:58 PM
If your heading up past Glencoe i would deffo do the five sisters, and ben chapuil. We've always holidayed up that neck of the wood and were always nicking off wild camping for a while. If you bare with me il get me dad onto the case, he's done 90% of the munroes round the area your talking about so il see what he has to say.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 June 2011, 05:42:17 PM

Nice one, much obliged.  Haven't been up through Glen Shiel for years.. I made a start up The Saddle but was turned back by snow (not a crampon user back then), but never tried the five sisters.  Looks lovely :)

(http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/kintail/2_6/2_6_5l.JPG)

 :smitten:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 20 June 2011, 06:40:58 PM
f***, I want to climb that f***er, ffs.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 20 June 2011, 07:00:21 PM
Shame there are no mountains next to North Tyneside otherwise I would be climbing the t*** the morra!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 June 2011, 07:24:10 PM
Liathach and An Teallach are the ones to go for:

(http://munro-madness.com/files/282854_27f9406e.jpg)

(http://gallery.photo.net/photo/5999062-md.jpg)

:smitten: :smitten: :smitten:

Nowt quite of that quality in this country (or Wales, for that matter), but there are some ways up Blencathra in the Lakes which may satisfy, and that's just a couple of hours away max :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: KennyP on Monday 20 June 2011, 07:53:16 PM
Shame there are no mountains next to North Tyneside otherwise I would be climbing the t*** the morra!
This one isn't too far away from you. O0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPOzzI5E0F8 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPOzzI5E0F8)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 20 June 2011, 08:40:21 PM
Shame there are no mountains next to North Tyneside otherwise I would be climbing the t*** the morra!


rising sun pit heap is a canny little hill like.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Wullie on Monday 20 June 2011, 08:42:37 PM
What do you take with you when you go to climb a peak like the two on this page, O_C?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Monday 20 June 2011, 08:43:13 PM
(http://gallery.photo.net/photo/5999062-md.jpg)

This looks absolutely gorgeous :) Did you take it?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 20 June 2011, 09:11:00 PM
Shame there are no mountains next to North Tyneside otherwise I would be climbing the t*** the morra!


rising sun pit heap is a canny little hill like.

Theres a big hill round there? Never noticed one before.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 June 2011, 09:16:27 PM
I didn't :(  But now I'm getting a small and decent camera, I can get stuff like it in the future \o/

To just climb these two, you need not much more than a decent pair of boots, plenty of water, a bit of willpower and a bit of nerve.  I generally also take two Cocker Spaniels.  In winter, you need to add crampons and ice axe.  I've never walked the ridges between the various summits of these hills, though - I've been up the East top of Liathach and never got to any of An Teallach's tops due to grisly cloud.  The ridges that run across the top of these two are particularly intimidating.

This is a particularly famous bit of An Teallach, for example (spoiler due to big image)

Spoiler
(http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/8100902.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Monday 20 June 2011, 09:28:40 PM
Not a f***ing chance you'd get me on there :lol: Feel sick just looking at those guys standing at the side.

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 06:50:52 AM
Aye, I'm not a huge fan of that sort of thing myself (particularly with dogs.. although they're more sure-footed than people, I always worry about them knocking some poor f***er off).  Thankfully, the vast majority of mountains in Britain you can get up with your hands in your pockets should you so desire, although in Scotland particularly the occasional hands-down moment is unavoidable.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 09:41:44 AM
Aye, I'm not a huge fan of that sort of thing myself (particularly with dogs.. although they're more sure-footed than people, I always worry about them knocking some poor f***er off).  Thankfully, the vast majority of mountains in Britain you can get up with your hands in your pockets should you so desire, although in Scotland particularly the occasional hands-down moment is unavoidable.


any problems with them going for sheep?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 09:45:27 AM

Nah, they live near enough sheep farms (and have, as a result, been kicked by enough tups) to know better, thankfully.  They don't bother with them at all.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: BlufPurdi on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 09:50:19 AM

Think I'll just head up toward Bridge of Orchy and Glen Etive and see what I can see.  Slightly paranoid about leaving the car by the roadside overnight, but the Highlands aren't a notorious hotbed of car cime.  I'll probably end up sleeping in the car and being too cramped up to do any walking the next day :)

Besy way to do it.  You'll be able to find a wee alcove somewhere, or hide behind some trees for your car generally.  Admittedly not done wild camping in a good ten years, but it's the business.  Scotland would be my last choice of destination mind you, the weather is just too unpredictable and when it gets bad, it gets really bad.  Which is more often the case than not!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 09:52:57 AM

Aye, it does that >_<  The camping is just a means to an end, though, so I'll not be too gutted about shitty weather (easy to say now).  You don't go to Scotland for the tan, after all :)

Cheers for the advice, though.. good to know that I'm on the right sort of lines.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: BlufPurdi on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 09:58:17 AM
I've only ever camped in Scotland (bar festivals), so my vision of camping in England is probably more than delusional anyway. :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 10:01:38 AM

I think it's just about accepted above intake walls, but it's also borderline illegal in England and Wales, which sort of takes the edge off it.  If a farmer sees you heading up toward a mountain at 5PM, he's probably going to be suspicious :)  And I think the wettest I've ever got was on Scafell Pike rather than any Scottish mountain, so they don't have exclusivity on s**** weather.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: BoSelecta on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 01:58:39 PM
Try camping at the head of Glen Nevis, you can pitch your tent right by the car and you'll be surrounded by brilliant moutains. If your worried about where to camp, try googling wild camping in Scotland, you can drop your tent anywhere. You'd never have any problems leaving your car in the highlands for a few days whist your off. Best of luck.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 02:20:16 PM

Was considering Glen Nevis, but I suspected it would be a touch on the busy side..

Cheers though, I'll certainly have a look :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 04:29:51 PM
done a bit wild camping when i was younger (if you can call it that when you stopping on a mates uncles farm but we never bothered him and he never bothered us.). i'd love to camp on top of windy gyll for a sunset and sunrise. off to the lakes with the family in the summer so hopefully drag the wife up a hill or two and hopefully come september i'll be less tied (school runs) so can get out more.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: BoSelecta on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 05:05:37 PM
Sorry i couldnt give you more info, i thought my dad might of had more to say!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 05:43:34 PM

Nah, it's good to know that it's possible.  Was imagining all kinds of restrictions and byelaws at Glen Nevis, obviously there aren't any :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 21 June 2011, 09:09:08 PM

Forecast for Fort William is hail showers on Thursday and snow on the tops.  I'm going up on Friday :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 24 June 2011, 10:10:57 PM
Camp set up under the buachaille etive mor at the corner of glencoe and glen etive. All splendid so far, and enough signal to post this, so even better.  Are there bears in scotland?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Keefaz on Friday 24 June 2011, 10:13:02 PM
Camp set up under the buachaille etive mor at the corner of glencoe and glen etive. All splendid so far, and enough signal to post this, so even better.  Are there bears in scotland?

Only the gay kind, I think.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Friday 24 June 2011, 10:15:14 PM
Camp set up under the buachaille etive mor at the corner of glencoe and glen etive. All splendid so far, and enough signal to post this, so even better.  Are there bears in scotland?

fantastic place that- get some pics up- have a good un. there are some wild bears, wolves, stags, highland cattle, wilderbeast,Elephants rats, bats, eagles, giant spiders, mozzies and midges- but other than that nowt much to worry about
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 June 2011, 06:05:01 AM
Survived :thup: now off up the mountains. Miles better than hotels and b&bs, everyone should try it once :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Saturday 25 June 2011, 09:08:20 AM
Camp set up under the buachaille etive mor at the corner of glencoe and glen etive. All splendid so far, and enough signal to post this, so even better.  Are there bears in scotland?

Only the gay kind, I think.

:lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 June 2011, 06:57:14 PM
(http://img845.imageshack.us/img845/9066/wildcamp.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/845/wildcamp.jpg/)

:thup:

Fire wasn't mine, but I thought it improved the picture :lol:  Next time I'll be brave enough to venture away from the road, not that the Glen Etive road is a particularly busy one.  Felt better being next to the car first time, though :)

Had a splendid time, can't wait to do it again.  Best bath I've ever had when I got home :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Saturday 25 June 2011, 07:02:00 PM
I bet you didn't sleep a wink though :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 June 2011, 07:02:36 PM

Out like a light, mate :)  Started raining at about 2AM which woke me up, but it was such a hypnotic noise that I went straight back to sleep again :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Saturday 25 June 2011, 07:10:39 PM
I'd be lying awake all night waiting for some psycho to come and attack me tent like so fair play to you for doing it :lol:

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 June 2011, 07:16:04 PM

It's Scotland, man

Nothing bad ever happens in Scotland
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: AliGupter on Saturday 25 June 2011, 07:16:39 PM

It's Scotland, man

Nothing bad ever happens in Scotland

I go to Scotland on a fairly regular basis. :undecided:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 June 2011, 07:59:36 PM
And nothing bad ever happens to you, or as a result of your being there..?

:undecided:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: AliGupter on Saturday 25 June 2011, 08:03:00 PM
And nothing bad ever happens to you, or as a result of your being there..?

:undecided:

That is for you to work out. :undecided:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 June 2011, 08:07:34 PM

Meh, it's a big place.  I'll just consider myself unlucky if I run into you and you're in the mood for :undecided:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 26 June 2011, 08:31:50 PM
Hows Kielder forest for wild camping?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 26 June 2011, 09:37:13 PM

Technically illegal, is all I know :(
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 26 June 2011, 09:38:57 PM

Technically illegal, is all I know :(

could see camp fires being an issue like. theres a few sites up there like. would love to camp at redesdale near the end of the forest drive.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Sunday 26 June 2011, 09:45:03 PM
i think the only place you're allowed to camp is at kielder castle and the bit on the lake side where only the scouts are allowed, just up beyond leaplish.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 26 June 2011, 10:30:39 PM
But shirley kielder forest is so massive that you could wild camp quite easily without anyone seeing you, no?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 26 June 2011, 10:36:35 PM
But shirley kielder forest is so massive that you could wild camp quite easily without anyone seeing you, no?


wood imagine so.
just watch out for forest clearing in the morning.




if a tree falls over in the night when your wild camping and your asleep and dont hear it- did it make a noise?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Sunday 26 June 2011, 10:56:54 PM
But shirley kielder forest is so massive that you could wild camp quite easily without anyone seeing you, no?
definitly, same goes for most of the northumberland national park, especially if you leave it till late and pack up early. i'd be more worried about where i'd left the car. if it was somewhere like barrowburn there'd be every chance of a search party being sent out looking on the basis of the car and i wouldn't want to crreate all that hassle.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Sunday 26 June 2011, 10:57:21 PM
But shirley kielder forest is so massive that you could wild camp quite easily without anyone seeing you, no?


wood imagine so.
just watch out for forest clearing in the morning.




if a tree falls over in the night when your wild camping and your asleep and dont hear it- did it make a noise?
aye..."squish"
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Keefaz on Sunday 26 June 2011, 10:59:49 PM
But shirley kielder forest is so massive that you could wild camp quite easily without anyone seeing you, no?


wood imagine so.
just watch out for forest clearing in the morning.




if a tree falls over in the night when your wild camping and your asleep and dont hear it- did it make a noise?
aye..."squish"

And then the terrible screams as you have to cut off your own trapped leg with a camping spork.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: HTT on Monday 27 June 2011, 06:42:56 PM
Used to wild camp all the time when I was a bairn and is something I'd love to get back into now.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 27 June 2011, 07:44:39 PM

Not got a lot of time for the whole bbq-and-getting-p*ssed-with-your-mates side of it, but Glen Etive the other night was so beautiful and quiet and relaxing... I really enjoyed it, like.  Can't wait to do it again :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 29 June 2011, 09:37:59 PM

If there are any seasoned crampon users on here, what's the difference between C1 and C2 crampons?  I'm currently using C1 rated Grivel G10s which are strapping onto a boot which isn't officially suitable (but which I've never had a problem with).  Probably going to head down to Go Outdoors tomorrow for the 15% sale and pick up a pair of Scarpa B2 rated boots - but will there be any real benefit in also upgrading to C2 crampons?  I don't intend to go front-pointing up a frozen waterfall any time soon, so what difference will I notice between C1 and C2 on general walking terrain?  Just increased stability on steeper slopes?

I realise that this post, like this thread, is possibly another long shot.  But you never know :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 29 June 2011, 09:43:10 PM
you need to ask about crampons for espadrilles :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 29 June 2011, 09:46:19 PM

:lol:  Possibly :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 30 June 2011, 08:17:34 PM
But shirley kielder forest is so massive that you could wild camp quite easily without anyone seeing you, no?


was talking to one of my customers today who says wild camp in keilder all the time. rekons try and hide, and go light cos if you do get caught, you dont get shot or owt, they just tell you to move on, hence the need to pack up sharpish. but she said they just head to another favoured spot and set up again. sounds like a bit of cat and mouse like.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 23 July 2011, 11:30:11 AM
anybody know any good walks around Alston- or recomend a good Penine Way map for that area.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Colocho on Saturday 23 July 2011, 11:33:39 AM
anybody know any good walks around Alston- or recomend a good Penine Way map for that area.

There's a tourist information centre in Alston, they have some good maps.

The station is well worth a look.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 23 July 2011, 12:07:24 PM
anybody know any good walks around Alston- or recomend a good Penine Way map for that area.

There's a tourist information centre in Alston, they have some good maps.

The station is well worth a look.



yeah might go for a ride on the south tyne steam railway. just booked a cottage for 5 days end august. no internets tho- theres a cyber cafe there somewhere, and i could always put some credit on my mobile dongle- if i can find it.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 31 July 2011, 07:16:50 PM
Tried to do high st from pooley bridge yesterday about 16 miles round trip, over a few fells on way. thought i could do it in about b5-6 hours. got to high raise in 5 hrs, 2 mile short high st. and gave up took 8 and half hours in total to get back to car - over 14miles, and numerous climbs.
 Was totally f***ed last night it was fking brutal, got knows how a ten year old felt. he said it stopped being fun and felf like torture after about 5 hrs. he did the last few miles over peat bogs in socks his feet had swollen so much he couldnt get his boots back on. His mother would stop me seeing him, if she saw the state I got him back to the car.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 31 July 2011, 07:43:03 PM
Yeah, that's a hell of a walk for anyone, never mind a bairn.  Well done on getting so far, all the same.  Still never been in the far East of the lakes, I must give it a shot.

Still feeling it today?  And how did the ankles hold out (or am I thinking of someone else with dodgy ankles)?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 31 July 2011, 07:48:26 PM
Yeah, that's a hell of a walk for anyone, never mind a bairn.  Well done on getting so far, all the same.  Still never been in the far East of the lakes, I must give it a shot.

Still feeling it today?  And how did the ankles hold out (or am I thinking of someone else with dodgy ankles)?


yeah thats me with the ankle. really misjudged how much the ankle has taken out of me for such activities. struggled badly towards end, as did boy. we must have looked well rough coming back down like :lol: his socks were blackof the peat- even tho it was well dried out. theres some lovely walks and stunning views from that area. a good lesson learned tho. think 6-7 miles when climbing is enough nowadays.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Saturday 13 August 2011, 01:53:49 PM
Not wild camping but does anyone know of any decent camp sites in the north east? Looking for somewhere cheap, dog friendly, not too busy with some good walking etc.. :) Not too much to ask I know..
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 13 August 2011, 08:14:55 PM
Not wild camping but does anyone know of any decent camp sites in the north east? Looking for somewhere cheap, dog friendly, not too busy with some good walking etc.. :) Not too much to ask I know..


wallsend burn
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: KennyP on Saturday 13 August 2011, 10:55:07 PM
Not wild camping but does anyone know of any decent camp sites in the north east? Looking for somewhere cheap, dog friendly, not too busy with some good walking etc.. :) Not too much to ask I know..
Do a search on here.........http://www.ukcampsite.co.uk/ (http://www.ukcampsite.co.uk/) :coolsmiley:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Tuesday 16 August 2011, 12:44:04 PM
Anyone been to Brockwell Wood?

Sounds brilliant

Quote
Brockwell Wood is conveniently situated only 7 miles out of Newcastle upon Tyne in 26.5 acres of ancient woodland, offering visitors a tranquil, yet accessible, retreat from the hurly-burly of modern life.

This campsite is suitable for those who want a back to nature experience. We are offering real back to basics, no nonsense proper camping where camp fires are allowed.

There aren't toilets but we can provide you with a spade to dig your own and there is water 10 minutes walk away at the farmhouse. This is "camping sauvage" at its best!

The nearest pub is The Black Horse at Barlow one mile to the West - you can get food, real ale and the country pub experience there.

The nearest shops are at Winlaton, one mile in the opposite direction, Newcastle City Centre is 7 miles away, the Roman Wall about 20 miles and the Cheviots 40 miles.

Booking is essential so please email or phone your requests.

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Colocho on Tuesday 16 August 2011, 03:13:58 PM
North-West Cornwall is one of my favourite areas to go hiking/camping.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 17 August 2011, 04:39:02 PM

Going back up to Scotland this weekend with the tent (and the dogs this time).  Cannot wait :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Wednesday 17 August 2011, 05:12:12 PM
I booked into that place for the weekend.. will throw up a review and pics when I get home on Sunday... or Friday night if I get sick :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Saturday 20 August 2011, 08:04:56 AM
f***ing awful this like, had about an hours sleep and I've just been bitten by f*** knows what and me arm has swelled and starting to rash. Apart from that it's canny.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: ObiChrisKenobi on Saturday 20 August 2011, 08:26:30 AM
 :lol:

Strangled any wild animals due to lack of wifi access yet?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Saturday 20 August 2011, 08:48:24 AM
:lol: Nah although I was tempted last night, some bird going off it at 3am near the tent, lass reckons it was a fox like. Think I'd go insane without the 3G net access on me phone.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: ObiChrisKenobi on Saturday 20 August 2011, 08:50:19 AM
A fox pretending to be a bird? Cunning little s***s like, going to all that trouble to get a bird in trouble.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Saturday 20 August 2011, 08:54:51 AM
She says Foxes squeak, not having it.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: ObiChrisKenobi on Saturday 20 August 2011, 09:14:03 AM
Probably just an escaped Loon out to get him some skin off the back of some innocent campers.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 20 August 2011, 09:18:20 PM

It was lashing down in Glencoe when I pitched the tent, 50% rain and 50% midges, and continued to lash down all night and for significant proportions of my mountain climbing today

It was f***ing class :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Sunday 21 August 2011, 02:07:04 PM
Brockwell wood was decent and would recommend it for people who want a "wild" camping experience. Basically you arrive, get designated a spot if there is one and then you're given a map, shovel and saw and off you go... no facilities anywhere, well there's a tap to fill up your water if you need it but that's it :lol:

You get plenty of space like and there's ton of wood to gather for the fire, we got a great little spot with tree to sit on :snod: Dogs are allowed so it was ideal for us.. you're a stones throw away from the Metro n arl so if you get bored there's nothing stopping you from getting away for the day then coming back for the night/campfire or whatever.

First night was a nightmare as we put the tent on rough flooring covered in nuts and it was on a little bit of a tilt! :lol: Moved it for Saturday and it was miles better... anyway here's some pics of our site.

Map

Spoiler
(http://img850.imageshack.us/img850/2966/img4999y.jpg)

Camp site 5A

Spoiler
(http://img695.imageshack.us/img695/6081/img4909e.jpg)

Man at work :smug:

Spoiler
(http://img694.imageshack.us/img694/5484/img4917ec.jpg)

Woods around our tent

Spoiler
(http://img600.imageshack.us/img600/5590/img4984i.jpg)

Fields behind woods

Spoiler
(http://img684.imageshack.us/img684/1368/img4945w.jpg)

Dog loving it

Spoiler
(http://img716.imageshack.us/img716/8063/img4967lg.jpg)

Best sausages ever

Spoiler
(http://img29.imageshack.us/img29/5464/img4936a.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 21 August 2011, 02:13:27 PM
cracking pics clay.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 21 August 2011, 02:19:36 PM
would recommend it for people who want a "wild" camping experience.

there's a tap to fill up your water if you need it

Pffft, "wild"  :nope:

[/camping snob]

Top pictures, looks like a good place :thup:  Would you do it again, or was once enough?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 21 August 2011, 02:23:07 PM
would recommend it for people who want a "wild" camping experience.

there's a tap to fill up your water if you need it

Pffft, "wild"  :nope:

[/camping snob]

Top pictures, looks like a good place :thup:  Would you do it again, or was once enough?


snob- im off bank holiday week- bottled it tho and booked a cottage, good excuse tho, 10 week old babe.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Sunday 21 August 2011, 02:26:00 PM
:lol: That's why I said "wild" man.. we only used it once like, ran out of water for the Coffees and the other half is a coffee addict.

Aye, got loads more pictures but the majority turned out blurry as I ended up with rubbish shutter speeds because of the light and tbh I wasn't that bothered about taking 'proper' photos.

I would go again for a weekend as it's great sitting around a camp fire at night but I wouldn't do it too often, there's nothing to do except collecting firewood and it's not as if you can go for a massive walk or out, the woods are pretty small at 26 acres.

Not sure where to go next, any suggestions?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 21 August 2011, 02:28:01 PM
keilder?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: ObiChrisKenobi on Sunday 21 August 2011, 02:47:31 PM
A very elaborate plan, Clay, but we all know its a lie. We saw you. With your season ticket for the Stadium of Light on Saturday. Mackem.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 21 August 2011, 03:36:37 PM

:lol:

To be honest, 90% of the reason I went to Scotland this weekend was to avoid the derby :)  I met a surprising number of Newcastle fans doing exactly the same :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 11 February 2012, 12:47:40 PM
Booked four nights in Torridon in the middle of March.  Best place in the country for hillwalkers (in my humble opinion, of course).

Weather (and bravery) permitting, got all four of these in mind:

Slioch
(http://www.strathspeywildlife.co.uk/Images/Slioch-A2-IMG_0250.jpg)

Beinn Alligin
(http://pathannay.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/horns-of-alligin.jpg)

An Teallach
(http://www.moran-mountain.co.uk/pictures/An%20Teallach%2018%20Apr.jpg)

And Liathach, which requires considerable willpower and which I might end up just walking around, rather than up :lol:
(http://www.loveofscotland.com/pics/liathachloch1.jpg)

Anybody been walking up there and have any experience of these..?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 11 February 2012, 08:37:45 PM
 :yao:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 11 February 2012, 08:40:52 PM
I know of at least one other forum member that's climbed a mountain in Scotland :undecided:  And if I'm not mistaken, Mr Logic was up there on holiday last year.

Was worth a go :lol:  Can't wait.. just hope that a fair bit of the snow will be gone by then.  They're long and painful days when you're in crampons from the car park :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 11 February 2012, 08:45:00 PM
I aske dmy son, 11 if we could go walking in the lakes around easter- he wasnt very keen, says I ' go too near the edges' just showed him your pics now theres no hope. :lol:

considering moutain biking ( low) and canoeing instead.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 11 February 2012, 08:48:04 PM
:lol:

Everything around the Torridon area is like that :)  Or, at least, it felt that way last time I was up there.  Been a bit of the way up An Teallach (was not so bad, but didn't get anywhere near the picture above) and to the closest summit you can see on the Liathach picture (most terrifying thing I've ever done in my life, and the sight of the ridge on top put the fear of God in me).  Once you're above a certain altitude, staying away from the edges stops being an option, really.. it's just which edge you're near to.

Liathach ridge spoilered in case sensitive sons see it :lol:
Spoiler
(http://www.caledoniahilltreks.com/gallery08/liathach_june08/19%20Pinnacle%20Ridge.jpg)

Even more hideous Lord Berkeley's Seat on An Teallach, which I won't be going anywhere near :lol:
Spoiler
(http://s0.geograph.org.uk/photos/58/04/580482_727833e7.jpg)

Mountain biking and canoeing is still the great outdoors :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 11 February 2012, 08:55:12 PM
:lol:

Everything around the Torridon area is like that :)  Or, at least, it felt that way last time I was up there.  Been a bit of the way up An Teallach (was not so bad, but didn't get anywhere near the picture above) and to the closest summit you can see on the Liathach picture (most terrifying thing I've ever done in my life, and the sight of the ridge on top put the fear of God in me).  Once you're above a certain altitude, staying away from the edges stops being an option, really.. it's just which edge you're near to.

Mountain biking and canoeing is still the great outdoors :thup:

yeah went along high st, with him last year as its more round than sharp- but it was way too long. probs drag him up something else without edges.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Saturday 11 February 2012, 10:10:11 PM
:lol:

Everything around the Torridon area is like that :)  Or, at least, it felt that way last time I was up there.  Been a bit of the way up An Teallach (was not so bad, but didn't get anywhere near the picture above) and to the closest summit you can see on the Liathach picture (most terrifying thing I've ever done in my life, and the sight of the ridge on top put the fear of God in me).  Once you're above a certain altitude, staying away from the edges stops being an option, really.. it's just which edge you're near to.

Mountain biking and canoeing is still the great outdoors :thup:

yeah went along high st, with him last year as its more round than sharp- but it was way too long. probs drag him up something else without edges.
had the girls up pike o blisco last year and they said never again.....3 days later they were on top of catbells.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 11 February 2012, 10:12:27 PM
:lol:

Everything around the Torridon area is like that :)  Or, at least, it felt that way last time I was up there.  Been a bit of the way up An Teallach (was not so bad, but didn't get anywhere near the picture above) and to the closest summit you can see on the Liathach picture (most terrifying thing I've ever done in my life, and the sight of the ridge on top put the fear of God in me).  Once you're above a certain altitude, staying away from the edges stops being an option, really.. it's just which edge you're near to.

Mountain biking and canoeing is still the great outdoors :thup:

yeah went along high st, with him last year as its more round than sharp- but it was way too long. probs drag him up something else without edges.
had the girls up pike o blisco last year and they said never again.....3 days later they were on top of catbells.



lots of mountain for your money on catbells.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Saturday 11 February 2012, 10:16:54 PM
:lol:

Everything around the Torridon area is like that :)  Or, at least, it felt that way last time I was up there.  Been a bit of the way up An Teallach (was not so bad, but didn't get anywhere near the picture above) and to the closest summit you can see on the Liathach picture (most terrifying thing I've ever done in my life, and the sight of the ridge on top put the fear of God in me).  Once you're above a certain altitude, staying away from the edges stops being an option, really.. it's just which edge you're near to.

Mountain biking and canoeing is still the great outdoors :thup:

yeah went along high st, with him last year as its more round than sharp- but it was way too long. probs drag him up something else without edges.
had the girls up pike o blisco last year and they said never again.....3 days later they were on top of catbells.



lots of mountain for your money on catbells.

great for kids, an hour up, great view, hour down and if you get the launch from keswick it's even more fun.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 11 February 2012, 10:18:30 PM
:lol:

Everything around the Torridon area is like that :)  Or, at least, it felt that way last time I was up there.  Been a bit of the way up An Teallach (was not so bad, but didn't get anywhere near the picture above) and to the closest summit you can see on the Liathach picture (most terrifying thing I've ever done in my life, and the sight of the ridge on top put the fear of God in me).  Once you're above a certain altitude, staying away from the edges stops being an option, really.. it's just which edge you're near to.

Mountain biking and canoeing is still the great outdoors :thup:

yeah went along high st, with him last year as its more round than sharp- but it was way too long. probs drag him up something else without edges.
had the girls up pike o blisco last year and they said never again.....3 days later they were on top of catbells.



lots of mountain for your money on catbells.

great for kids, an hour up, great view, hour down and if you get the launch from keswick it's even more fun.


you need to tell my lass it only takes an hour :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Saturday 11 February 2012, 10:42:55 PM
:lol:

Everything around the Torridon area is like that :)  Or, at least, it felt that way last time I was up there.  Been a bit of the way up An Teallach (was not so bad, but didn't get anywhere near the picture above) and to the closest summit you can see on the Liathach picture (most terrifying thing I've ever done in my life, and the sight of the ridge on top put the fear of God in me).  Once you're above a certain altitude, staying away from the edges stops being an option, really.. it's just which edge you're near to.

Mountain biking and canoeing is still the great outdoors :thup:

yeah went along high st, with him last year as its more round than sharp- but it was way too long. probs drag him up something else without edges.
had the girls up pike o blisco last year and they said never again.....3 days later they were on top of catbells.



lots of mountain for your money on catbells.

great for kids, an hour up, great view, hour down and if you get the launch from keswick it's even more fun.


you need to tell my lass it only takes an hour :lol:
Hey cp40's lass, climbing catbells only take's about an hour, my wife and kids done it, steep at the start, little bit of scrambling half way to make it fun then a stroll, views fabtastic from the top especially north over bassenthwaite.

fair enough ?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 12 February 2012, 08:20:44 AM
Nice little scramble to finish as well, makes it feel like a mountain.. and there's an easier (albeit longer) way down :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 12 February 2012, 09:06:03 AM
:lol:

Everything around the Torridon area is like that :)  Or, at least, it felt that way last time I was up there.  Been a bit of the way up An Teallach (was not so bad, but didn't get anywhere near the picture above) and to the closest summit you can see on the Liathach picture (most terrifying thing I've ever done in my life, and the sight of the ridge on top put the fear of God in me).  Once you're above a certain altitude, staying away from the edges stops being an option, really.. it's just which edge you're near to.

Mountain biking and canoeing is still the great outdoors :thup:

yeah went along high st, with him last year as its more round than sharp- but it was way too long. probs drag him up something else without edges.
had the girls up pike o blisco last year and they said never again.....3 days later they were on top of catbells.



lots of mountain for your money on catbells.

great for kids, an hour up, great view, hour down and if you get the launch from keswick it's even more fun.


you need to tell my lass it only takes an hour :lol:
Hey cp40's lass, climbing catbells only take's about an hour, my wife and kids done it, steep at the start, little bit of scrambling half way to make it fun then a stroll, views fabtastic from the top especially north over bassenthwaite.

fair enough ?

fair enough- but it took her nearer 2. I was on one leg and stopping for her :lol:... and took open cs long way back. lovely walk back round the bottom of the hill-


(http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/47483_439316217560_588627560_5017300_3446909_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 24 February 2012, 09:41:22 PM

FAO Clay :)

Blencathra (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blencathra)

Skiddaw (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skiddaw)

Both well worth climbing :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Saturday 25 February 2012, 06:17:46 AM
Surprised there is that kind of terrain in Britain, to be honest.  Those pictures above of each of the peaks look awesome.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: magpie418 on Saturday 25 February 2012, 06:59:43 AM
I did the Coast to Coast walk a few years ago, St Bees to Robin Hoods Bay, took 2 weeks and was thouroughly enjoyable. You can divert from the path when walking through the Lake District and do a few big climbs/walks, although I missed out on Striding Edge due to the weather - my arse was pretty happy about that though :lol:

(http://www.pashuk.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/packhorse-map2.jpg)

Did a mixture of camping & BB's along the way, would love to do the whole thing camping next time.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 February 2012, 10:54:42 AM
Always fancied a long distance path, like, but I get waylaid by the mountains instead >_<  One day I'll do the Pennine Way, or the West Highland Way maybe :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Saturday 25 February 2012, 05:29:32 PM
What kind of wild animals do you have to worry about while camping in the UK?  I feel like it would be much more relaxing than camping in Florida is.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 25 February 2012, 05:30:49 PM
What kind of wild animals do you have to worry about while camping in the UK?  I feel like it would be much more relaxing than camping in Florida is.

charvers, and people from council estates on outward bound courses.


edit- and midges will eat you alive in half an hour.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Saturday 25 February 2012, 05:35:48 PM
What kind of wild animals do you have to worry about while camping in the UK?  I feel like it would be much more relaxing than camping in Florida is.

charvers, and people from council estates on outward bound courses.


edit- and midges will eat you alive in half an hour.

True :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 February 2012, 06:32:18 PM
About a billion times more relaxing than Florida, but about a billion times colder as well :lol:

In the Cheviots, flying insects are irritating.  In the Lakes, there aren't really any at all.  But no amount of stories about how grim midges are can prepare you for the awful truth, like.  Midges in the Highlands of Scotland are like nothing else I've ever experienced.  Still got scars on my legs from last August :lol: 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: ross magoo on Saturday 25 February 2012, 07:52:54 PM
Frustrating day at Glen Lyon today.  Weather was fine down low but once we'd climbed up above 800m the conditions changed and the summit of Carn Gorm felt like the most hostile inhospitable place on earth.  Zero visibility and the strongest coldest wind i've ever experienced.  I managed to get a wee bit of shelter in the rounded cairn at the top and took my gloves off for no more than a minute to f*** about with my compass and i didn't regain the feeling in my fingers again for about another 20 mins.  We had a brief conversation, the conclusion of which was that only a fool would attempt to continue the route and climb the other three munros.  We descended back the way we came and the two groups behind us did likewise which made us feel a bit better about our decision.

Had a bar lunch in Aberfeldy on the way home.  Wasn't a complete waste of a day, we got one munro and we've got an excuse to go back and do the rest on a better day.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 February 2012, 07:59:04 PM

Hills will always be there, like.  No sense ticking them off just for the sake of it.  Turning round if you feel you should is almost always the right decision :thup:

How much snow is there up there at the minute?  And at what sort of level does it become unavoidable?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Saturday 25 February 2012, 08:25:46 PM
After googling what the term "midges" was, it turns out we also have those in Florida under the moniker "no-see-ums" and I can confirm that they really do suck.  We have much more worrisome (and bigger) bugs here to contend with though. 

I would love to go over to the UK for a nice camping trip in the summer months.  The best time I ever had over there was walking over some hills on the public footpaths through the Ashdown Forest (my mom is a huge Winne the Pooh fanatic).
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: ross magoo on Saturday 25 February 2012, 08:41:12 PM

Hills will always be there, like.  No sense ticking them off just for the sake of it.  Turning round if you feel you should is almost always the right decision :thup:

How much snow is there up there at the minute?  And at what sort of level does it become unavoidable?

Roughly 800m.  If you've got crampons it's no a problem.  I don't but we still managed to get to the top by digging our heels in as we climbed.  That wasn't the problem.  Visibility and the strength of the wind were the problem.  The decision had to be made at the top of Carn Gorm because if we'd gone for the second munro then we were pretty much committed.  We couldn't see anything to take a compass bearing and i'm never comfortable trying to plan a route based on where north is on the compass and on the map, you're introducing an element of guesswork when you do that and under the circumstances that just wasn't good enough.

I saw on Walkhighlands that somebody did Driesh and Mayar today with no snow, no cloud and prefect visibility.  We were just unlucky, these things happen.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 February 2012, 08:57:26 PM
Aye, you're never sure.  Lake mountains are the same; you can be climbing a perfectly clear Great Gable and Scafell Pike, about two miles away and only about 70 metres higher, can be in cloud.

I'm a cowardly walker at heart (I go myself almost all the time, so I have to be careful.. at least, that's what I tell myself) and in the face of something like that, I'd always turn around and go back another day (quite apart from the discomfort of walking in those conditions).  You should get youself some crampons, though.. you never want the snow to end once you've got them on :lol:  And (in my view, at least), the rating system is designed more to make you spend £200 on a pair of Scarpas than anything else.  Something like the Grivel G10s which I use fitted perfectly well on a non-crampon-rated boot (and the Grivel Monte Rosas for about £60 look almost exactly the same tbh, other than not having the classic yellow binding).  As long as you're not front-pointing up a frozen waterfall, they can make all the difference.

800 metres sounds good.  Fingers crossed for no more significant falls (forlorn hope, like).  I can do plenty at and under that level around Torridon.  Sometimes just looking at the munros is enough :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Thursday 1 March 2012, 06:33:53 PM
anyone got as GPRS ? tempted, as much for geocaching with the kids. are you missing much by not having colour maps etc ? recommendations and reviews please.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 14 March 2012, 07:10:01 PM
I use a cheap B&W Garmin thing, never go to the mountains without it.  They're wonderful things, but not a replacement for map and compass tbh.. just a nice extra fallback.  Would have thought that using GPS is a bit of a cheat for geocaching tbh..?  Is it not all about the orienteering?

An Teallach done (one of the subsidiary summits, which is enough for me), Beinn Eighe done (just one of the munros: again, enough).  Both in grim low cloud and rain with no view to speak of, but the boot worn paths were too clear to lose.  Slioch tomorrow and I can go home happy on Friday :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 22 March 2012, 12:26:17 PM
Went for an absolutely epic walk across the three highest Cheviots yesterday (Cheviot, Hedgehope, Comb Fell).  Wonderful hills, although it's up there with the most tiring walks I've done due to the nature of some of the terrain.  Saw two other people in six hours.

Any fellow Cheviot walkers here (I know there's a couple of you): Langleeford -> Scald Hill -> Cheviot -> Cairn Hill -> Comb Fell -> Hedgehope -> Long Crag -> Langleeford is well worth a go, although the peat hags between Cairn Hill and Hedgehope will make you want to kill things :)  And if you're still reading, I would recommend going up to Cheviot via the Hawsen Burn path rather than straight up Scald Hill.

Don't know why I didn't take more pictures, but still:

Hawsen Burn path
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7122/6859464190_b125b5bbec_b.jpg)

Broadhope Hill
(http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6228/6859464738_187ed491a3_b.jpg)

Windy Gyle from a different viewpoint than usual
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7124/7005584785_8f03fdf363_b.jpg)

From Long Crag toward Tathey Crags
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7235/7005585095_70f1411783_b.jpg)

From Long Crag toward.. I'm not sure.  I'm guessing it's Dunmoor Hill.
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7255/6859465630_ae758b5c45_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 22 March 2012, 12:30:39 PM
Always fancied climbing cheviot , as its the only hill i see on a daily basis. until madras told me not to bother as its too boggy.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 22 March 2012, 01:48:41 PM
It's extremely boggy, but there is one exceptionally good way up (pay £10 at Sale & Partners in Wooler, drive up the private College Valley and approach it by way of Hen Hole or the ridge to the south west of Hen Hole).  Still one or two soft spots, but there's a wooden path over the worst of it on the top and the huge benefit is that you get to Cairn Hill summit first (just about 30 metres lower than the main top) and can realistically just stop there if you don't like the look of the paved bit to the very top - the experience does not improve between Cairn Hill and the proper summit.

The way I went yesterday was a necessary evil to do the horseshoe around the Harthope valley and to be honest it wasn't so bad as usual.  If you take a dog, though, keep an eye on it in case it disappears into a bubbling peaty pool.. I had to haul one of mine out yesterday.

Hedgehope is a better hill to climb, though, and feels more like you're on top of something.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Thursday 22 March 2012, 01:50:47 PM
If you take a dog, though, keep an eye on it in case it disappears into a bubbling peaty pool.. I had to haul one of mine out yesterday.

:lol: Suddenly not as interested in this hill walking lark anymore.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 22 March 2012, 01:57:27 PM
If you take a dog, though, keep an eye on it in case it disappears into a bubbling peaty pool.. I had to haul one of mine out yesterday.

:lol: Suddenly not as interested in this hill walking lark anymore.

:lol:

This only really applies in certain selected areas of the Cheviots and Scotland tbh, but you do need to keep an eye on them (not least for sheep, and farmers).  Not so much of an issue in the Lakes, although there are mountains with old exposed mine workings on them which are probably worse than bubbling peaty bogs :)

And to be honest cp40, if you can see Cheviot on a daily basis it's fairly well certain that you can see Hedgehope as well, sitting just to the right of it (and looking altogether more shapely).  Like this:

(http://i40.tinypic.com/2cde79c.jpg)

Assuming you're south of the hills; if you're out West somewhere, you might not see Hedgehope at all, right enough.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 24 March 2012, 07:53:50 PM
 :lol:  yep thats the shape I can see from Rake lane, and driving round the area- great in winter when its white.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 24 March 2012, 10:05:26 PM

You see that slope on the right (East) of Hedgehope?  Looks like nowt at all.  Absolute killer, a longer and harder ascent than most Lake District paths :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 7 May 2012, 10:28:47 PM

Three days until first Scottish camping of the year

:megusta:

Weather permitting of course :yao:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Monday 7 May 2012, 11:08:10 PM
Heading out camping this coming weekend.  You camp right on the river and float down it for hours where a bus picks you up and takes you back to your camp spots.  Totally stoked.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Cajun on Monday 7 May 2012, 11:19:43 PM
You camp on the river?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Monday 7 May 2012, 11:22:56 PM
You camp on the river?

River banks.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Saturday 23 June 2012, 05:53:02 AM
Been spending the week in Colorado with the family.  Went on an almost eight mile hike at 9200ish feet.  This was the present at the end:

(http://i.imgur.com/Hho3j.jpg)

Taken with my iphone so it's not great quality and really there is no type of photography that can do this kind of place justice.  On the Colorado River at an abandoned mining city called Lulu City.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: POOT on Saturday 23 June 2012, 09:12:25 AM
There's an old western scene if I've ever seen one :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 23 June 2012, 09:14:03 AM
There's an old western scene if I've ever seen one :thup:


looks lush like.


hope the f*** we get some dry weekends this school summer break.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ted Maul on Saturday 23 June 2012, 10:06:54 AM
I did the Coast to Coast walk a few years ago, St Bees to Robin Hoods Bay, took 2 weeks and was thouroughly enjoyable. You can divert from the path when walking through the Lake District and do a few big climbs/walks, although I missed out on Striding Edge due to the weather - my arse was pretty happy about that though :lol:

(http://www.pashuk.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/packhorse-map2.jpg)

Did a mixture of camping & BB's along the way, would love to do the whole thing camping next time.

Nice mate, yeah me and a mate did a coast to coast walk a couple of years back and we had a great time as well.  Ours was a bit shorter mind, did Whitehaven to Tynemouth.  The daft b****** didn't book enough time off graft though so we had to get it done in five days working out at about 30 miles a day on average so 10 hours of walking a day, fine for the first few days but last couple of days were utter murder.

At the end of the penultimate day at about 9pm we reached Hexham and were going to set up camp there but it was looking light still so we decided to keep going and stop off at home instead so we had less to do the next day, after all it would only take 'a couple of hours'.  Slight inaccuracy considering I stumbled into my house at 5am feet destroyed by blisters, setting off for Tynemouth in the morning was one of the hardest things I've ever had to do, could barely get my feet into my shoes the next day ffs.

We've been hatching a plan to do Land's End to John O'Groats for a while now but getting the time to do it is going to be tough considering it's 838 miles on the shortest route whereas our last one was about 130 :lol: cycling would certainly be a more realistic option.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 23 June 2012, 10:28:39 AM

Have always thought I'd love to walk John O'Groats to Lands End but tbh once you're past Derbyshire the country is pretty f***ing dull, really, and only a forced diversion through Wales would cheer it up (while making it much longer).  Only so many fields and motorways you can take :)

And very nice Cubaricho.  I hope you climbed the hill in the picture :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 23 June 2012, 10:32:09 AM
At the end of the penultimate day at about 9pm we reached Hexham and were going to set up camp there but it was looking light still so we decided to keep going and stop off at home instead so we had less to do the next day, after all it would only take 'a couple of hours'.  Slight inaccuracy considering I stumbled into my house at 5am feet destroyed by blisters, setting off for Tynemouth in the morning was one of the hardest things I've ever had to do, could barely get my feet into my shoes the next day ffs.

Ooooof, btw >_<  Where was home?  Newcastle?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ted Maul on Saturday 23 June 2012, 10:37:34 AM
Have always thought I'd love to walk John O'Groats to Lands End but tbh once you're past Derbyshire the country is pretty f***ing dull, really, and only a forced diversion through Wales would cheer it up (while making it much longer).  Only so many fields and motorways you can take :)

Aye, we've always said we'll do it from Land's End to John O' Groats because of that very reason tbh.  Same thing happened on our coast to coast, started off at Whitehaven and took all sorts of pleasant detours hill climbing and scenery-gazing and it just wasn't as good after that.

Also it'll be a lot easier to get to Land's End by public transport in the first place because John O'Groats  is in the middle of butt f*** nowhere.  What we'll do after getting there, well I don't know but we'd work something out.

Ooooof, btw >_<  Where was home?  Newcastle?

Near Blaydon, so not quite as bad as having to walk to town on top of that, haha.  Alston to Ryton was quite enough for one day, says 28 miles or something by road but it was a hell of a lot more the route we took.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 11 July 2012, 10:57:12 AM
Does anyone have any experience of wild camping in the Galloway Forest Park in South West Scotland? Planning a trip there soon as its not too far from border, thinking of camping by Loch Bradan, or maybe Loch Doon or Loch Ken.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jimburst on Wednesday 11 July 2012, 01:29:50 PM
I did the Coast to Coast walk a few years ago, St Bees to Robin Hoods Bay, took 2 weeks and was thouroughly enjoyable. You can divert from the path when walking through the Lake District and do a few big climbs/walks, although I missed out on Striding Edge due to the weather - my arse was pretty happy about that though :lol:

(http://www.pashuk.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/packhorse-map2.jpg)

Did a mixture of camping & BB's along the way, would love to do the whole thing camping next time.

Kirkby! Kirkby! Kirkby!

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jimburst on Wednesday 11 July 2012, 01:31:17 PM
f*** this.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 July 2012, 06:51:48 PM
Does anyone have any experience of wild camping in the Galloway Forest Park in South West Scotland? Planning a trip there soon as its not too far from border, thinking of camping by Loch Bradan, or maybe Loch Doon or Loch Ken.

Never been there, but the spot around point 384 (around NX441980) between Loch Bradan and Loch Finlas looks a likely area.  May be busy this time of year, but looks to be plenty of space and not too far from the roads.  Have a good time :thup:

I'm heading back up to Torridon before too much longer, and also planning a wild camp somewhere around the Rothiemurchus Forest to get up toward Braeriach / Ben Macdui.

f*** this.

f*** what?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 11 July 2012, 06:57:59 PM
anybody camping in this s*** needs help.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Wednesday 11 July 2012, 07:15:36 PM
wild camping = primitive camping I'll assume?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 July 2012, 09:45:13 PM

= putting your tent wherever seems most appropriate, not paying for the privilege or having any amenities nearby.  Would be my definition, anyway :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 12 July 2012, 07:51:52 PM
Does anyone have any experience of wild camping in the Galloway Forest Park in South West Scotland? Planning a trip there soon as its not too far from border, thinking of camping by Loch Bradan, or maybe Loch Doon or Loch Ken.

Never been there, but the spot around point 384 (around NX441980) between Loch Bradan and Loch Finlas looks a likely area.  May be busy this time of year, but looks to be plenty of space and not too far from the roads.  Have a good time :thup:

I'm heading back up to Torridon before too much longer, and also planning a wild camp somewhere around the Rothiemurchus Forest to get up toward Braeriach / Ben Macdui.


On what map is this a reference for?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 12 July 2012, 08:13:51 PM
Not sure tbh, I use Memory Map.. looks to be toward the top of 1:25,000 OS sheet 318 (http://www.shop.ordnancesurveyleisure.co.uk/products/paper-maps/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain-os-explorer-map/galloway-forest-park-north/pid-9780319238424)

Or look here http://www.streetmap.co.uk/map.srf?x=244455&y=597795&z=120&sv=244455,597795&st=4&ar=y&mapp=map.srf&searchp=ids.srf&dn=691&ax=244455&ay=597795&lm=0 (http://www.streetmap.co.uk/map.srf?x=244455&y=597795&z=120&sv=244455,597795&st=4&ar=y&mapp=map.srf&searchp=ids.srf&dn=691&ax=244455&ay=597795&lm=0)

Over toward Loch Finlas looks flat and reasonably remote (insofar as you get remote places South of the Highlands).
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Thursday 12 July 2012, 08:55:09 PM

= putting your tent wherever seems most appropriate, not paying for the privilege or having any amenities nearby.  Would be my definition, anyway :)

Yeah we call that primitive camping over here.  I figured as much.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Thursday 12 July 2012, 10:30:15 PM
Not sure tbh, I use Memory Map.. looks to be toward the top of 1:25,000 OS sheet 318 (http://www.shop.ordnancesurveyleisure.co.uk/products/paper-maps/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain-os-explorer-map/galloway-forest-park-north/pid-9780319238424)

Or look here http://www.streetmap.co.uk/map.srf?x=244455&y=597795&z=120&sv=244455,597795&st=4&ar=y&mapp=map.srf&searchp=ids.srf&dn=691&ax=244455&ay=597795&lm=0 (http://www.streetmap.co.uk/map.srf?x=244455&y=597795&z=120&sv=244455,597795&st=4&ar=y&mapp=map.srf&searchp=ids.srf&dn=691&ax=244455&ay=597795&lm=0)

Over toward Loch Finlas looks flat and reasonably remote (insofar as you get remote places South of the Highlands).
NX on OS maps is South west Scotland. Try OL 310, 311, 312,317,318 or 320.


edit, in fact stick those co-ords in here. http://www.shop.ordnancesurveyleisure.co.uk/products/paper-maps/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain/free-booklet (http://www.shop.ordnancesurveyleisure.co.uk/products/paper-maps/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain/free-booklet)

edit again, going further....http://www.shop.ordnancesurveyleisure.co.uk/products/paper-maps/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain-os-explorer-map/galloway-forest-park-north/pid-9780319238424 (http://www.shop.ordnancesurveyleisure.co.uk/products/paper-maps/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain/paper-maps-ordnance-survey-great-britain-os-explorer-map/galloway-forest-park-north/pid-9780319238424)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Friday 20 July 2012, 04:27:03 PM
Anybody know any low-ish tralis around ullswater?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 20 July 2012, 04:31:30 PM
Wainwright said that the path on the East bank by Place Fell was the loveliest walk in the lakes, and he knew his stuff :)  You can also start high around the Kirkstone Inn if you're trying to avoid gradients (separate walk, obv)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Friday 20 July 2012, 04:34:48 PM
Wainwright said that the path on the East bank by Place Fell was the loveliest walk in the lakes, and he knew his stuff :)  You can also start high around the Kirkstone Inn if you're trying to avoid gradients.

good call- that the one opposite the ferry landing at glen ridding? seen people on it a thousand times, always been higher- taking a off roader pram tmrw to introduce the bairn, hopefully hire a canoe as well.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 20 July 2012, 06:12:52 PM

That's the one.. Patterdale to Sandwick, or as much of it is feasible.  Enjoy :thup:  Never done it myself; let me know what it's like.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Friday 20 July 2012, 06:42:19 PM

That's the one.. Patterdale to Sandwick, or as much of it is feasible.  Enjoy :thup:  Never done it myself; let me know what it's like.


not sure its feesible witha pram having seen some pics, ringing round trying to get a baby carrier rucksack tonight, and my lass has lost her boots. christ.

edit barton fell, with me and the boy doing a higher bit is looking a possibilty.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 22 July 2012, 07:02:18 PM

Getting ready to go back up to Torridon for a weekend sometime soon :smitten:

Beinn Alligin this time \o/

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8021/7623457732_a09fb4196b_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 22 July 2012, 07:08:22 PM
looks nice, ended up on the fells over ullswater yesterday so my lass and little un could do first mile or so from pooley bridge onto barton fell. then me and the boy did Arthurs pike and Bonscale pike. Still really enjoyed it not going so far/ high. weather was lovely, off the paths the ground was very wet.  had to change boots anarl, just cant walk in my brashers.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 26 July 2012, 06:57:09 PM
Torridon booked for three nights in mid-August :smitten:  right at the foot of Liathach.  No excuse :scared:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 26 July 2012, 07:03:01 PM
Torridon booked for three nights in mid-August :smitten:  right at the foot of Liathach.  No excuse :scared:

pics
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 26 July 2012, 07:04:56 PM
Of where it is? Of Liathach?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 26 July 2012, 07:08:43 PM
Of where it is? Of Liathach?

Is it the very sharp edge scary rock  :lol:you posted pics of previously?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 26 July 2012, 07:09:08 PM
Image fail :(

Liathach is fairly well the most beautiful mountain in Scotland.  Will find a picture :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 26 July 2012, 07:16:54 PM
One of my own from last time I could see the top of it

(http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6225/6304776393_42786df458_b.jpg)

Not one of mine, this is the ridge on the top...

(http://www.stevenfallon.co.uk/photos/liathach/photo6.jpg)

...which, needless to say, I will not be traversing :lol:

Torridon village, where the B&B is, sits right under Liathach thusly:

(http://www.billycurriephotography.co.uk/images/Torridon_Village_F66E2835-1E4F-37DC-713292840EFFAA98.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 26 July 2012, 07:20:17 PM
looks like full on mountaineering that like :lol:

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 26 July 2012, 07:33:16 PM
There are easy ways to the mountains at the east and west (well, I say "easy"..).  Just the ridge between them is a horror.  There are a couple of really great pictures of the path which bypasses the ridge which I'll try to find later :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 29 July 2012, 06:08:24 PM
I thought this was worthy of two threads :lol:

From the top of Cheviot a couple of hours ago.  Never great to see something like this blowing your way.

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8154/7669900754_2df787a9b9_b.jpg)

:scared:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 2 August 2012, 12:33:35 PM
Just got back yesterday from a three night wild camp in the Galloway Forest Park. Had a great time; what a little adventure/ordeal it was!

I am pretty much a novice to wild camping and have never visited this part of Scotland before so I had tried to scout out some nice, easily accessable places on the net to try for two adults and two kids. But due to my inexperiance/ignorance I had mixed success with this idea  :lol:

After much umming and arring, I had decided that Loch Dee was the place to be.  From what I could gather it was accessable by car on the Southern Upland Way. Nice. So we rock up at Dalry at about 1pm and take the minor road up through Garroch to where the Southern Upland Way Begins.....hmmm the road is a bit narrow but it is ok were my initial thoughts. Then we entered onto the SUW, where the nice narrow road became a narrow road made of loose rock.....not ideal but not too bad. Then we reach a farm where the loose rock road becomes a hilly dirt track with huge rocks and massive puddles. Now, bearing in mind that I am driving a Vauxhall Corsa, fully loaded with gear and 4 bodies, the next decision I made now looks to have been somewhat rash. "f*** it" I said, " I am not going back now, lets keep going". I immediately regretted this decision as we went through a puddle and over a rock ripping something off the bottom of my car and nearly flipping the bloody thing on its side. What a bellend I am.

After panicking like f*** I tell everyone to get out to raise the car a little and manage to do a 20 point turn and head back the way we came.  That was Loch Dee f***ed.

Right, next stop, Loch Bradan. From what I could gather, this place should have plenty of nice camping spots going off Google Earth. I had also read of a guy and his family camping there too so I decided to try and find his spot and camp there. Again the roads were just passable in my little city car but it was doing it no good at all and I was wincing with every little crunch and pop. After about an hour of searching, I couldnt find a suitible spot as the ground was just so boggy it was unreal. By this time, it was about 5pm, lashing down and we were all distinctly p*ssed off.

I had always known that I'd find a spot by Loch Doon so with time getting on, we had to head there. I wish I had just done this in the first place!, The first two spots we decided on at Loch Doon were midgie hell, (Thanks Go Outdoors for selling me insect repellant for £9 that doesnt even f***ing work on the little b******s! :dave:) But the third spot we picked was spot on! From then on we had an absolutely brilliant time. I loved the isolation and cant wait to get away somewhere up Scotland again.  :thup:

The spot:
(http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/9185/20120730175721.jpg)

The spot, with Tent:

(http://img543.imageshack.us/img543/1098/20120730175641.jpg)

Fire:

(http://img818.imageshack.us/img818/4070/imag0275k.jpg)

Moon on Loch Doon:

(http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/4600/20120730230113.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 2 August 2012, 04:00:11 PM

Great stuff and nice photos, looks lovely :thup:  There's nothing like a proper wild camp away from every f***er else and with no amenities.

Nothing works on midges, though.  Nothing at all.  People will tell you "jungle formula" and people will tell you "Avon Skin So Soft".  It's bollocks.  If they want to swarm around you and bite you, they will swarm around you and bite you.  Torridon, where I'm going next weekend, is the worst place I've ever been for them.  Going in the middle of August :yao:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 2 August 2012, 04:03:50 PM
do mossie nets not keep the t***s off?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 2 August 2012, 04:09:50 PM

Aye they do, but you have to go outside sometimes or you might as well have stayed at home :)

A suppose a bee-keeper style outfit might do it as well, but they're a bit cumbersome for climbing mountains in.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: POOT on Thursday 2 August 2012, 04:10:51 PM
Where would be a good place to sell a tent?

Gumtree is one and eBay is a no go as I only want £20.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 2 August 2012, 04:12:28 PM

Aye they do, but you have to go outside sometimes or you might as well have stayed at home :)

A suppose a bee-keeper style outfit might do it as well, but they're a bit cumbersome for climbing mountains in.


I was thinking the hats with the drop down nets, ive got one somewhere, never used it tho.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 2 August 2012, 04:13:01 PM
Where would be a good place to sell a tent?

Gumtree is one and eBay is a no go as I only want £20.

are you in north east? facebook camping shop.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: POOT on Thursday 2 August 2012, 04:14:14 PM
I am. :)

Facebook camping shop? Will have a search...
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 8 August 2012, 07:30:16 PM

mwis.org.uk reporting first day of my Torridon break (Friday) has 80% chance of cloud free summits, second day has 90% chance of cloud free summits :frantic: :frantic: :frantic:  It can p*ss down all day on Sunday for me if those two work out OK :)

Never been so excited for a holiday in my entire life :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: La Parka on Wednesday 8 August 2012, 07:55:05 PM
Going up Inglebrough tomorrow.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: La Parka on Thursday 9 August 2012, 09:48:18 PM
Going up Inglebrough tomorrow.

just walked 13 miles up and round Inglebrough. Shame 7 of it was in the complete wrong direction, and we had to flag down a lovely man called mike to take us to our car and save us from the nightfall/8km hike to the car!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 9 August 2012, 10:33:47 PM

:lol:

Noble effort :)  Did you enjoy it all the same?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 10 August 2012, 08:15:27 PM
This place :smitten:

There is no more beautiful place in the world than Glen Torridon.  There can't be.  When the sun is out and the sky is blue (which is new to me) and the place is full of dragonflies and golden eagles, it's like another planet :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Friday 10 August 2012, 08:18:01 PM
This place :smitten:

There is no more beautiful place in the world than Glen Torridon.  There can't be.  When the sun is out and the sky is blue (which is new to me) and the place is full of dragonflies and golden eagles, it's like another planet :)


enjoy. sooooo jelly.
gutted we couldnt get away this weekend. weather is spot on, but ive got s*** on tmrw am.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: La Parka on Saturday 11 August 2012, 12:36:01 AM
It was awesome. We got to the summit in the first 2 hours, then got lost on the top and took the total wrong path down. We worked out our position on the os map, tried to recover but we were knackered and had done 12 miles already. Woulda made it to the car eventually but for 30 mins or so it was so demorilising! Probably not safe to walk on the road aft dark either.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Disco on Saturday 11 August 2012, 01:01:45 AM
I'm ignorant as f*** RE: this, can you just do camp where you want in the Lakes/wherever if you want?

Quote fancy going to the Lakes at some point, not done it justice.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Saturday 11 August 2012, 01:03:06 AM
I'm ignorant as f*** RE: this, can you just do camp where you want in the Lakes/wherever if you want?

Quote fancy going to the Lakes at some point, not done it justice.
http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/visiting/accommodationbookonline/wildcamping (http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/visiting/accommodationbookonline/wildcamping)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Disco on Saturday 11 August 2012, 01:06:00 AM
I'm ignorant as f*** RE: this, can you just do camp where you want in the Lakes/wherever if you want?

Quote fancy going to the Lakes at some point, not done it justice.
http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/visiting/accommodationbookonline/wildcamping (http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/visiting/accommodationbookonline/wildcamping)

:thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Saturday 11 August 2012, 01:08:52 AM
around tarns tend to be wild camping hotspots. ask open c he knows more about this. I haven't done it since I were a kid.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 11 August 2012, 02:16:03 PM
Never done it in England because of dubious legality.. seen plenty of folk doing it round Scafell Pike/Great End area, around Sprinkling Tarn way.

Been along the Beinn Alligin ridge this morning.  Stunning, but very hard work in the heat (makes a change).  Afternoon of drinking Stella and playing ukulele on the banks of Loch Torridon awaits :smitten:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Saturday 11 August 2012, 04:35:28 PM
I have wild camped right on Ullswater shore in the lakes once last year and once this year. Both times the park ranger bloke came round in the morning about half 8 and tapped on our tent and said no overnight camping here and then went after we acknowledged him. No problem really. If you leave early in the morning then you'd easily have no problems wild camping. Its just too busy though the lakes; thats why I recomend the Galloway Forest Park, the other side of the Solway Firth instead; Far more remote and almost as beautiful.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 11 August 2012, 04:56:07 PM
I have wild camped right on Ullswater shore in the lakes once last year and once this year. Both times the park ranger bloke came round in the morning about half 8 and tapped on our tent and said no overnight camping here and then went after we acknowledged him. No problem really. If you leave early in the morning then you'd easily have no problems wild camping. Its just too busy though the lakes; thats why I recomend the Galloway Forest Park, the other side of the Solway Firth instead; Far more remote and almost as beautiful.


surprised at that like. were you in the laybys heading towards glenriding? bben on them shores often and had bbqs, little beach fires, often fancied wild camping there. trouble is with kids/lass luxuries are a necessity really. Had a camper conversion for my people carrier and tried to camp in a layby near pooley bridge last year, but got bored  and ended up driving home at 9pm. :lol:
Title: Re: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 11 August 2012, 07:16:36 PM
Its just too busy though the lakes; thats why I recomend the Galloway Forest Park, the other side of the Solway Firth instead; Far more remote and almost as beautiful.

:thup:

Or up here in Torridon, which is more remote and significantly more beautiful (but a seven hour drive from Newcastle, sadly).  Lakes is crazy in the summer; I only go there these days when the mountains are under snow.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 13 August 2012, 01:39:13 PM
Lot of work to do on the Torridon pictures (including this one), but this is the most amazing summit cairn I've ever sat at :smitten:

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8306/7775500742_de33ca4c65_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: POOT on Monday 13 August 2012, 02:23:27 PM
Now THAT'S a landscape photo :clap:

Best to date...by a long way :snod:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 13 August 2012, 02:25:05 PM

Cheers man :)  Quality of landscape photo all depends how far you can be arsed to drive and then climb, really :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: POOT on Monday 13 August 2012, 02:29:00 PM
I know what you mean...but a good photo is different from a good view.

That's framed so well :snod:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 13 August 2012, 02:31:31 PM
From three shots, I didn't get as much sky or foreground as I'd have liked but it came out nice all the same :thup:  Cheers again.  You wouldn't believe how good the actual view was (which didn't appear until the last second of climbing), I actually said "Jesus f***ing Christ look at that" out loud, to nobody, completely by accident :lol:

Then I put my camera away and walked over the rest of the ridge, which consists of the two mountains on the left foreground (the climb to there wasn't so bad but it was harder work after that so the camera stayed away in the interests of not falling off the side).  Was a stunning walk, but the day was almost too hot for it.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 13 August 2012, 02:40:57 PM

Oh, and since this is the Great Outdoors thread I should probably have pointed out that this is the summit of Tom na Gruagaich, one of the munros of Beinn Alligin.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:11:09 PM
These are the pictures I take just to remember the places I've been, rather than for Proper Photography purposes.  Just thought I'd put them up here to demonstrate the finest bit of Scotland (IMHO) and how it is for walkers.  Anybody who likes their outdoors and finds themselves with a couple of spare days and a sunny forecast in North West Scotland owes themselves the £80 that two nights in a B&B will set them back around Torridon area :)

When you're following paths up there, it's generally not too bad at all.  To get to the summit that I took the picture up the page from, there was a path of this sort of quality most of the way:
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8427/7790444446_b711b5ba3f_b.jpg)

A couple of places lower down you have to cross rock steps which need the use of hands and arms to pull up, but with no individual steps bigger than about 3' and no unbroken drops of more than about 8', so not too terrifying.  Once you're in the corrie above, the need to use your hands disappears so they're a bit of a tester, really: like those theme park height limit signposts that say "you must be this brave to climb this mountain".

When you get up into the corrie you can see in that picture, the path deteriorates into rubble - still perfectly visible in bad weather, I'd imagine, but a lot less steady under the feet and getting increasingly steeper as you go up.  Not so steep that you ever feel unsafe (I've felt worse on, for example, the scree runs up to Scafell Pike and Bowfell, and the path up to High Crag and down from Buttermere Red Pike, all in the Lakes), although I should imagine it feels slightly worse on descent.  This is the view from the corrie looking back to where I took the picture above:
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8308/7790442642_6334d6580a_b.jpg)

You've seen the summit picture, I won't post it again.  After the first summit (Tom na Gruagaich) things get a bit more serious, with a 200 metre descent then re-ascent on an appreciably narrow ridge.  The camera went in the pack at this point and didn't come out again, in the interests of self-preservation (and also I was far too hot and running out of water, and wanted to get down as quickly as I could).

After getting over the second (and main) summit of Sgurr Mhor, toward the end of the walk you have to cross the 'horns of Alligin' (the three pinnacles on the summit picture), the scrambling is a bit more serious - again there are no individual steps of more than about 4' (at least, on the way I found down there weren't), and they're more successions of rock steps than they are proper rock faces but because you're so high up and because the edges drop away so steeply, they feel much more serious than they actually are.  There's a bypass path that runs around the sides of them, but to be honest given the choice between four limbs on solid rock above a drop or two limbs on slippery grass above the same drop, the rock was the less scary choice :lol:

I didn't take so many on Beinn Eighe the second day because it was hazy and because for all the good parts of the walk the sun was directly overhead and made everything impossible to light properly.  I did get this fearsome side on view of the Liathach ridge, though, which looked scary from on top but which possibly looks even worse from this angle :lol:

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7254/7790441478_5d002e6c7d_b.jpg)

Looking at the map (which I can do for hours), there are a lot of ways up onto the ridges without following the paths - a lot of the time, there are fairly easy contours leading up there.  When you get there, though, it feels impossible to go off-route.  The combination of heathery slopes and rock outcrops are very off-putting; this is the sort of view you get, and they tend to make you think, "you know what?  I'll just stick to the path".

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8282/7790440124_52aff20f54_b.jpg)

Ross Magoo, if you're still reading: have you been up there?  You've got far more munros in than I have, just wondered how Torridon compares to somebody who's been all over the country.  It's easy to be overwhelmed by how big and beautiful it is when you're used to the Cheviots and the Lakes, but I can feel myself being continually drawn back there and that'd be a shame if there are other places just as worthwhile.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:15:00 PM
I'm coming over and you're taking me on a hike OpenC.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:17:59 PM
I always fancy going hiking when I open this thread. Some people seem to spend their time in gorgeous places.

Realistically though I don't have any gear and don't want to be one of those t***s that just rocks up unprepared and has to be rescued. :blush:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:18:34 PM
Give me a shout when you get to Newcastle, Cuba.. I'll come and pick you up and drive us up there :) 

It's a lovely place, and coupled with the distinct advantage that the mountains are high enough to feel a proper sense of achievement, but low enough to be able to get back to your car (and bed) at the end of the day :lol:  This (not to mention the significant expense) is what puts me off going to the bigger ranges in the world - two or three nights of camping or sleeping in mountain huts wouldn't do for me :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:23:12 PM
Realistically though I don't have any gear and don't want to be one of those t***s that just rocks up unprepared and has to be rescued. :blush:

:lol:  It's amazing how far most of those people get.  As I've posted before, I saw somebody going up and down Scafell Pike, under snow, in wellies :lol:  Have also seen some pitiful sights on Ben Nevis and the likes, though, of people who didn't realise that it was actually going to be difficult, and take six or seven hours.. people in tears due to pain/cold/heat/lack of water/all of the above 100 metres below the summit with three hours still to walk >_<

Really, as long as you're waterproof and have decent boots you can't go too far wrong in the summer.  A bit of map reading skill helps, but generally Google Earth and internet routes are so good these days that I rarely need to take my map out of my bag.  I can think of three or four occasions in the last three years (and that'll be getting on for 100, 150 hill walks) that I've felt the need to check where I am.  Explore the area in advance on Google Earth or similar, and you get a feel for the surrounding hills and where you are.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:26:12 PM


Realistically though I don't have any gear and don't want to be one of those t***s that just rocks up unprepared and has to be rescued. :blush:


wasnt a couple without equipment lost on scafell pike for days just last week?   also didnt catch the full story but somebody fell? off arthurs pike- and was air lifted,  that was the last hill i was on.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:34:11 PM

Somebody managed to die falling off High Street a couple of months ago, f*** knows how they managed that.

People often get into trouble on Scafell Pike.. under cloud, the top 200 metres all looks the same and some of it leads into gullies on the Wasdale/Sty Head side which are notoriously difficult to get out of.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:34:49 PM
Buying some hiking boots and waterproofs would be a start. :lol: Need to get wor lad on board really, I like my own company but not up a mountain.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:37:13 PM

Somebody managed to die falling off High Street a couple of months ago, f*** knows how they managed that.

People often get into trouble on Scafell Pike.. under cloud, the top 200 metres all looks the same and some of it leads into gullies on the Wasdale/Sty Head side which are notoriously difficult to get out of.


fkin hell, missed that, one of my fav hills, been up a few times. cant imagine how to fall off its quite round. that bit overlooking hayeswater has a canny drop to it like.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:40:13 PM

Oh, man.. there is nothing in this world like going for a six or seven hour walk on your own (or with dogs).  It's beautiful.  Although maybe potentially fearsome if you're not used to it, admittedly :)

Don't worry about spending a fortune on stuff, though.  Layers of t-shirts and fleeces are enough to keep you warm in most weather, and a £10 packable kagoul on top of that lot is enough to make you waterproof (packable overtrousers are also a good idea).  A cheap pair of gloves and a cheap hat are always worth carrying.  Boots or comfortable shoes are the most important thing :)

Give it a go :thup:  It's good for the soul, and you lot in Newcastle are just an hour or so away from the bottom of Blencathra, the best mountain in the Lakes :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:41:04 PM
fkin hell, missed that, one of my fav hills, been up a few times. cant imagine how to fall off its quite round. that bit overlooking hayeswater has a canny drop to it like.

Aye, I think that's where it was.  You would have to actively put yourself in a position to fall off, though.. it's not exactly a razor thin arete.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:44:35 PM
great pics open c, when i get the wife used to the lakes i'll try getting her up there.

anyway you mentioned the scree run up to bowfell, right, last year i had to lift the dog (border terrier) up a couple of bits going up to red tarn (not that one, the one between pike o blisco and crinkle crags) and going up to pavey ark. I was planning on red tarn-crinkle crags-bowfell as my biggie soon, how bad would you say that scree is for a small mut ? i was just planning on coming back down the band ?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:49:57 PM
Going up to Red Tarn from Oxendale/Great Langdale, or from the Wrynose Pass side..?  Some of the ways up from Langdale are quite steep, and I haven't had my dogs over that way - once you get to the Crinkles, though, there's nothing too appalling (unless you fancy the Bad Step, which isn't particularly hard but which feels a bit false since there are other perfectly good ways up).

The walk you're talking about is the hardest one I've ever done in the Lakes (although I went on toward Esk Pike and came down by Ore Gap/Angle Tarn/Rossett Gill, which as long as you're reasonably fit I would recommend over going down The Band, as long as you're parked at Old Dungeon Ghyll).. the scree run, though, is absolutely fine for dogs, and it actually doesn't take a lot of time to ascend or descend.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:50:18 PM
fkin hell, missed that, one of my fav hills, been up a few times. cant imagine how to fall off its quite round. that bit overlooking hayeswater has a canny drop to it like.

Aye, I think that's where it was.  You would have to actively put yourself in a position to fall off, though.. it's not exactly a razor thin arete.

shocked tbh, I have to say that is one of my favourite views in the lakes. looking down on hayeswater.   guess somebody got too far over.  :(
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 09:52:56 PM
Quote from: The Guardian
The north has lost a leading figure in public transport and charitable work with the death of Peter Huntley in a mountaineering accident in the Lake District.

The former managing director of Go North East fell 200ft on Sunday afternoon near Blea Water, the deepest mountain tarn in the national park which is overlooked by steep crags.

He was getting fit for a planned fund-raising expedition to the North Pole when he lost his footing in snow on the path from the summit of High Street, the 828m (2718ft) mountain topped by a Roman road which lies between Ullswater and Haweswater in the eastern Lakes.

A team from Penrith mountain rescue tried to save the 55-year-old with medical care at the scene, which was hard to reach because of the conditions. Although it was a bright day, the snow and ice at high levels made access difficult and potentially dangerous for the rescuers. But he died at 4pm.

Mountains under snow = serious business
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:00:05 PM


Give it a go :thup:  It's good for the soul, and you lot in Newcastle are just an hour or so away from the bottom of Blencathra, the best mountain in the Lakes :)


yeah been wanting to do blencathra for a while, when I get the boy confident enough. been a s**** year weatherwise tho.


sad about that guy that fell, I keep telling my son, its really most dangerous in snowy, icey conditions.

once got lost in a white out in patterdale in November, and then darkness fell. was completly blind, but managed to find our way down, just as mountain rescue were getting kitted up to come and look for us. :blush:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:07:37 PM


Give it a go :thup:  It's good for the soul, and you lot in Newcastle are just an hour or so away from the bottom of Blencathra, the best mountain in the Lakes :)


yeah been wanting to do blencathra for a while, when I get the boy confident enough. been a s**** year weatherwise tho.


sad about that guy that fell, I keep telling my son, its really most dangerous in snowy, icey conditions.

once got lost in a white out in patterdale in November, and then darkness fell. was completly blind, but managed to find our way down, just as mountain recue were getting kitted up to come and look for us. :blush:

There's a way up Blencathra that takes you all around Sharp Edge so you can watch people going over it, but with no risk to yourself at all because you're on the next ridge over, which is easy and grassy.  A couple of easy steps over rock low down just to add a bit of excitement (nothing difficult or dangerous, though, and if he was to be too unnerved by them you'd only be 10 minutes in), and a couple of places on the way down where the path goes near to a drop but only if you want to go that way.

Only got the 1:50,000k map on my PC but it should be clear enough anyway:

(http://i.imgur.com/q6VIc.jpg)

This was my first Lake District mountain walk, and it hooked me from the start (to the extent that I'm now happy to drive for six or seven hours each way to climb a mountain in Scotland).  In the summer, you can check out the weather forecast, drive over and do it in an afternoon (takes me about three and a half hours up and down).
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:16:15 PM
cheers, deffo on the list, and I couldnt get J over Sharp Edge, tho last time out he had a bit more confidence, was thinking of trying skiddaw to build him up, but I dont think id ever take a car up that rd to latrig again.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:20:07 PM

Blencathra is a million times better than Skiddaw tbh.  And that road is a f***ing nightmare.. trying to get turned up at the top when it's busy :anguish:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:26:34 PM

Blencathra is a million times better than Skiddaw tbh.  And that road is a f***ing nightmare.. trying to get turned up at the top when it's busy :anguish:

ive been told that aye, climbed skiddaw a couple times just cos it was the view from my mams caravan, and all the time I looked at it I wanted to go up it.  foolishly drove up that rd on a bank holiday in a people carrier full , with idiots parked up the verges and all sorts. barley room to get through, no hope of turning back, what a mare, thought I was going to kill us all. :lol: 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:39:13 PM
I always fancy going hiking when I open this thread. Some people seem to spend their time in gorgeous places.

Realistically though I don't have any gear and don't want to be one of those t***s that just rocks up unprepared and has to be rescued. :blush:
don't need much gear, some people have far too much and go way over board. most going up simonside (a good place to start) just go up in trainers and jeans. if you like it then add gradually, pair of boots, then trousers, waterproof, base layer for the winter. i've seen people going to the border ridge as if they were going to the north pole.

map and compass essential most times and i don't go anywhere new without my GPS. (i'm now a wuss as i nevber used to get worried about getting lost)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:43:38 PM
i've seen people going to the border ridge as if they were going to the north pole.

Aye, I saw a bloke a couple of weeks ago on Windy Gyle wearing black fleecy looking trousers, a fleece and a pair of Scarpa Mantas like mine that would take a 12 point crampon :lol:  I was in shorts and a t-shirt, and my pack contained a waterproof fleece, a bottle of water and a bag of midget gems :lol:

Cheap GPS is a good investment, right enough.. I don't use the mapping ones, just a £60 Garmin affair that within 30 seconds of turning it on will tell me where I am on the map to within 5 metres.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:48:51 PM
Going up to Red Tarn from Oxendale/Great Langdale, or from the Wrynose Pass side..?  Some of the ways up from Langdale are quite steep, and I haven't had my dogs over that way - once you get to the Crinkles, though, there's nothing too appalling (unless you fancy the Bad Step, which isn't particularly hard but which feels a bit false since there are other perfectly good ways up).

The walk you're talking about is the hardest one I've ever done in the Lakes (although I went on toward Esk Pike and came down by Ore Gap/Angle Tarn/Rossett Gill, which as long as you're reasonably fit I would recommend over going down The Band, as long as you're parked at Old Dungeon Ghyll).. the scree run, though, is absolutely fine for dogs, and it actually doesn't take a lot of time to ascend or descend.
i was going to from great langdale side, thats the way i went last time and had to carry the dog up a ciuple of bits. i know wrynose is easier but it means driving from the cottage and i'm a non driver, done it last year and she hated wrynose pass. it's more of a time thing as i'll be setting out from chapel stile at first light for a) hopefully have the place to myself and b) be back in time to spend the rest of the day with the family. i'm also considering just going bowfell via the band and down via ore gap (or vice versa) depending on time ?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:49:51 PM

BTW Madras, if you ever see these two on Simonside then do stop me and say hello :lol:

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7014/6580023761_5d4c9a94fd_b.jpg)

I go up there two or three times a week, I feel fairly sure I must have passed you at some point in the last few years :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:52:54 PM

Bowfell by the Band and then down by Ore Gap is a great walk, aye.  It's better to fit the Crinkles in as well, but that makes it a long and tiring day; I can't think of many more difficult climbs in the Lakes than the one up to Red Tarn via Oxendale.  If I was going from Chapel Stile, personally I would just get up Bowfell and leave the Crinkles for a time I could be parked at Old Dungeon Ghyll.  The Band is a much more forgiving ascent than Oxendale - and Rossett Gill is very hard work on the way down as well.  Crinkles + Bowfell + Rossett Gill then back to Chapel Stile is a long, long walk.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10:58:02 PM

Blencathra is a million times better than Skiddaw tbh.  And that road is a f***ing nightmare.. trying to get turned up at the top when it's busy :anguish:

ive been told that aye, climbed skiddaw a couple times just cos it was the view from my mams caravan, and all the time I looked at it I wanted to go up it.  foolishly drove up that rd on a bank holiday in a people carrier full , with idiots parked up the verges and all sorts. barley room to get through, no hope of turning back, what a mare, thought I was going to kill us all. :lol: 
blencathra is fantastic (though it was saddlebeck when i done it)......in trainers, shorts and t-shirt. biked from keswick to threlkeld having set out for ullswater, saw people walking up and thought that looks canny, lets have a wander, walked all the way round from the left, reached sharp edge and said "f*** that" the lass i was with was game for it aswell, mental. got back to the bikes and fell asleep by the main road for an hour or two absolutely cattled.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 11:04:28 PM

Blencathra is a million times better than Skiddaw tbh.  And that road is a f***ing nightmare.. trying to get turned up at the top when it's busy :anguish:

ive been told that aye, climbed skiddaw a couple times just cos it was the view from my mams caravan, and all the time I looked at it I wanted to go up it.  foolishly drove up that rd on a bank holiday in a people carrier full , with idiots parked up the verges and all sorts. barley room to get through, no hope of turning back, what a mare, thought I was going to kill us all. :lol: 
blencathra is fantastic (though it was saddlebeck when i done it)......in trainers, shorts and t-shirt. biked from keswick to threlkeld having set out for ullswater, saw people walking up and thought that looks canny, lets have a wander, walked all the way round from the left, reached sharp edge and said "f*** that" the lass i was with was game for it aswell, mental. got back to the bikes and fell asleep by the main road for an hour or two absolutely cattled.

sounds mental. it looks lush early in the year driving towards it when it has a white top.  on the subject of gear, i get reet annoyed when I see people in trainers and jeans. tbh, how the f*** anybody can walk in jeans if its hot. or wet for that matter.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 11:07:26 PM
on the subject of gear, i get reet annoyed when I see people in trainers and jeans. tbh, how the f*** anybody can walk in jeans if its hot. or wet for that matter.

De rigeuer on Ben Nevis, you should have a look.  There are some comically uncomfortable lookin sights :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 11:13:38 PM

Blencathra is a million times better than Skiddaw tbh.  And that road is a f***ing nightmare.. trying to get turned up at the top when it's busy :anguish:

ive been told that aye, climbed skiddaw a couple times just cos it was the view from my mams caravan, and all the time I looked at it I wanted to go up it.  foolishly drove up that rd on a bank holiday in a people carrier full , with idiots parked up the verges and all sorts. barley room to get through, no hope of turning back, what a mare, thought I was going to kill us all. :lol: 
blencathra is fantastic (though it was saddlebeck when i done it)......in trainers, shorts and t-shirt. biked from keswick to threlkeld having set out for ullswater, saw people walking up and thought that looks canny, lets have a wander, walked all the way round from the left, reached sharp edge and said "f*** that" the lass i was with was game for it aswell, mental. got back to the bikes and fell asleep by the main road for an hour or two absolutely cattled.

sounds mental. it looks lush early in the year driving towards it when it has a white top.  on the subject of gear, i get reet annoyed when I see people in trainers and jeans. tbh, how the f*** anybody can walk in jeans if its hot. or wet for that matter.
depends where they are going and how long they are planning on being out for. personally, after snapping my ankle ligaments when younger i now wear my walking boots even for work and walking the dog.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Wednesday 15 August 2012, 11:18:36 PM

Blencathra is a million times better than Skiddaw tbh.  And that road is a f***ing nightmare.. trying to get turned up at the top when it's busy :anguish:

ive been told that aye, climbed skiddaw a couple times just cos it was the view from my mams caravan, and all the time I looked at it I wanted to go up it.  foolishly drove up that rd on a bank holiday in a people carrier full , with idiots parked up the verges and all sorts. barley room to get through, no hope of turning back, what a mare, thought I was going to kill us all. :lol: 
blencathra is fantastic (though it was saddlebeck when i done it)......in trainers, shorts and t-shirt. biked from keswick to threlkeld having set out for ullswater, saw people walking up and thought that looks canny, lets have a wander, walked all the way round from the left, reached sharp edge and said "f*** that" the lass i was with was game for it aswell, mental. got back to the bikes and fell asleep by the main road for an hour or two absolutely cattled.

sounds mental. it looks lush early in the year driving towards it when it has a white top.  on the subject of gear, i get reet annoyed when I see people in trainers and jeans. tbh, how the f*** anybody can walk in jeans if its hot. or wet for that matter.
depends where they are going and how long they are planning on being out for. personally, after snapping my ankle ligaments when younger i now wear my walking boots even for work and walking the dog.
and for those of you outside the area, those two words are pronounced the same, much as you would pronounce the latter.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Thursday 16 August 2012, 01:06:22 AM

BTW Madras, if you ever see these two on Simonside then do stop me and say hello :lol:

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7014/6580023761_5d4c9a94fd_b.jpg)

I go up there two or three times a week, I feel fairly sure I must have passed you at some point in the last few years :)
will do. haven't been up since easterish last year i think, in fact you've got me missing it now, might try and pop up the week the before the kids go back to school, more chance running into you in the shoulder of mutton though.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 16 August 2012, 07:49:18 AM
it looks lush early in the year driving towards it when it has a white top.

It really does :)

(http://i.imgur.com/67qXh.jpg)

And incidentally, you can see most of the route I posted above on this picture

Spoiler
(http://i.imgur.com/o144i.jpg)
First few arrows are really in the combe behind the lower slopes of Souther Fell, although it looks like I've drawn a path straight up the ridge.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 16 August 2012, 07:58:07 AM
great stuff open C , I accept the challenge for this year. where do you park?

edit- I can see your start on that map- im wondering if theres parking there?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 16 August 2012, 04:44:05 PM
You pass a pub called The White Horse at Scales (which is really just a house and that pub).  If you get there early enough, you can go up the slip to the pub and then almost through 180 degrees to go back to the bottom of Mousethwaite Combe which is where the path starts.  If you're later than about 9, the limited parking there will be full (takes about seven or eight cars max) and you'll have to park on one of the laybys on the A66.  None of them are too far away, though.

When you start out, the path up the combe is obvious, but it branches back on itself after a couple of hundred yards to go straight up to the western lip and climb that way.  Either way is doable, but I'd recommend you just stick with the main path up the side of the combe that you see in front of you.  They both go to the same place - the saddle between Scales Fell and Souther Fell.  Carry on along the Glenderamackin valley until you reach the waterfall issuing from Scales Tarn at the foot of Sharp Edge.  Just cross the waterfall and keep going - keep an eye out for the path here, and if you lose it just go straight uphill for ten yards or so and you'll probably find it again.  Anyway, you're making for the col between Foule Crag and Bannerdale Crags which is very obvious on the skyline.  When you get there, just turn left and follow the path to the top.  Gets a proper mountaineering flavour as you reach the final pull, with rock towers and crags all around you but you're still safe on grass.  Last 50 metres is up fairly stable and not too steep shale, and then you're there. 

The top is about quarter of a mile from where you reach the summit ridge up a very gentle slope, and once you've seen enough you can drop straight down the very obvious path down Scales Fell.  When that path goes onto grass, watch out for a 90 degree turn to your left that'll take you back down toward the Scales/Souther Fell col that you came up.

Good luck :thup:  And enjoy.  Steepest climbing is all right at the start in Mousethwaite Combe, after that you can just enjoy yourself.  Gradient picks up again as you approach Foule Crag but other than two false summits you can fairly well see where you're making for the whole way from the top of the combe, which makes things easier in the mind :)
 
I even saw a Brocken Spectre on that ridge up to Foule Crag one day, the only time I've ever seen it.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 16 August 2012, 04:46:11 PM
Looks pretty much like this, if you can imagine the blue line sticking sensibly to the ridges and paths rather than wandering off onto cliffs :lol:

BlenVideo (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jQSj6Nckpw#)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 16 August 2012, 04:56:17 PM
think im gonna make it my next mountan walk. if we get another dry weekend this school hols like :sad:  failing that still should be ok for sept. 5 mins from the hotel we were looking at anarl.  would have went this weekend but got 2x doo's and the match.
 
and thanks for the map shot, 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 16 August 2012, 08:24:53 PM
I have wild camped right on Ullswater shore in the lakes once last year and once this year. Both times the park ranger bloke came round in the morning about half 8 and tapped on our tent and said no overnight camping here and then went after we acknowledged him. No problem really. If you leave early in the morning then you'd easily have no problems wild camping. Its just too busy though the lakes; thats why I recomend the Galloway Forest Park, the other side of the Solway Firth instead; Far more remote and almost as beautiful.


surprised at that like. were you in the laybys heading towards glenriding? bben on them shores often and had bbqs, little beach fires, often fancied wild camping there. trouble is with kids/lass luxuries are a necessity really. Had a camper conversion for my people carrier and tried to camp in a layby near pooley bridge last year, but got bored  and ended up driving home at 9pm. :lol:

Yeah I was; last year was much better than this as the water level seemed to have risen which eliminated last years camping spot.

Stunning stuff btw Open C!  :yikes:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 16 August 2012, 10:55:02 PM
Cheers man :). Right place right time really, it's hard to take a bad picture up there if you're lucky enough to see it in the sunshine..
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 18 August 2012, 10:08:46 AM
Forgot to mention, by the way, that anybody using Android can currently get the Memory Map app for free which, with a modest investment in maps, turns your phone into a GPS (assuming you have GPS on it - it'll work with wifi triangulation but it's nowhere near as accurate out in the countryside).  Running it all the time and tracking routes whacks your battery, but it's very handy to have around (takes about two minutes to get a good fix).  There are alternatives (anquet is the most obvious one), but I've been using Memory Map for years so I've stuck with that.

I use the PC software as well so I spent £25 on two lots of 50,000 square KM at 1:50,000 scale, one for use on the phone and one on the PC.  It added up to this much..

(http://i.imgur.com/3rv0f.jpg)

..which is fairly well anywhere I'll ever want to go, Wales excepted.  If you only want mapping on the phone, you can buy a single block of 50,000sqKM for about £13 (that's still the amount on the map above - you just won't be able to use it on the PC as well).  You get a couple of basemaps for free (the major roads one, and the 1:250,000 scale route planner) which help you to move about and decide which areas you want to buy; you also get all the elevation data.  The 1:25,000 scale maps are quite a lot more expensive, but I prefer to carry paper versions of those and use the GPS to give me a broader picture of where I am.  For all but the most serious ridge walks and cliff faces, 1:50,000 is perfectly usable (of course, this is no substitute for carrying a map and compass with you, which have no issues with battery life or not being able to get satellite lock).

With the PC version (which also seems to be free - I downloaded the demo with my new account details and it seems to have all the functionality of the previous one), you can plan routes easily and see how long they're likely to take (and get a 3D flythrough out of it, like the Blencathra one above).  The Android version just carries the map and tells you where you are on it, and will track your walks if you leave it switched on the whole time.

It's not the easiest software to set up and use (or maybe that's just me moving to the new version having been used to its previous way of doing things), but the customer support is exceptional and for Ordnance Survey mapping on your phone the price is not bad at all.

Link is here (http://shop.memory-map.co.uk/acatalog/iPhone_iPad_Apps.html).  I should point out that Memory Map have a bit of previous for upgrading their software and forcing new map purchases to use the new version, but I stuck with the old mapping software for years (and through years of upgrades) without feeling the need to upgrade until this year because I prefer the new interface.

Video of the PC version working with the Mountain Track on Ben Nevis will be up here in ten minutes or so.  The 3D flythrough is usually silky smooth; I was up to an 8GB video file by then so my PC was starting to chug a bit :lol:  The 3D world is like google earth with folded OS maps instead of aerial photos (although admittedly not so easy to use as google earth).

Ben Nevis on Memory Map (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4-yT7lOayo#)

Ben Nevis isn't really this steep - I've got vertical exaggeration switched to about 1.5 to assist with identifying lower hills :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 18 August 2012, 10:13:03 AM

You may be able to just download the free app and the free basemaps and still have it give you an OS grid reference, which will be pretty useful in itself if you're carrying paper maps with you :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 20 August 2012, 08:23:33 PM
Heading up Scotland next week for 5 nights wild camping. Going to rack up just over 1000 miles; doing a bit of a tour, gonna see Loch Ness, John o' Groats etc then head over to Skye. Got wor lass and the bairn so gonna have to find spots quite close to roads but shouldnt be too much of a problem; I have already scouted out a few good spots on route on Google Earth.

Anyone know of any must see things up in the North or West of Scotland that I might not know about?

Cheers.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 August 2012, 08:34:05 PM
If the weather is good, Loch Torridon is pretty much a must see (much moreso than driving up to John o' Groats, imo, unless you just want to say you've been to the far North).  There are no pictures on the internet that do justice to the scale of the place.  Head toward Dingwall from Inverness, then A835 to Garve then A832 to Achnasheen and Kinlochewe and finally west on the A896 to Torridon.  There's literally nothing there except mountains and scenery, but in my humble opinion it's unsurpassed in Scotland (including on Skye).  Following the road through the village will take you on an interesting route past Liathach and Beinn Alligin to a tiny fishing village (Lower Diabaig) which is the most tranquil place I've ever been, with a photogenic shipwreck on the beach.  If the cloud is over the mountains at Dingwall though, I'm not sure I'd even bother - if you can't see the tops of the hills, it's almost not worth going.  An even better, although very slow, route up there is from Fort William up the A87 through Glen Shiel then up toward Lochcarron and past Applecross.

From Torridon, if you're a confident driver and your lass and the bairn don't mind a bit of excitement, the Bealach na Ba route across to Applecross is exhilarating; like climbing a mountain in your car.  It's easily the scariest road I've ever been on, though, so make sure you're up for it before you try it.

(http://www.lochcarron.org.uk/images/photos/Clarrie%20Pashley/Bealach%20na%20Ba%20road.JPG)

There's not a huge amount on the West coast other than scenery tbh; interesting attractions are few and far between.  I can vouch for the Applecross Inn and the Torridon Hotel (south bank of Loch Torridon just outside Annat) as good places to eat.

Sounds great.  I'm insanely jealous >_<
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 August 2012, 08:39:02 PM

Driving up Bealach na Ba (Pass Of The Cattle)(Applecross Road) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybzZP2FdiXs#)

Gets interesting from about 1:20.  In mist and low cloud it's terrifying tbh.  Be careful if you try it :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 20 August 2012, 09:01:43 PM
If the weather is good, Loch Torridon is pretty much a must see (much moreso than driving up to John o' Groats, imo, unless you just want to say you've been to the far North).  There are no pictures on the internet that do justice to the scale of the place.  Head toward Dingwall from Inverness, then A835 to Garve then A832 to Achnasheen and Kinlochewe and finally west on the A896 to Torridon.  There's literally nothing there except mountains and scenery, but in my humble opinion it's unsurpassed in Scotland (including on Skye).  Following the road through the village will take you on an interesting route past Liathach and Beinn Alligin to a tiny fishing village (Lower Diabaig) which is the most tranquil place I've ever been, with a photogenic shipwreck on the beach.  If the cloud is over the mountains at Dingwall though, I'm not sure I'd even bother - if you can't see the tops of the hills, it's almost not worth going.  An even better, although very slow, route up there is from Fort William up the A87 through Glen Shiel then up toward Lochcarron and past Applecross.

From Torridon, if you're a confident driver and your lass and the bairn don't mind a bit of excitement, the Bealach na Ba route across to Applecross is exhilarating; like climbing a mountain in your car.  It's easily the scariest road I've ever been on, though, so make sure you're up for it before you try it.

(http://www.lochcarron.org.uk/images/photos/Clarrie%20Pashley/Bealach%20na%20Ba%20road.JPG)

There's not a huge amount on the West coast other than scenery tbh; interesting attractions are few and far between.  I can vouch for the Applecross Inn and the Torridon Hotel (south bank of Loch Torridon just outside Annat) as good places to eat.

Sounds great.  I'm insanely jealous >_<

Cheers Open C, sounds good. I had heard that John o' Groats was a bit of a let down but wor lass is like "We've been to Lands End so we've got to go to John o ' Groats!" so still in two minds whether we go or not. One things for sure, itll save me a couple hundred miles driving if we dont visit it.

It looks like Torridon is on the way to Skye anyhow so ill check it out. Definitely going to head over that road to Applecross!, Love to scare wor lass witless and the bairn will love it (He's 11).
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 August 2012, 09:08:00 PM
Should also point out that Torridon village has a campside which is between wild and not (it has a toilet block and showers, and if memory serves it's free as well).

And aye, from Ullapool way (should also point out the beautiful beach at Little Gruinard Bay and unbelievably beautiful scenery on that coastline, complete with seals lying on every rock) going south, you'd go Torridon > Lochcarron > Kyle of Lochalsh to go over to Skye.  If you're in no hurry and have plenty of petrol, consider going from Ullapool to Torridon the long way along that coastline - if only for the view of An Teallach, one of the two most spectacular mountains in Scotland, by the road approaching Dundonnell.

(http://www.ourscotland.co.uk/potm/images/2011/Feb/An%20Teallach.JPG)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 20 August 2012, 09:22:02 PM
Cheers for the info! You are the Ray Mears of NO! Really hope the weather holds up to a decent degree for the trip!! Cant wait!!

Also, we are looking to spend a couple of nights wild camping on Skye, can you reccomend which part of the island would be best? Obviously want to be near the water with great scenery etc!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 August 2012, 09:26:37 PM
Heh :)  I really hope the weather holds for you; as I posted over the page somewhere, it's like being on another planet when the sun is out and the golden eagles, pine martens and whales are all around you :smitten:  Not to mention those mountains, which go from sea level to 1100 metres in very little horizontal distance and which will make you think, "I'm coming back for you f***ers another time".  Under cloud, it can be a miserable place :(

Haven't been to Skye for years, but you want to be looking around Glen Brittle for views of the Cuillin.  Can't remember any of the rest of the place tbh :(
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 August 2012, 09:34:33 PM

I knew this thread would fly eventually

(http://plus4chan.org/b/mspa/src/131870845897.jpg)

:lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 20 August 2012, 09:43:51 PM
 :lol:


theres at least 3 people read it.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 August 2012, 09:45:45 PM

11 pages, man.  And I'm responsible for only eight of them max.  You can't take that away from me

(http://plus4chan.org/b/mspa/src/131870845897.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 20 August 2012, 09:56:17 PM
good effort tbf.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 20 August 2012, 09:59:39 PM
Aye!  :lol:

Have spent hours trawling GM's for a good spot to camp on Skye but all the good coastal locations seem to be fenced off.  :sad:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 August 2012, 10:11:46 PM
Glen Sligachan maybe?  Or up to the Trotternish peninsula toward The Storr?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Monday 20 August 2012, 10:44:35 PM

I knew this thread would fly eventually

(http://plus4chan.org/b/mspa/src/131870845897.jpg)

:lol:

It's good reading and one day I hope to make an active participation. :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Wednesday 22 August 2012, 10:39:42 AM
well i set out for bowfell at 7am this morning and the cloud never lifted above the band. reached stool end farm and sheltered under some  trees through a shower or two but it never lifted. you could even see the rain coming down on lingmoor and there isn't enough shelter up there for my liking and i was planning on coming back that way should the cloud not lift further west. been here nearly a week and only been up silver how and loughrigg due to weather and time constraints. had a couple of nice lower level walks with the kids ,tarn hows and a couple of stretches of the cumbrian way. i'll be back!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 22 August 2012, 01:02:50 PM
I'm heading over to Great Gable tomorrow, I hope it cheers up..
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Wednesday 22 August 2012, 05:49:48 PM
Showery, some heavy in langdale. Harrison stickle in and out of cloud every hour and bowfell hasn't been seen at all. Went up to Keswick, one 10min shower and coledale was sunny and warm. In short, very changeable but dry somewhere, probably north west.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 22 August 2012, 08:14:04 PM
canny doc on bbc4 now  (Eiger)

 :scared:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 22 August 2012, 08:39:44 PM

The one about the North Face?  Aye, it's a good one :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 August 2012, 07:34:29 PM
Was pretty grim up there like :lol:

Went across Base Brown and Green Gable and bailed before Great Gable, just buggered off down Aaron Slack to Styhead Tarn.  Visibility was about 10 yards and it's not the easiest mountain to navigate under dense coud.  Came across any number of stupidly ill-prepared people heading for the absolutely invisible Scafell Pike, and a family with two young kids (looked between 6 and 10) at the rain-lashed and very cold summit of Green Gable :rolleyes:

I mean, the hills are for everybody.. but IMHO the high tops are no place for kids in anything other than good conditions (apologies if it was you Madras, no idea how many kids you have :lol:).  I like to think I know what I'm doing up there, and had GPS with me, and I was having doubts about my ability to find the start of the right path down.  Maybe both the parents were qualified mountain guides.. but even so, so much can go wrong up there - particularly where children are involved - and they were a long, long way from civilisation.

Would be interested to hear the views of those of you with children tbh.. our 10 year old is too lazy to go anywhere near a high fell so it's not a call I ever have to make, but would you take your kids to the top of a mountain (a mountain with significant and dangerous cliffs on it) in pissing, freezing rain when the visibility was like this:

(http://i.imgur.com/vQAcc.jpg)

This is at about 700 metres, visibility there is I reckon about 15 - 20 yards; obviously it just got worse the higher up you went, the top of Green Gable at 800 metres the visibility was about half this - was to the stage where you couldn't see the next cairn and had to rely on land which looked like it had been walked on) and I can't imagine what it looked like on Great Gable, which is pathless, almost all rock, and surrounded by precipitous drops.  I assume the family pushed on to Great Gable, they certainly didn't seem to be descending Aaron Slack after me.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 August 2012, 07:44:22 PM
Four walkers, one proper pack between them, stupid short shorts and hoodies all round, 400 metres up and thinking the summit was about half an hour away (probably two hours from there on a good day for a reasonably fit walker).

(http://i.imgur.com/J7h54.jpg)

Just no, man.  Mountain rescue should ask people what they're wearing before they agree to go out.  "Short shorts and hoodies?  No, find your own way down".

Again, apologies if this is anybody on here :lol:  But I suspect it isn't.  And maybe they've all got Alpine or Himalayan experience and this was just a quick jaunt out for them.  But I supect it wasn't.  Maybe (this is more likely) I'm just too much of an old-man-of-the-mountains and I should just chill the f*** out, but it's no wonder people get into trouble up there.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 23 August 2012, 08:08:31 PM
they are just asking for trouble if it turns nasty.  Last time I was up skiddaw I was in shorts and t shirt at bottom, at the top I was in fleece and waterproofs and was f***ing freezing- in a june I think.

About kids- my son wont go anywhere where he thinks he could fall off, and poor weather is a big no after we got caught in a cloud at angle tarn a couple of years ago, his waterproof got torn and he was soaked through.
I love walking in  the rain, but only go with the kids now- so must be clear day.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 August 2012, 08:13:45 PM

Aye, I really enjoyed it; as long as you're waterproof the rain isn't an issue (there wasn't much wind, so I didn't really mind it), and you get a proper sense of achievement from navigating yourself over something like this in poor visibility with no problems (Base Brown in particular was fairly well pathless and very, very wet - the kind of place it's easy to get deflected from your intended course by working your way around marshy pools).
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 August 2012, 08:19:12 PM
Oh, and a further thumbs up for that Memory Map software.  In conjunction with a fully charged Galaxy Ace with GPS switched on, it recorded my route today for around four hours and took about 40% of the battery, and although its pronouncements on altitude are a little bit out (generally reports around 100 metres higher than you actually are), pinpointing location on the map was absolutely spot on.  Any Android users (or iPhone, probably) with GPS who wants basic mapping GPS functionality will probably be pretty happy with it.

Android app is free for the minute and comes with a free basemap with very basic mountain details.. if you only want maps on your phone you can get as much 1:50,000 scale OS map coverage as the image at the top of the previous page for about £13.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 23 August 2012, 08:37:33 PM
I wouldnt even know where to start with that stuff- total technology idiot. Got my old os map out to have a look at your route and its got a big hole in it around helvelyn :lol:. best keep away from there.  Its 25years old and almost all the walkin I have done are within this map.mostly around patterdale, high street , ullswater tbh.  the map has been taped together for years, its like an old friend :blush: :lol:. but there is literally forests now where that map showed me clearings.   Maybe its time for a new one.
Kids love them 3d maps they sell in the lakes, gives them a much better idea of relief than contours, but the price of them is ridiculous like. ( not for walking tho)

Not looking too good this weekend forecast for rain  :(
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 August 2012, 08:52:10 PM
Aye, forecast is grim.  My investment in the four 1:25,000 lakes maps on that waterproof paper was one of my best :). Those four plus the Cheviots one have accompanied me on 98% of my walks these last five years or so. I look at them so often in the house that I know them like the back of my hand.. very rarely have to get them out of the bag except in conjunction with GPS in mist.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 23 August 2012, 09:00:56 PM
Aye, forecast is grim.  My investment in the four 1:25,000 lakes maps on that waterproof paper was one of my best :). Those four plus the Cheviots one have accompanied me on 98% of my walks these last five years or so. I look at them so often in the house that I know them like the back of my hand.. very rarely have to get them out of the bag except in conjunction with GPS in mist.

 :snod:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Friday 24 August 2012, 12:39:15 AM
Was pretty grim up there like :lol:

Went across Base Brown and Green Gable and bailed before Great Gable, just buggered off down Aaron Slack to Styhead Tarn.  Visibility was about 10 yards and it's not the easiest mountain to navigate under dense coud.  Came across any number of stupidly ill-prepared people heading for the absolutely invisible Scafell Pike, and a family with two young kids (looked between 6 and 10) at the rain-lashed and very cold summit of Green Gable :rolleyes:

I mean, the hills are for everybody.. but IMHO the high tops are no place for kids in anything other than good conditions (apologies if it was you Madras, no idea how many kids you have :lol:).  I like to think I know what I'm doing up there, and had GPS with me, and I was having doubts about my ability to find the start of the right path down.  Maybe both the parents were qualified mountain guides.. but even so, so much can go wrong up there - particularly where children are involved - and they were a long, long way from civilisation.

Would be interested to hear the views of those of you with children tbh.. our 10 year old is too lazy to go anywhere near a high fell so it's not a call I ever have to make, but would you take your kids to the top of a mountain (a mountain with significant and dangerous cliffs on it) in pissing, freezing rain when the visibility was like this:

(http://i.imgur.com/vQAcc.jpg)

This is at about 700 metres, visibility there is I reckon about 15 - 20 yards; obviously it just got worse the higher up you went, the top of Green Gable at 800 metres the visibility was about half this - was to the stage where you couldn't see the next cairn and had to rely on land which looked like it had been walked on) and I can't imagine what it looked like on Great Gable, which is pathless, almost all rock, and surrounded by precipitous drops.  I assume the family pushed on to Great Gable, they certainly didn't seem to be descending Aaron Slack after me.
wasn't me mate. struggling to get the girls very far and i'm not going to force them if they don't want to. loughriggs about as far as they'll go nd it's self defeating taking them out in crap weather as they'll not want to go again and like i said earlier, i saw bowfell in cloud and didn't bother and i never set out anywhere i don't know well without a map and compass (GPS aswell now)

edit, re those girls on the other pic, my wifes the opposite. went up loughrigg from skelwith bridge, took in the tarn and she was saying"if i'd known we were coming this far we should have brought more water and some food"..............it was about 3 hrs and that included loads of stops.

on the subject of clothing i wonder what you two think of fell runners who wear pretty much standard running gear up there ?



Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 24 August 2012, 08:40:32 AM

They're insane :lol:

Last winter, I found myself sat on Blencathra after a hard few hours' slog through knee high snow with a layer of ice underneath, crampons on, leaning on my ice axe, bundled up and warm.  Fell runner comes bounding along in a pair of shorts and a vest (to be fair, it was a nice day apart from the snow on the ground and a cold wind which you only noticed when you stopped) and what appeared to be a pair of normal trainers, carrying a water bottle and a little hip pack which was about big enough to hold his car keys.  I saw him again later on, just running down slopes that I wouldn't even climb down in good condition, little mini-avalanches all around him.

They only do it to make people like me feel inadequate :lol:  But very impressive all the same.  That said, if the he'd had an accident up there I'm almost certain he stood more chance of dying from exposure than he did of being rescued in time.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 8 September 2012, 09:37:48 AM
Anybody know how to get to Blencathra from keswick- without the car?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Saturday 8 September 2012, 09:42:26 AM
On foot?  :pow:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 8 September 2012, 10:06:10 AM

I guess your best bet is walk to the stone circle at Castlerigg then over the A66 (I think there's maybe an underpass around there somewhere?) and onto Blease fell is probably your quickest way.  Is a long way, though, and a dull way up the mountain.  If you're in Keswick without a car, one of the more adventurous ways up Skiddaw may be a better bet.

On a side note, I hope Pedro made it back safely :lol:  Doesn't seem to have posted since he was heading off for five days in Scotland about 20 days ago :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 8 September 2012, 10:39:15 AM

I guess your best bet is walk to the stone circle at Castlerigg then over the A66 (I think there's maybe an underpass around there somewhere?) and onto Blease fell is probably your quickest way.  Is a long way, though, and a dull way up the mountain.  If you're in Keswick without a car, one of the more adventurous ways up Skiddaw may be a better bet.

On a side note, I hope Pedro made it back safely :lol:  Doesn't seem to have posted since he was heading off for five days in Scotland about 20 days ago :lol:

 :lol:  maybe you should ring mountain rescue.
dont fancy walking from keswick tbh. and my lass dosent want to be left in keswick without the car. may go in a couple of weeks without her to do it, and settle for going with the bairn somewhere flat tmrw.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 22 September 2012, 04:04:40 PM
In the interests of pointing out that hillwalking and the like isn't always beauty and tranquility, I thought I'd post a couple of views of the path I've been following this morning :)

Signpost to Scald Hill and Cheviot, foolishly ignored on this occasion in favour of a made up route up to the col between Comb Fell and Hedgehope
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8322/8012175434_0b9a31eb28_b.jpg)

Slough of Despond #1 (which doesn't look too bad, but the path was like this for mile after mile.. boots sank in about an inch each step)
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8034/8012177420_ec86006ddf_b.jpg)

Slough of Despond #2 (particularly vile section before the final slope up to Hedgehope.. all like this, just too wide to comfortably jump and like a maze to find your way through without sinking)
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8306/8012176498_70de478175_b.jpg)

My feet were f***ing soaked after about 30 minutes (waterproof boots but couldn't stand up to this level of squelch), so I did the other four hours with wet feet :lol:  I got no particularly good pictures, saw nothing that I hadn't seen before.. but I still really enjoyed it :)  Hillwalking, man :smitten:

Did Pedro ever come back from Scotland..?  Had an awful feeling he'd plunged off the Applecross road following my recommendation :undecided:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 23 September 2012, 01:15:20 PM


Did Pedro ever come back from Scotland..?  Had an awful feeling he'd plunged off the Applecross road following my recommendation :undecided:

 :lol:  has he no logged in since.?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 23 September 2012, 04:14:27 PM
Not sure :lol:  I haven't noticed him posting anywhere >_<

Been over to White Coomb / Grey Mare's Tail near Moffat today.  Ashamed that I've been neglecting the Border hills for so long, the place is absolutely fantastic.  A perfect mixture of the roundedness and quietness of the Cheviots and the water and rock of the Lake District.

Grey Mare's Tail.  Haven't seen this for years and years, hadn't realised it was quite so big and spectacular.
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8322/8015744232_e8ff433cc3_b.jpg)

The top of the Tail Burn
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8447/8015742029_1b97fdff93_b.jpg)

Loch Skeen
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8315/8015745086_f86d3d4e1f_b.jpg)

Difficult to recommend over the Lakes because it takes about the same time to get there (probably considerably longer for those of you based further South), but it gives a very different walking experience and is worth a look if anyone fancies a change.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: womblemaster on Monday 24 September 2012, 04:23:21 PM
cant stand the lakes myself. too wet and too expensive.  Welsh mountains are much better imo.  cairngorms looks nice, but too many midges.....not been up west of scotland much.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 24 September 2012, 05:51:20 PM
:lol:  Wales is less wet than Cumbria..?  Not convinced :)

There is no walking area in the UK that compares to the west coast of Scotland (in my humble, but on this occasion correct, opinion).  The rest of them all have positives and negatives; Scotland is only positives, if you can live with the midges (or just don't go there when the midges are out).
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 24 September 2012, 05:59:57 PM
biggest positive with the lakes is under 2 hrs drive. and been twice this year - day return. 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: SEMTEX on Monday 24 September 2012, 06:01:18 PM
:lol:  Wales is less wet than Cumbria..?  Not convinced :)

There is no walking area in the UK that compares to the west coast of Scotland (in my humble, but on this occasion correct, opinion).  The rest of them all have positives and negatives; Scotland is only positives, if you can live with the midges (or just don't go there when the midges are out).

:lol: "Scotland is only positives, as long as you can live with the following negatives"
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 24 September 2012, 06:22:50 PM
Well, all depends on whether you see midges as a negative or not :)  They don't bother me in the grand scheme (or most walkers, since they tend to disappear as soon as you gain a bit of height), so it's hard to put them in the same category as, for example, constant rain or boring hills :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 24 September 2012, 06:29:28 PM
biggest positive with the lakes is under 2 hrs drive. and been twice this year - day return. 

Yeah, I never stay over in the lakes so the expense thing doesn't touch me at all.  I went over virtually every weekend last year; less so this year since I've been concentrating on Cheviots and Scotland.  Will start to go over to the lakes more regularly soon, as the snow puts Scotland into the "too scary" category for me.  Lake mountains are just nice under snow :)

The Welsh mountains are as far away as the Scottish ones but so massively, massively inferior in terms of hill quality and scenery (that's a genuine IMHO this time) that I never bother with it.  Would climb the mountains if I was there for other reasons, but don't think I'd drive down there just to do it.  Maybe I'm doing them a disservice, I haven't been for a long time.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 24 September 2012, 06:31:05 PM
biggest positive with the lakes is under 2 hrs drive. and been twice this year - day return. 

Yeah, I never stay over in the lakes so the expense thing doesn't touch me at all.  The Welsh mountains are as far away as the Scottish ones but so massively, massively inferior in terms of hill quality and scenery (that's a genuine IMHO this time) that I never bother with it.  Would climb the mountains if I was there for other reasons, but don't think I'd drive down there just to do it.  Maybe I'm doing them a disservice, I haven't been for a long time.


id like to try that 3 peaks challenge some day- think that would be the only reason Id venture to wales.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 24 September 2012, 09:56:38 PM
Don't think I'll ever do that.  Scafell Pike or Ben Nevis in the dark = asking for trouble.  Bloke died falling off Ben Nevis in the dark just a day or two ago. A few people these days do a more chilled out three peaks in three days; would consider that.

(http://www.jbutler.org.uk/images/Scafell/99293.jpg)

In the dark?  No thanks :scared:  bad enough in daylight tbh.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 30 September 2012, 08:26:23 PM
Revelatory experience for me in the lakes this weekend.  The 'tourist' route up Scafell Pike from Wasdale Head is really quite dramatic and cool :)  I went up Lord's Rake to Scafell instead, but really quite enjoyed the walk up Brown Tongue and Hollow Stones, which I've always assumed would be deathly dull.  Hollow Stones is an amazing place.

Scafell Pike and Scafell from the start of the Brown Tongue path
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8450/8040426523_825d4e007e_b.jpg)

Scafell Crag and the scree run at the bottom of Lord's Rake (behind the cliff at right foreground), from Hollow Stones.  It started raining properly after I got this :(
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8042/8040436348_e4ef87cf28_b.jpg)

Kirk Fell and Great Gable, back at Wasdale Head
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8182/8040435796_da0dc300a5_b.jpg)

Esk Pike and Bowfell, from Hard Knott in the foreground (which I climbed on the way back from Scafell, needing to rest my white knuckles after the terror of Hard Knott Pass)
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8316/8040435068_7473c3d3f5_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 1 October 2012, 08:19:03 PM
Don't think I'll ever do that.  Scafell Pike or Ben Nevis in the dark = asking for trouble.  Bloke died falling off Ben Nevis in the dark just a day or two ago. A few people these days do a more chilled out three peaks in three days; would consider that.

(http://www.jbutler.org.uk/images/Scafell/99293.jpg)

In the dark?  No thanks :scared:  bad enough in daylight tbh.


ah right- I thought it was done in a weekend?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 1 October 2012, 09:15:44 PM
Traditionally you need to be at the top of your final mountain (which would be Snowdon unless you were mad) within 24 hours of starting the first.  Usually means Ben Nevis late in the day, Scafell Pike at night then Snowdon next day.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 1 October 2012, 09:17:57 PM
Traditionally you need to be at the top of your final mountain (which would be Snowdon unless you were mad) within 24 hours of starting the first.  Usually means Ben Nevis late in the day, Scafell Pike at night then Snowdon next day.

ok. just decided its not happening. not by them rules anyway.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 1 October 2012, 09:31:26 PM
I don't really see the point of it tbh, and it means that all three mountains are f***ed all summer long with wheezing and tearful office workers on a charity mission who gravely underestimated the difficulty involved. Oh, and "team leaders" with noisy two way radios who are generally close enough to just talk normally to each other.  "*krrrzzzt* yeah Chris that's the front of the group at the half way lochan over *krrzzzt*" "*krzzzttt* yeah great Mike, I estimate the back of the group is approximately 15 seconds behind *krrrzzzt*"

Wish they'd all f*** off and do a sponsored bike ride or something :lol:

This isn't to detract from the achievement of anyone who has managed it, but the sight of 20 or 30 identical t-shirts sweating and bellowing their way up an otherwise peaceful mountain is fairly well my least favourite wilderness experience. I know they're not my mountains, but still :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 1 October 2012, 09:35:00 PM
is it really that bad :lol: kin hell. had no idea- I must go to really quiet places. Ive been to the lakes on a bank holiday before when theres been queues at stone piles for photos :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 1 October 2012, 09:40:25 PM
Ben Nevis is appalling in the summer by the usual route. Scafell Pike not so bad because some folk have dropped out already and most folk attempt it in the middle of the night.  Haven't been to Snowdon in years but imagine it'll be similar to Nevis, it being a potential first climb.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 5 October 2012, 08:44:38 PM
Have just realised that it's pretty much the same distance from my house to Great Langdale as it is from my house to the munros around Lochearnhead and Crianlarich.  Will put this to good use tomorrow, I think.

:megusta:

Advice on good routes in the area from Scotland-based climbers will be most gratefully received before around 4AM tomorrow, or I'll probably just head for either Ben Vorlich/Stuc a'Chroin or Ben More.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 12 October 2012, 07:03:51 PM
BAYMAN JUST SAID SNOW ON LAKE DISTRICT MOUNTAINS TOMORROW

:megusta:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 17 November 2012, 01:01:41 PM

The always-beautiful summit of Cheviot this morning :scared:

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8350/8193379850_4e82b1b5a4_b.jpg)

Always amazes me that the highest point in Northumberland (and, I think, the highest point in England outside Cumbria) is also one of the wettest :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 17 November 2012, 06:27:54 PM
haha. that summit is hideous, i will stick to admiring it from here. had my fun in the outdoors curtailed by home renovations this year. :(
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 24 November 2012, 08:38:59 PM
Stob Binnein today.  Up at 4AM to drive on frozen roads to Scotland.

Arrive in the carpark three and a half hours later to be confronted by a featureless, almost pathless and very steep wall of wet grass and mud.  And this is just the half of it you can see from the road >_<  You can see about 750 metres here, so not far short of the height of Cheviot.
(http://i.imgur.com/XJ9JF.jpg)

Had been knee deep in mud within two minutes of leaving the car park.  The gradient is very, very steep but the path is surprisingly easy going, actually.  Coming down it (wet and muddy, no obvious way to stop rolling following a fall) was terrifying, though.  The path follows a little burn which runs through a shallow, stony gully - after a while, the path and the gully become fairly well one and the same thing.

View from half way up that bit indicates the steepness (look how quickly the ground drops away to the tiny road at the bottom >_<)
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8347/8213518949_6f01137fea_b.jpg)

View from around 700 metres before the mist came down.  I didn't see anything else other than snow and other people's footprints after this one. 
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8481/8213390605_ffd4e4be6b_b.jpg)

No idea what the name of the mountain in the shot is.  My map runs out before it starts.  Scotland is full of mountains which would be Best Mountain In England if they were in the Lake District, but which go unnoticed north of the border because they don't measure up to the 3,000 footers (which is a shame, but which is never going to stop given how easy it is to find information on the munros and how relatively difficult it is to find routes and information on the smaller ones).

Turned around at the first summit on the ridge since it wasn't clearing; I don't see a lot of point in just ticking off summits for the sake of it, I'll save it for a better day.  So, twelve hours, £40 of petrol, filthy clothes and dogs and aching muscles to get about two thirds of the way up a hill.  It's the best hobby :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Wullie on Saturday 24 November 2012, 08:58:20 PM
Do you just go on your own OC, apart from the dogs obviously?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Saturday 24 November 2012, 09:23:29 PM
Great pictures.

How long did it take you, the walk by itself?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 24 November 2012, 09:57:30 PM

Aye, almost always just me and the dogs (more relaxing that way.. stop whenever, go wherever, don't have to worry about how other folk are getting on).

The walk today took about four hours, but it was more a ramble (had a bit of an explore on the way back down since I hadn't been to the top.. I normally just head down the quickest way I can).  Would normally plan to be walking for six or seven, but as I say the conditions weren't particularly great, and I didn't want to end up lost somewhere I'd never been before.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Saturday 24 November 2012, 10:51:20 PM
 :thup:

Hoping to do a bit more winter walking at some point.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 25 November 2012, 12:07:34 AM
I can't remember reading this thread before, I've got to say that I've missed a good one if I haven't.  It makes me want to regain some decent level of fitness after Christmas.  My main problem is that when I do go away I have to take my wife and she's s*** at walking and would probably moan her tits off if I took her away for the weekend and left her on her own for a day.

I get a bollocking for leaving her behind because it does my head in knowing that I could walk quicker backwards with my legs tied together.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Sunday 25 November 2012, 12:42:29 AM
crikey man, that pic of cheviot. imagine it without the path and having to edge along the wire on the fence.as one of the lads said at the time "if this was in black and white it could be the somme".
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 25 November 2012, 07:06:57 AM
The Somme is exactly how I described it to a couple of friends who followed me up that morning.  Just without any poison gas although it felt like that was probably on its way too.
Title: Re: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 25 November 2012, 07:11:24 AM
:thup:

Hoping to do a bit more winter walking at some point.

:thup: first use of crampons and ice axe this season. Felt great to get them back on, the state of the hill below the snow line was appalling and I think I'd almost rather have run the avalanche risk of the steep descent under snow than gone down it in the state out was in.

I can't remember reading this thread before, I've got to say that I've missed a good one if I haven't.  It makes me want to regain some decent level of fitness after Christmas.  My main problem is that when I do go away I have to take my wife and she's s*** at walking and would probably moan her tits off if I took her away for the weekend and left her on her own for a day.

I get a bollocking for leaving her behind because it does my head in knowing that I could walk quicker backwards with my legs tied together.

This is the reason I go myself, and the reason I'm happy to get up at  three in the morning to do it and get back while there's still some day left.  Feels less antisocial than routinely having nights away.  My girl likes to go for a walk, but not usually a hill walk.. picking the highest and rockiest/boggiest mountains to climb usually guarantees that she won't want to come along :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 30 November 2012, 03:35:16 PM

Just a couple from this morning's walk down the College Valley up to Cheviot and back.  More arty than representative of the walk, but they belong more in here than in the photo thread I guess :)  Cheviot is so much more pleasant when it's frozen solid; it was lovely up there this morning, but cold.

Auchope Cairn
(http://i.imgur.com/RmBhc.jpg)

Ice only on the English side of the border fence
(http://i.imgur.com/kiWoN.jpg)

The Pennine Way boardwalk across the peat bogs on Cheviot
(http://i.imgur.com/nfqki.jpg)

Christmas in the College Valley ???
(http://i.imgur.com/uY42y.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Friday 30 November 2012, 03:36:45 PM
Good pics!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Friday 30 November 2012, 03:36:54 PM
Stunning as always.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 11 December 2012, 03:03:43 PM
Fatal fall on Scafell yesterday- 50yr old male from west yorkshire.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 3 February 2013, 06:28:51 PM
Just a couple of pictures from yesterday's trip up to Scotland, my traditional "this is what it was like that day" shots, rather than the more artsy stuff I pollute the photo thread with :lol:

These are the Black Mount hills over Lochan na h-Achlaise.. Clach Leathad and Meall a'Bhuridh, which I'll climb one of these days but which are in a bit of a "neither here nor there" place which means I always want to drive further, having gone that far already.

(http://i.imgur.com/XgJ7Jl9.jpg)


Had been planning just a drive up the A82 to get some pictures of the highlands under snow but speculatively threw my climbing gear into the car in case I fancied a proper walk.  This is fairly well the last munro you pass as you leave the highlands - Ben Vorlich, which is one I climbed last Autumn and which I thought, "hell, why not" as I drove past Lochearnhead. 

I love it when my mountain looks like this from the road :smitten:
(http://i.imgur.com/bbgQBlu.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/SQojyMX.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/AzrAtcA.jpg)

Snow is frozen absolutely solid, so once I was above the snowline proper it was a delight to crampon through.  In the end, though, I got to about 700 metres and turned around before the final steep pull to the summit - a big and menacing cloud was getting closer, and a couple of minutes of blizzard would have left me lost and covered my tracks in no time at all, and I had those people who died in the Glencoe avalanche in mind.  Alas, the maps I took with me were for around Fort William and Glencoe so all I had was GPS mapping on the phone, which I don't really trust.  Moral of the story is, obviously, take the right f***ing map :rolleyes:

Finally, our very own little Cheviots on the way home :aww:

(http://i.imgur.com/eZTQRT7.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 3 February 2013, 07:31:07 PM
could see a White cheviot from here yesterday.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 3 February 2013, 07:50:29 PM

Aye, Friday night had a bit of a shower and brought it all back again, but it was already on its way by the time I was going home on the Saturday afternoon.  Love the Cheviots in the snow, but you have to be quick.. there's a very short window of opportunity between the approach roads becoming passable again and all the snow melting.  Go too early and you end up stuck at Alwinton or at the first hills up or down into Ingram or Harthope valleys, thinking, "I'll never get back out of here :anguish:"
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Thursday 14 February 2013, 04:44:41 PM
dog friendly pubs in the north east please, particularly country ones.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 14 February 2013, 06:30:38 PM

Can't think of one off the top of my head, although most of my walking is in the Cheviots which are not particularly blessed with pubs at the bottom of the routes.  The Rose and Thistle at Alwinton has a beer garden that (I think) allows dogs.. that's the best I can do, and I'm not even sure about that one :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 5 March 2013, 08:32:34 PM
Snow is disappearing people, get yourselves out again :)

Little walk up a very hazy College Valley and Hen Hole today, we're back into the time of year when you can take a sneaky half day from work and still get a walk in before darkness falls.

(http://i.imgur.com/eLKJfwr.jpg)

Easily the nicest of the valleys in the Cheviots, but it's a long way to get to it and you have to pay to drive any distance down it.  Of course, you'd spend that £10 on petrol getting over to the lakes/Scotland so it's money you would have spent for a good walk anyway.  I guess you could drive a bike to the end of the public road at Hethpool and ride the six or seven miles down the valley before starting your walk, but I'm too lazy for that sort of thing.  You'd have to ride it back as well when you came off the hill :scared:

(http://i.imgur.com/l6gyBuS.jpg)

Even mostly hidden by hazy fog, Cheviot always looks at its best from the North and the West, it's almost like a proper mountain (albeit a flat, Cairngormy style mountain) rather than the flat muddy lump that it appears to be (and actually is) from the South and East.

(http://i.imgur.com/pBkZAlU.jpg)

Hen Hole is almost the only place I know in the Cheviots where you need to put your hands down and do some scrambling.  Very picturesque and quiet, and unexpectedly rocky for the Cheviots.  While you're climbing through it, you could be in any of the more 'exciting' mountain ranges in the UK, but once you get half way up the rocks disappear and it turns back into more regular mud and tough grass :)  Hen Hole (or the bypass) lead up to Auchope Cairn and the boarded walkway across the summit plateau toward Cairn Hill and the actual top of Cheviot itself.

Lovely walk, really the only good short option for climbing Cheviot (Langleeford route over Scald Hill is grim and joyless and good for exercise or resiliance training only), and for anybody who doesn't fancy the rocks there's a much easier option to the top just to the West of Hen Hole, following the border fence up to Auchope Cairn.  Recommended for anybody who wants a quiet and easy (unless you go through Hen Hole) walk without leaving the North East.  I should point out, though, that the snow is unavoidable at the minute, and some patches are about two or three feet deep.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Friday 22 March 2013, 12:34:52 PM
hey open c, been out with the dog a bit and been looking up to the cheviots from the west end, seems like theres a wind farm gone up to the east (as i look) of hedgehope but probably a good bit south aswell, any ideas ?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 22 March 2013, 11:35:09 PM
There are four or five windmills at Wingates now, which is just to the east of Simonside.. could that be it? Can't say I've noticed any new ones around the Cheviots themselves.

Was up in Scotland on Wednesday when I was on strike.  Fearsomely cold, snowy and windy.. a bit unnerved up there, which hasn't happened for a while.  Felt a distinct possibility of getting hopelessly lost, and beat a hasty retreat.  Total time driving: around eight hours, total time walking: around one and a half :anguish:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 28 March 2013, 03:34:15 PM
Cheviots today.  Very cold, very windy, snowdrifts taller than me (I'm six foot two).  Unbelievably tiring but beautiful despite lack of sunlight.. tempered, though, by the trailers full of dead sheep and calves at the bottom, and the ones still lying on the hillside :(

Leaving the road at Trows, Windy Gyle (today's hill, again) is the high rounded skyline on the left
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8375/8598260940_f686983e97_b.jpg)

Cheviot
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8525/8598261272_b03a1846aa_b.jpg)

The Schil and surrounding
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8391/8597158087_a8909c1758_b.jpg)

Hurts your eyes, walking in the snow for so long >_<
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Inochi on Thursday 28 March 2013, 03:35:33 PM
Snow is disappearing people, get yourselves out again :)

:lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 28 March 2013, 03:35:58 PM
Aye, was going to quote that myself :lol:  To be fair, you had a good fortnight of no-snow to go at :shifty:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 28 March 2013, 03:36:14 PM
Any ideas what keilders like? or rather likely to be by sunday?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 28 March 2013, 03:37:51 PM
Probably a lot like that.  Snow depth is impossible to judge because it just blankets all the holes, so you can go from firm ground to falling three four feet into a little burn gully in a step or two.  It's challenging stuff :lol:  After a while, you can't even judge where the snow level is because it's all so very white, so you find yourself kicking into drifts you hadn't spotted, or putting your foot down like missing the last stair. 

I would say the biggest drifts on Windy Gyle (which is higher than Kielder, admittedly) are about ten feet.  Even just around 300 metres up, though, two and three foot drifts were not uncommon.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 28 March 2013, 03:39:00 PM
might give it a miss
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 28 March 2013, 04:03:13 PM

Depends what you were going to do, I guess.. if you were going for a wander through the forest, you'd probably be alright.  The approaches are probably OK, and the car parks are probably fine.  If you were going anywhere steep/open/exposed, it might be a bit more of an expedition than you expect.  But I don't know Kielder at all, so I might be overdramatising things.  Windy Gyle is fairly well as far away from anything else as you can get in Northumberland (well, Scotland technically), I don't think Kielder is quite so remote.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 28 March 2013, 04:13:53 PM

Depends what you were going to do, I guess.. if you were going for a wander through the forest, you'd probably be alright.  The approaches are probably OK, and the car parks are probably fine.  If you were going anywhere steep/open/exposed, it might be a bit more of an expedition than you expect.  But I don't know Kielder at all, so I might be overdramatising things.  Windy Gyle is fairly well as far away from anything else as you can get in Northumberland (well, Scotland technically), I don't think Kielder is quite so remote.

was sort of joking , in two minds, desperate to get walking boots on after such a long winter. Like hills and stuff, but dont like excluding my lass and bairn 21months, so we decided over 3-or 4 visits to do a lap of keilder water with the little one walking/ being pushed. Can get a lot of kit(food+stove) under a pram, decent cross country thing. its the path at keilder that appeals to us- I know theres a similar one near Cat bells- might check that out as well. gonna cycle round kielder at some point- as well.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 28 March 2013, 04:17:32 PM

My lass and the bairn are like :yao: "get yourself away, we'll stay here" :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 28 March 2013, 04:22:50 PM
 :lol:  you need to educate them, start by hiding your pictures.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 28 March 2013, 04:26:13 PM

:lol:  They'd just be an almighty pain in the arse anyway, they can stay at home :)  We're all going up to Torridon in a couple of months time, might see if they fancy a look up one of the mountains around there

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eOJl5Mdvdvw/UAQ4T3w2GXI/AAAAAAAABYY/xP5Ys52KurM/s1600/IMG_4990.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 28 March 2013, 04:32:18 PM
 :scared:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 1 April 2013, 05:06:01 PM
Decided on keilder, lakeside walk, it was f***ing freezing with the wind off the lake. aborted after about a mile. headed into the forset and did some trail that was sheltered by trees.  Plenty snow still around up there.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 1 April 2013, 06:15:36 PM

Aye, I'm just back from Cheviot and it's much as it was on Friday tbh (albeit sunnier and warmer today)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 1 April 2013, 06:35:01 PM

By way of example

Couple of views of the final slope of Cheviot
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8248/8610921362_248059c990_b.jpg)

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8242/8610918310_b5c4b2966f_b.jpg)

The fence that runs up that final slope.  It's a standard sized fence, maybe four feet, and is still almost entirely buried in places
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8118/8610917226_2a66151e00_b.jpg)

As a side note, Cheviot itself is much more pleasant in the snow, with none of the deep bogs and marshy bits that usually spoil a day's walking :aww:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 1 April 2013, 07:13:21 PM
nice pics- cheviot was in view much of our way over today, gleaming pure white- my lasses face when I pointed and said - its near there. :lol:

anyways it was nice and sunny but ferkin freezing.

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 1 April 2013, 09:47:08 PM

Aye, it was that.  The hills are beautiful when they're covered with snow, though :aww:  Shame they're also more dangerous, really :(

Just a couple more

Hedgehope, from Scald Hill
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8531/8611596390_5e3dc2920e_b.jpg)

Happiness is..
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8241/8610488961_ce588e326d_b.jpg)

And happiness is also..
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8532/8611594794_0a314736b2_b.jpg)

Love having an excuse to use the winter stuff without having to drive 300 miles to do it :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Parky on Monday 1 April 2013, 10:13:04 PM
Had a nice 4hr walk in the snow in the Lower Saxony forest today. Bracing.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 2 April 2013, 02:49:44 PM
Had a nice 4hr walk in the snow in the Lower Saxony forest today. Bracing.

wheres that?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 April 2013, 06:36:52 PM

I know I've said this before, but it would appear to be Spring in the Cheviots now :aww:  That said, was still snowing lightly on the tops of Hedgehope and Comb Fell today but not a chance of it lying.

All pictures from around Linhope Spout way, top of Breamish/Ingram Valley.

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8263/8685674411_f772669d76_b.jpg)

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8535/8685675283_0757499c45_b.jpg)

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8123/8686792916_cd78b8fd44_b.jpg)

Get yourselves out :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 April 2013, 06:54:05 PM
Additionally, hills are generally a long, long way from SJP (other than the hill on West Road), from televisions and from decent radio reception.  All good reasons to get out there :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 27 April 2013, 07:44:06 PM
looks very dry. :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 April 2013, 07:49:17 PM

Still a bit swampy underfoot in places, but it was lovely up there today.  I feel almost tanned :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 27 April 2013, 08:10:09 PM

Still a bit swampy underfoot in places, but it was lovely up there today.  I feel almost tanned :lol:


surely that cold wind was there?

bank holiday next weekend- gonna run to the hills.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 April 2013, 08:12:28 PM

No, it was alright tbh, even when it was snowing.  Didn't need a coat, didn't need a hat :)

Is it bank holiday next week?  Get in \o/
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 8 June 2013, 06:47:40 PM
Two massive Munros (admittedly closely linked ones) today for the around the price of one ascent of Scafell Pike, about 980 metres of climbing.

Beinn Ghlas (1,103m)
(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5469/8987788215_94d9d15de7_o.jpg)

Ben Lawers (1,214m)
(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5350/8988987410_dd34099cdb_o.jpg)

View behind from on the way up.  Page-breakingly wide, maybe, so spoilered.
Spoiler
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7294/8987786337_2cc224e475_o.jpg)



Near Aberfeldy / Killin, not too far into the highlands.  These are as close to me as some of the more southerly Lakes mountains.. I don't think I'll ever go to the Lakes again tbh :lol:  A car park at around 450 metres and a bealach/col/pass between the two at around 1000 metres are what make it so easy :)  Pretty much foolproof in whatever weather as long as there's no snow lying and you can see the path, which is fairly well fantastic all the way over the two.  A couple of very easy rocky bits make them feel like proper mountains, although a five year old would get up them easily :)  There are multiple paths, though, so a map (or an idea of how the paths work, at least) will be a prerequisite.  Well worth a look for anybody passing through that part of the world :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 4 August 2013, 08:53:40 AM
Resurrection due to a bit of an adventure on Ben Nevis yesterday.

The weather was appalling above about 600 metres, black clouds which were obviously full of rain and the wind was clearly strong from the speed of the clouds, so I decided just to go the tourist path since I've driven all the way up there.  It being August, and it being a Saturday, there were hundreds of people there, and they were all heading up.. 80% of them dressed as if they were heading down Fort William high street to get a cup of coffee.

I have never known rain like the rain I experienced on the way up.  Was actually physically painful to bare skin.  Anyway, it took me about three hours to get up there and around 100 metres below the summit I came across a couple of guys in trainers and jogging gear who were on their way back down.  The big dude (with a waterproof coat) was moving OK but had a worried look on his face, the little dude (with just a casual jacket) was shuffling along with his teeth clamped together in obvious distress.  The big guy thinks his friend is hypothermic and wants to know if mountain rescue will come out for him, but doesn't know how to be in touch with them.  He thinks they're going to try to walk down a little further before he makes the call (his friend is almost incapable of any movement at all; he is exhaused, soaked to the skin and freezing cold, and a worrying whitish-blue colour).  There were still loads of people up there, but most of them were as wet as him and just hurrying past to try and get down.

So, I told the guy that if he's calling mountain rescue then now is the time to do it.  While the dude is on the phone to mountain rescue, the little guy starts to shake uncontrollably.. not shivering or trembling, but proper exaggerated shaking.  Like Parkinson's Disease shaking.  His teeth are chattering so much that he's biting his own lips and drawing a bit of blood, he can't move his hands to hold things, he is in a proper f***ing state.  By this time I'm looking through my bag for food, dry stuff and my survival bag that I was hoping never to have to use; he collapsed onto the rocks while I was putting him into the bag, and that's when other people started to notice that something was amiss.. another dude who was coming off the top had another survival bag and a dry top, two girls from Manchester way had some other stuff so between the four of us, we propped him up on a rock, tried to get him out of the wind and started working out how long it was going to take mountain rescue to get up there.  Of course, we were all soaked through and f***ing cold as well at this point, but slightly more waterproof than he was.  After about 20 minutes, three or four people who were looking after and who were going to push on to the top decided to stay with him until mountain rescue arrived.  I've been up loads of times and wasn't that bothered, so I and a couple of others came down, minus our survival bags and dry clothes, looking out for mountain rescue to tell them where the guy was.  As we came down, the wind and rain actually got worse.  I can't imagine what a state the guy near the top would have been in.

On my way back down, just above the line where the rain turned really cold, I came across a guy dressed as a chicken.  I told him in no uncertain terms that he was doing the wrong thing and that a guy was up there shivering in a shiny plastic bag waiting for mountain rescue because he hadn't prepared for things.  He told me to f*** off and mind my own business.  Everybody I saw going up in casual gear, I told the same.  Like a proper Old Man Of The Mountains :lol:  None of them turned around, they were all going to be fine.  I'm sure they all were.

Three weeks ago, I was up there and I saw somebody getting airlifted off the top with heatstroke.  Unbelievable.  I'm guessing I would have seen it on the news by now if the dude had died.. but I couldn't sleep last night for thinking about the poor f***er sat shivering under the top, I hope he's OK :(  He shouldn't have been up there dressed like he was, but what a pitiful state to get into :( 

August :yao: 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Sunday 8 September 2013, 11:51:39 PM
been up open c's way on today. Edlingham, wander round the castle then up to Caller crag, Like any good Sunday walk, back to a pub for sunday dinner (shoulder of mutton in open c's backyard)

Whats the castle facaded building up past lemmington wood (lemmington branch) ?

edit, how do the locals pronounce it, I've always use the 'gh' as in bellinjam and ovinjam ?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 10 September 2013, 08:34:24 PM
my son has just sent me pics from the top of this he has climbed while in Spain with his Mam.

Quite proud.




(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cd/Montserrat_des_de_Manresa.JPG)


Montgros 1120m
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 September 2013, 07:31:21 AM

Presumably climbed from the back where it must be easier than that, unless he went up on a rope belaying his mam the whole way :lol:  This is the one who said Liathach and An Teallach looked too scary??

Madras: you're probably looking at Lemmington Hall, which sits just under the moors road across to Alnwick from the Rothbury crossroad.  And I also pronounce Eglingham with the J sound, but no idea if it's right or not :lol:

I'm up to 25 munros now :)  Just 258 to go :anguish:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pi_D on Wednesday 11 September 2013, 10:51:14 AM
Nice thread.

Have many done the Camino de Santiago?

Ive been 3 times, twice walking sections of it and once cycling the whole thing. The last time we walked from Biarritz to Santander along the coast through the absolutely beautiful Basque country. Amazing scenery, especially coming into Guernica.

Feckin love northern Spain like :D
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 11 September 2013, 10:56:49 AM

Presumably climbed from the back where it must be easier than that, unless he went up on a rope belaying his mam the whole way :lol:  This is the one who said Liathach and An Teallach looked too scary??

Madras: you're probably looking at Lemmington Hall, which sits just under the moors road across to Alnwick from the Rothbury crossroad.  And I also pronounce Eglingham with the J sound, but no idea if it's right or not :lol:

I'm up to 25 munros now :)  Just 258 to go :anguish:


aye thats him- badly worded my post he climbed it with her brother/his uncle while in Spain with her- The thought of my ex climbing with ropes :lol:

Just got us a three man Rib, thinking of birthing it at Ullswater next season.

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/v/998308_651089248249301_310337489_n.jpg?oh=9031e8c71bccc2f25a42f9ef37692f5e&oe=52321D74&__gda__=1379072817_a51031404b9f4130bfe2a9b860dcf185)



(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/v/1175717_651089268249299_371564196_n.jpg?oh=5037a5e8a5421fd90a9b8a0a076951eb&oe=52320A04&__gda__=1379108904_b9bd605c13d9ec5f2a758d2510d184a4)
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/v/1176167_651089294915963_472334620_n.jpg?oh=183b848d5acd35210b3bca03b19eb8ce&oe=5231E737&__gda__=1379065627_3a99f87d5a08704c1dd0429f96b741d4)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 September 2013, 05:27:54 PM
Nice thread.

Have many done the Camino de Santiago?

Ive been 3 times, twice walking sections of it and once cycling the whole thing. The last time we walked from Biarritz to Santander along the coast through the absolutely beautiful Basque country. Amazing scenery, especially coming into Guernica.

Feckin love northern Spain like :D

Had never heard of it, but Google Images makes it look lovely :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: FrenchWilliam on Friday 13 September 2013, 02:02:43 PM
OpenC- possibly a stupid question but, can you recommend a hill around the Cairngorms that's doable pushing a pram?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 13 September 2013, 05:42:26 PM

Ooof

Most of the hills will be physically doable, the Cairngorms are generally gentle and rolling and there are some good paths up there.  Even so, certainly none of the Munros are appropriate for tiny kids since they're 4,000 feet high, punishingly cold/wet/windy at a moment's notice and a long, long way from help.. but I'll have a think about it :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Friday 13 September 2013, 06:07:53 PM
french William, maybe look at easy Mountain bike routes- or even look for a site that recomends wheel chair accessible routes? :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 14 September 2013, 10:56:54 AM
Couldn't really find anything, cp40's suggestion is probably best.  There are probably any number of wonderful walks but I always head for the high mountains so they're the only places I know.. and there's too much of the safetyman in me to recommend taking kids up there.  I've seen the weather change hideously too many times, even in the summer and even at fairly low levels.  You could have a walk up to Loch Muick as recommended here (http://babyroutes.co.uk/walking-routes/cairngorms-national-park-scotland/), maybe, but it'll be through the hills rather than up them.  Even a walk around the development at the bottom of the mountain railway might be a worthwhile experience, and that's certainly safest.

Have fun wherever you go, though.. the Cairngorms were a revelation for me in August.  I'd previously written them off as big lumpy wastes of time, just like the Cheviots but a bit higher.. I was very wrong, the monumental scale of the place is amazing (although to be fair I'm not sure if you'll get to a position to take that in with a pram).  I can't wait to go back there.  Would move up to that part of the world in a heartbeat if circumstances allowed.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 3 November 2013, 10:42:27 AM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/q71/995869_534149876678535_1273108527_n.jpg)

Nearly time for spikes on the boots :celb: :celb: :celb:

Not a fan of skiing, personally, but that's where all the webcams are :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 3 November 2013, 11:07:01 AM
Northerngimpski needs to see that.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 3 November 2013, 11:08:12 AM
I don't suppose it's quite ready for skiing yet, but with the wind the way it is they should be able to gather a fair old bit of drift from the fences and get some pistes sorted before too much longer :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 3 November 2013, 06:26:02 PM
Friday night in Aviemore booked on the strength of that picture :lol: :cheesy: :frantic: :celb:

Friday nights in Aviemore in November, by myself.  Life is good :yao:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Sunday 2 March 2014, 10:48:33 AM
I think I'm more likely to reach an appropriate audience in here. I'm wanting to get into some proper walking/hiking since I absolutely love walking but just doing the streets near where I live gets a little boring after a while.

Couple of questions:

- I'm going to need some walking boots. I've not had any since I did Duke of Edinburgh as a teenager so not really up to date on what's required. Any dos/don'ts I should take into account? I'll not be looking to spend a fortune as I'm just a beginner but don't want something that's going to fall apart straight away so not looking to go too cheap either.

- Any recommendations for decent places to walk that I can get to by train/bus since I don't have a car? Not talking gigantic mountains or owt just yet (I have to convince wor lad it's a great idea first) but just somewhere with some nice scenery to take in. Or any websites which have suggested routes would be appreciated too.

Probably wait until the weather's a bit nicer before starting properly, just want to start compiling the gear so it's not a massive expense all in one go.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 2 March 2014, 04:25:55 PM
Not sure about public transportable walks around your neck of the woods, although I'm sure they exist (I remember the cliffs around Marsden and down toward Sunderland being quite a decent hike in good weather, though).  Or there's sure to be a bus from Haymarket to Rothbury (although it's probably a two hour journey), from where you can climb Simonside, my local dog walking hill.  Or if you're feeling properly adventurous, train to Carlisle then bus to Keswick from where you could climb Skiddaw if you so desired (or Latrigg as a little option, or hike out to Castlerigg). 

Boots: just get whatever is comfortable, really.  I use fairly light fabric Mammut ones in Spring/Summer/Autumn; need to change them soon but they've done three years of three season walking, and never let me down, even through fairly deep flowing water.  They cost around £100, but you don't need to spend that much.  You're probably looking between £50 and £100 for decent ones which will last you, though.  A lot of people prefer leather ones, but I find them squeaky and intensely irritating :lol:

Layers are where it's at for the rest of your gear (imho).  Don't worry about big expensive coats and stuff; when I'm not going on the big mountains I make do with t-shirt, fleece and a light windproof outer with a waterproof coat in the bag just in case.  Usually does for summer and winter alike, even in the Cheviots.  Same for legs; £8 waterproof overtrousers are, I think, a better option than expensive and hot stormproof trousers that you might not need to make use of.  Don't wear denim or any cotton if you can help it :)

Good luck :)  Simonside from Rothbury is a great little* walk on the right sort of day, and can end with a pub :)

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8382/8545776376_b8be1d3154_o.jpg)

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8090/8544681283_266542803b_o.jpg)

* 15km, not actually so very little.  I usually climb it from the car park half way up it, so my perception of it is not quite the right one
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Monday 3 March 2014, 12:06:38 PM
Thanks. :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: madras on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 01:48:32 PM
train to haltwhistle, AD122  bus to walltown then walk the wall back to steel rigg, about 8mile, very up and down but great views back to whence you came. impossible to get lost, great views along the whin sill, history, and then finishing off at the twice brewed inn and hadrians wall visitor centre where the bus will take you back to hexham or haltwhistle to get the train back.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 02:10:02 PM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/q71/995869_534149876678535_1273108527_n.jpg)

Nearly time for spikes on the boots :celb: :celb: :celb:

Not a fan of skiing, personally, but that's where all the webcams are :)

Lush!!!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: TBG on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 02:18:02 PM
Are all pop up tents round shaped? I'm useless at putting them up so want another pop up one for when I go to a music festival only problem is I need it to fit in a small bag or suit case.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 04:00:55 PM
looking forward to heading over to the lakes for some walking soonish hopefuly. Daughter boyfriend and son want to do high street with me- ive failed in last 3 attempts to get to it  :lol:  you'd think it was summiting everest, its under 3000ft- twice turned round in the rain, and last time tried from pooley bridge but proved too far for son, aborted around 3pm after 9 am start- for fear of it getting dark on return.

also want to do blencathra on what I now call the Open C route.

first sunny weekend Im off.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 06:41:15 PM

Which is my Blencathra route?  From Scales and around Sharp Edge, up by the Bowscale Fell / Blencathra col..?  Aye, it's a great route :)  Saves the view to the very, very end.  Make sure you stick to the main path up through Mousethwaite Combe, don't zigzag back up the minor path onto Scales fell.  And then straight across at the waterfall coming down from Scales Tarn.  You'll almost certainly lose the path there a couple of times, but just keep heading for the low point on the skyline.  Can't go wrong :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 06:47:43 PM

Which is my Blencathra route?  From Scales and around Sharp Edge, up by the Bowscale Fell / Blencathra col..?  Aye, it's a great route :)  Saves the view to the very, very end.  Make sure you stick to the main path up through Mousethwaite Combe, don't zigzag back up the minor path onto Scales fell.  And then straight across at the waterfall coming down from Scales Tarn.  You'll almost certainly lose the path there a couple of times, but just keep heading for the low point on the skyline.  Can't go wrong :)


thats the least steep route?  theres a map on here somewhere, will be checking it out- maybe time to invest in some new OS this year.
 :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 06:53:28 PM

Steep through Mousethwaite Combe at the start (with a couple of rock steps which feel very adventurous) and steep at the very, very end.  Nice almost flat section down the valley between Scales Fell and White Horse Bent in the middle of the walk to recover breath.  It's still hard work, don't get me wrong, but I think it's the best combination of scenery and safety/relative ease on the mountain.  The paths up Doddick Fell and Halls Fell are probably more spectacular but steeper and more exposed as well.. and the usual route up Blease Fell from Threlkeld is a non-starter for me, just an endless grass wall.

Go down via Scales Fell for a rounder circuit with different views going back :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Slim on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 06:55:55 PM
Is there any good tent bargins before festival season starts
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 06:56:44 PM

(http://i.imgur.com/NhRAf4w.jpg)

Just the 1:50k version but you'll get the idea :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 07:02:03 PM
Aye, nice one, cheers





Sharp Edge,


 :yao:

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 4 March 2014, 07:20:56 PM

Best thing about this route is that it goes all the way around Sharp Edge so every time you stop for breath you can watch people clambering over it :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 10 March 2014, 04:48:26 PM
Since the thread made it back onto page 1, some shots from a planned trip up Ben Macdui and Cairn Gorm in Scotland today, second and sixth highest mountains in the UK.  Didn't make it, since conditions on the notoriously deadly Cairngorm Plateau were dangerously changeable, and I was by myself.  Was going to go across the tops of the Northern corries and just climb Cairn Gorm, but I didn't trust my navigational skills enough - it wasn't windy or particularly cold, but it was one of those days where you couldn't see a great deal of difference between ground and sky, and too many people run into trouble on that plateau because they overestimate their ability.  As you can see, there's not much to go on navigationally in deep snow, and when the cloud comes down you can end up in real bother if you don't know exactly where you're going.

Not scenic enough for the photo thread :)  All taken with old manual focus lenses from the 80s (which isn't easy when you don't have a viewfinder), so forgive me if they're not as sharp as usual :)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7374/13063281095_57a0aee25d_o.jpg)

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2506/13063602054_ca8449393a_o.jpg)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7324/13063273815_be8ccf1232_o.jpg)

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2731/13063704984_b4600eaa17_o.jpg)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7338/13063290035_1b1df16788_o.jpg)

Most of the pistes on Cairn Gorm look to be in good condition, for those of you who prefer the sliding approach :)  Snow is deep and just hard enough to support weight properly while still giving a couple of centimetres.  No comedy sinking into drifts, no comedy clattering down frozen solid pistes.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Monday 10 March 2014, 08:55:12 PM
Doing the West Highland Way end of June. Looking forward to it, need to see more of my own country.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Wednesday 26 March 2014, 01:29:12 PM
Trying to organise a bit of a camping trip for me and the lads in the summer.

Anybody got any recommendations?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: TBG on Wednesday 26 March 2014, 01:50:11 PM
The Amazon Rainforest.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 26 March 2014, 09:09:42 PM

Clay went somewhere a couple of years back (documented in this very thread, as I recall) that looked alright.  I can't recommend anywhere other than bleak Scottish mountains, which I suspect isn't precisely what you're looking for :lol: 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Clay on Wednesday 26 March 2014, 09:20:51 PM

Clay went somewhere a couple of years back (documented in this very thread, as I recall) that looked alright.  I can't recommend anywhere other than bleak Scottish mountains, which I suspect isn't precisely what you're looking for :lol: 

Not sure I could recommend that place for a group of lads really, there was literally nothing to do :lol: Suppose if you'd be content with getting p*ssed and building fires for a night or two it'd be alright but there's got to be loads of places better for that.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Thursday 27 March 2014, 02:23:28 PM
That's all that we want to do tbh. :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Thursday 27 March 2014, 02:35:50 PM
Park foot in the lakes Tooj. on site club/bar.   3? pubs/ beer gardens within walking diastance at Pooley bridge, more pubs and maybe a club at penrith a taxi ride away. 

Been kicked off site a few times for these camping trips in the past. :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 20 April 2014, 07:22:25 PM

Been to Glenshee today.  The ski-munros there have a hideous reputation and they are a bit of a mess (climbed Cairnwell and Carn Aosda anyway).  Carn a Gheoidh further West is a lovely walk, though, and the high ski car park makes it fairly easy.  All in all, three munros for not that much climbing and five hours walking isn't a bad return and takes me to around 50 munros now I think :)  Just the 220 to go :anguish: Beautiful day as well, properly tanned already.

No fine art for the photo thread, so I'll stick them in here :)

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2939/13929290431_6a80fb6bd1_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ndTfKR)P4207253 Cairnwell Slopes (https://flic.kr/p/ndTfKR) by open_cs (https://www.flickr.com/people/43224398@N00/), on Flickr

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2928/13929299462_d05d2ef729_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ndTiry)P4207244 Cairngorms (https://flic.kr/p/ndTiry) by open_cs (https://www.flickr.com/people/43224398@N00/), on Flickr

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7181/13929302622_d27db0ab35_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ndTjo3)258 - 260 Cairnwell, Carn nan Sac (https://flic.kr/p/ndTjo3) by open_cs (https://www.flickr.com/people/43224398@N00/), on Flickr

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7147/13952850024_e070cc6bc6_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nfY1cJ)P4207263 West from Carn a Gheoidh (https://flic.kr/p/nfY1cJ) by open_cs (https://www.flickr.com/people/43224398@N00/), on Flickr

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3825/13952458193_d88f3dac89_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nfVZJ2)P4207281 Cairngorms (https://flic.kr/p/nfVZJ2) by open_cs (https://www.flickr.com/people/43224398@N00/), on Flickr

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3759/13929289252_e7039981fc_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ndTfpw)P4207287 Carn a Gheoidh (https://flic.kr/p/ndTfpw) by open_cs (https://www.flickr.com/people/43224398@N00/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 4 July 2014, 07:49:53 PM

Blencathra sold to some random.  My first proper mountain.  I don't suppose it matters as long as they don't cover it with wind farms or zip lines :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: POOT on Friday 4 July 2014, 08:20:15 PM
flickr's awful for loading images, for me :( Worth the wait...but messes with the page load.

Anywho...had my first pit roast the other weekend. Built it in part of my garden (so technically still outdoors :lol:).

Meat was ok but the corn on the cob and the sweet potatoes where awesome. Particularly the sweet potatoes.

Was more about the experience as my friend goes out and does it for real. Great fun and a great night.

Looking forward to doing it in the highlands or somewhere.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: adam on Friday 4 July 2014, 08:31:25 PM
Absolute camping kna-nowt here;

Is chopwell woods sound for wild camping or am i going to be skullfucked to death by some bush lurker?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: POOT on Friday 4 July 2014, 08:38:10 PM
Go to Wark Forest or something a little bit further out (if it's local you're after). Chopwell is more like a day stroll kind of place. Can't imagine camping there.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Monday 1 September 2014, 01:06:24 PM
:lol: I appear to have agreed to hike up Skiddaw with people from work.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 1 September 2014, 05:58:57 PM
Skiddaw is lovely :aww:  And you park a third of the way up it already (if you're going the usual route), so although it's fourth highest in the country you only climb about 500 or 600 metres and other than the first hour which is, admittedly, steep and tiring (but entirely safe), it's really quite an easy walk for so high a mountain.  You'll probably find yourself wanting to go across the subsidiary summits on the way back down :)  Make sure you can be waterproof and warm (don't forget gloves and hat, even when it's still summer).  Was f***ing freezing at 1060m (not that much higher than Skiddaw) in Scotland today, although the sun was shining.

Enjoy :)  I hope you get a good day for it, the view south to the rest of the Lakes mountains is inspirational.


I've re-evaluated my Munro progress and with the two I've added today I have climbed a majestic 37 of them :)  Of 282 :anguish:

(http://i.imgur.com/stiv1R1.png)

So much still to do :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Monday 1 September 2014, 07:50:03 PM
I'm really looking forward to it actually. Some of the others I'm going with are fairly experienced so I should be in pretty good hands. Just need to grab some waterproof trousers and other than that I think I'm set. It's not until 27 September though so I've got time.

Current plan is to go this route: http://www.lakedistrictwalks.com/skidul.html
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 1 September 2014, 08:08:43 PM

Oh, that's the good way :)  Much longer and more demanding* but much, much more rewarding.  I really hope you get the weather for it :thup:

* although if you're into your fitness, you'll probably not even feel it like otherwise-lazy-f***er hillwalkers like me do - most properly fit people I've gone up mountains with report a pleasant feeling of having exercised and got the heart rate up, but don't do so much of the out of breath, sweating like a bull and gently steaming in the cold bit that most of us do :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Monday 1 September 2014, 08:26:54 PM
:lol: I'm definitely in the best shape I've ever been in so hopefully I'll be up to it.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Sunday 28 September 2014, 12:23:43 PM
Skiddaw was absolutely brilliant. :D

We set off just after 10am and covered around 8.5 miles in about 5 hours (including breaks for lunch and the rest of the party to catch up). I was a bit nervous as on meeting some of the others in the group it turned out most of them had hiked and climbed mountains all across the world. :lol: I was in the "lead" pack from the start and right through to the end though so think I held my own. I kept having to explain that I'm a naturally quick walker so wasn't deliberately trying to rush off, I'm just not built for ambling along slowly.

There were a few steep sections during the ascent that got the heart racing but it was manageable, it was more the fear of losing my footing on the scree that was a concern. Just followed the footsteps of whoever was in front though so it was ok.

The clouds round the top cleared briefly just as we approached the summit so we got a bit of the view. Naturally once we made it down and came out of the pub after a lovely meal, it was a beautiful day. :lol: Would've had much better weather if we'd set off at about 12 instead, but it wasn't too bad on the whole - just had a hooded top on and stuck my waterproof on towards the top for an extra layer, but was sweating on the way back down before I had a chance to take it off.

Will definitely be joining them on the next trip.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ByjqAdCIcAA_yYW.jpg) (https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ByjqAt6IIAAFa8B.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 28 September 2014, 01:30:57 PM
:thup:

Give it two years and you'll be rolling out of bed at 3.30am to drive 300 miles and climb some godforsaken Scottish mountain with a name you can barely read, let alone pronounce :)

Good that you enjoyed it despite the summit mist.. that's the problem with the bigger mountains (and Skiddaw is some size, one of only four in England that would be a Munro), they do tend to attract the clag.  Part of the experience, though :)

I was up Braeriach yesterday, third highest in the UK at 1,296m.  Amazing walk (although I also was fogged out toward the top), but very long and with some properly abominable terrain to cross - a famous little cleft in the Cairngorms called the Chalamain Gap turned out to be an absolute nightmare of jumbled boulders, most of which were not quite big enough not to move when you step on them.  Horrific :)  Also difficult mentally, because half of the walk is just getting to the bottom of Braeriach and there are some significant, and very steep, downs which you know will be significant, and very steep, ups when heading home in three hours' time and already exhausted.  Still, a good early start, and being spurred on by a bitterly cold and very strong wind, got me up and down in just over seven hours which isn't bad going given the distance covered and the amount of ascent involved.  That's 39 done now :)

I put the good pictures in the photo thread, but for the sake of posterity

(http://i.imgur.com/W2lZsL8.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/G2wIUQf.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/972aD1T.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/GBVlGta.jpg)

And a couple more, one of the entrance to the Chalamain Gap on return, and one from almost the bottom of the final soul sapping outward-bound-descent before starting on Braeriach properly

(http://i.imgur.com/YHbVgFu.png)

(http://i.imgur.com/9qftFKy.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Monday 29 September 2014, 01:11:58 PM
The next suggestion:

Blencathra via Sharp Edge

:yao:

(http://www.dorkatorium.co.uk/pictures/cliff.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 29 September 2014, 01:31:26 PM
It's not as bad as it looks (you might have seen it as you drove toward Skiddaw), although you will need a head for heights and the ability to keep moving with fairly substantial exposure on either side of you.  There's a point at which you're only going across these things to make the walk artificially more exciting, though; the step up from the Lakes to the Scottish mountains has taught me that there's always a harder way you could be going, and has also taught me that a lot of the time the easier route is a better choice :)

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_sKketh7ik0/TZTuxaoBqpI/AAAAAAAAARQ/hMspNH4SP4U/s1600/34%2B-%2BSharp%2BEdge.JPG)

Personally, these days I would generally take the easier option every time (largely because I've usually got three dogs to look after as well) but Sharp Edge is a classic route.  Narrow Edge is a better way up, although for some reason much less known.

If you're sticking with the Lakes, and you get to have any say in the matter, my recommendation for next would be Great Gable from Seathwaite via Green Gable first, which will introduce you to the concept of hands-on-rock scrambling (not quite climbing but not quite not - you'll need it for Sharp Edge) at Sour Milk Ghyll near the start, then will give you a sense of exposure behind you (as you go between Green Gable and Great Gable) which will allow you to see whether or not you're likely to freeze on Sharp Edge.  If you don't like the feel of the exposure on Great Gable, there's an easy escape down between Great and Green Gables to Styhead Tarn.  These are both things you need to be able to do to get up Blencathra that way, and on Gable you can practice them individually - half way over Sharp Edge is no place to lose your nerve and find out that you don't like one or both of them :)

Additionally, Gable is much the finer mountain (imho, although Wainwright wouldn't agree) and is secluded enough to feel remote in a way that Blencathra and Skiddaw don't, with the A66 going along their bases.  Amazing view of the Scafells from the top as well.  There are very few seasoned walkers who would say no to a day out that involved the Gables tbh, definitely worth putting to them :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 29 September 2014, 01:51:47 PM

..and with that, I'm off to do a four or five hour circuit of the two highest Cheviots with me dogs, which will involve precisely no scrambling and no razor-thin aretes above 200 foot drops :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Monday 29 September 2014, 01:53:14 PM
Interesting stuff, thanks for the suggestion. We did get a nice view of Blencathra as we drove along to Threlkeld for pub food afterwards. I just googled the route earlier though and was mildly terrified of some of the pictures. :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Monday 29 September 2014, 01:58:01 PM
OpenC, have you thought about writing a book about your routes? Photography as well, would be brilliant.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 29 September 2014, 02:01:19 PM
Aye, Blencathra is one of my favourites in England.  My preferred route goes past then around Sharp Edge, and up the ridge behind it.

Without wishing to be all Old Man Of The Mountains, the reason that people get into trouble on routes like Sharp Edge and Striding Edge on Helvellyn is that they overestimate their capacity to deal with the exposure and generally find out too late that they really don't like it, after they've already committed to a couple of moves which they aren't sure about (usually encouraged in a good natured way by friends who have been up there a million times), and end up cragfast and unable to go backwards or forwards.  It doesn't happen to the vast majority of people, and you'll already have a reasonable idea of how you'll respond, I'm sure, but there's nothing like Sharp Edge on Skiddaw, it's a genuine step up in difficulty and exposure.  It's a good way to put yourself off for life :lol:

OpenC, have you thought about writing a book about your routes? Photography as well, would be brilliant.

Heh, thank you :)  I've thought about it loads of times, aye, but it's a crowded marketplace and most of the authors are much better writers (and generally photographers) than me.  The Cheviots have long needed a proper guidebook to the higher mountains in the National Park, though, and I've been steadily collecting pictures and routes for years now.  Maybe some day :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Monday 29 September 2014, 02:06:11 PM
I don't know the market at all TBF.

Just the reason most people don't go (I imagine) is that they don't know what's out there and they don't know the routes. Anyway, you know much better than me, I'd just like to know where to go!

I just got a Wild Running book that has some good routes for running off road, going to be trying those out. Mainly the ones in the south first, but there are some in Northumberland and Cumbria as well.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 29 September 2014, 02:14:22 PM
Aye, that's probably the biggest part of it.  Where do I park, which path do I follow, how long will it take, do I need to spend £2k on new gear before I set out.. and all the while you see Mountain Rescue teams on the news berating people because they went unprepared, and haven't been doing orienteering since they were 14 :)  People who aren't naturally fit also get turned off when Just Walking turns out to be much more tiring and difficult than anticipated (which it is - any summer day on Ben Nevis or Scafell Pike will present an amazing number of people managing about 10% of the mountain before giving up, red-faced and blowing through their arses).  The way Jill did it is the way most of us do it - go with a person or group that have been out before and (appear to) know what they're doing :)

There's a load of information out there on the internet, of course, but in Scotland the vast majority tends to be about the Munros (the mountains higher than 3,000ft or 914m in real money) so ironically the biggest and (generally) most dangerous ones are the ones which attract the walkers because it's so difficult to get quality information on routes on the smaller and more benign ones :)  Same in England - the Wainwrights are popular in the Lakes, but it's not so easy to find good quality information on getting around in the Cheviots or Pennines.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Monday 29 September 2014, 02:14:39 PM
The next suggestion:

Blencathra via Sharp Edge

:yao:

(http://www.dorkatorium.co.uk/pictures/cliff.jpg)

Blencathra is great but I cant face sharp edge, just like OpenC says...I know my limits and I dont like being exposed.  My arse goes.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 29 September 2014, 02:17:34 PM
Blencathra is great but I cant face sharp edge, just like OpenC says...I know my limits and I dont like being exposed.  My arse goes.

And you end up in the same place whichever way you climb it :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Monday 29 September 2014, 02:18:52 PM
Blencathra is great but I cant face sharp edge, just like OpenC says...I know my limits and I dont like being exposed.  My arse goes.

And you end up in the same place whichever way you climb it :thup:

Yep and we've watched a few idiots go up shapr edge in chinos and flip flops with their dogs off the leads.  Idiots, they ended up coming back down.  We watched them from the otherside.

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: High Five o/ on Tuesday 30 September 2014, 07:31:36 AM
Interesting read Open C. I might have to come over and join you on a trip one day  :)

I am looking on a new backpack these days. Need it for both weekend camping trips, longer trips etc. I have many small day packs, but nothing for longer trips.

I have decided on the brand and model as i have tried them, but the size is so hard to choose.
65L will fit all the stuff i need, tent, sleeping bag, food, sleeping mat, cooking equipment, camera gear etc. But i am a little unsure about winter trips.
So i am considering 75L instead. I know its very individual and depends on the gear size, but should i go up on size to be sure?
Or would that just lead to me bringing more stuff i might not need, and carry a heavy load?

Any views on this?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 30 September 2014, 06:51:35 PM

Aye, get yourself over and I'll show you the delights of Scotland :)

I use only 35l almost all the time since I very rarely do multi-day trips involving tents, sleeping gear and cooking.  There are very few mountains in Scotland that you can't do in a single day (although there are three or four Munros involving 30 - 40 mile walks that I'll have to get round to some day).  If I was carrying that stuff as well, I'd be going for 75 personally - I tend to carry a separate 35l bag with all my camping stuff in when I need it.  Most of the time, I only carry a hat, gloves, fleece, a very light windproof jacket, a very light waterproof jacket and some very light waterproof overtrousers.  Other than that, it's basically food and map.  Sometimes I carry spare shoes for river crossings, sometimes gaiters if it's dismally boggy or grassy terrain after rain.  As we've discussed plenty of times in that other thread, I don't use big camera equipment any more so that's not a concern for me; RX100 fits on my belt :)

Winter trips aren't necessarily too different depending on how active you're going to be - I don't carry big heavy coats any more because I don't spend a long time not moving, so I keep warm enough.  Ice axe and crampons (if you're walking in the sort of places that need them) tend to strap outside rather than go inside, but if you're carrying crampons inside your pack they take up quite a lot of space.  Ski goggles are a must in winter (imho) which take up a bit of extra room unless you just wear them on your head.

In my experience, you'll always fill whatever capacity you have and aye, a lot of the time it's with rubbish that you really don't need :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 3 October 2014, 02:52:16 PM
Open C, I see you were in the Cairngorms on Sunday 28/09/2014, I was up there up myself having backpacked over from Fort William over to Dalwhinnie, you weren't by any chance in the Cairngorm hotel watching the stoke game were you?

High five O. I've been backpacking for a few years now. I did use a blacks 65ltr dating from the 90,s but took the plunge this year and bought a Lightwave 60ltr pack which can carry enough for a 5/6 day hike. The only down side I find with the lightwave is there is no outside pockets or mesh however the weight is the best thing about it- just over a pound. Osprey have a good reputation for packs. Its really down to personal choice. If you want to carry more winter gear, most winter gear is now lightweight and packs down
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 3 October 2014, 05:50:23 PM
I wasn't; I was only there for one night (Aviemore) on the Friday, walked on the Saturday, headed back after the walk.  The Cairngorm Hotel (if it's the one I'm thinking of: opposite the station?) has always looked a bit too posh for me to go there tbh, I tend to head through the underpass to the Old Bridge :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 3 October 2014, 08:07:46 PM
Yeah your,e right the Cairngorm hotel is opposite the station. Have a look in next time your,e up, its a fine bar with a load of TV screens.(its the door on the left as you look at it) I had one in the Old Bridge as I was staying the bunkhouse next door getting dried out. don't know if you've stayed in the Bunkhouse, I, ve been using it for 10 years now and its getting a bit worn   
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 3 October 2014, 08:10:52 PM
Nah, I'm a SYHA man myself :)  Aviemore Youth Hostel is a proper home away from home for me.  I'm starting to run out of Northern Cairngorm munros but it's still a pretty useful base for the ones which are too far North to do as day trips for me (Strathfarrar and the likes, I've even used it as a base for Torridon despite the two hour drive out and subsequent six hour drive home).

I will have a look, though :thup:  Will probably head up once more before December and then knock it off until February/March time.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 3 October 2014, 08:24:41 PM
Never tire of the cairngorms. Quite often get up there in a motorhome and kip regularly in the sugar bowl car park on the ski road. Was up there in may and left the van at Achlean in Feshie and did a two day backpack over Monadh mor and Bhein Brotain, kipped at Geldie Lodge ruin and then walked back to the van through Glen Feshie. Fantastic area.

Have,nt done the Strathfarrar hills yet, they will be on next years list. 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 3 October 2014, 09:13:45 PM
I haven't been across to Monadh Mor or Bhrotain yet; wasn't sure whether Feshie or Linn of Dee was the best start.  last month I added Sgor Gaoith and Mullach Clach a Bhlair from Achlean, and also Braeriach, Schiehallion, Meall Chuaich, Glas Maol and Creag Leachach. 

Sgor an Lochain Uaine and Cairn Toul looked close enough to touch from the approach to Mullach Clach a Bhlair but it looks like difficult terrain and a nightmare in mist..

Up to 39 and a long long way to go, but it's 38 more than I ever thought I'd do :) I love the Cairngorms as well, my favourite walking area despite lack of pointy peaks.

Got five nights in Onich soon so will knock off a few in Glencoe and the Aonachs (via gondola) :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 3 October 2014, 09:45:30 PM
Feshie or Linn of Dee would be a toss up, both long distances but I think I would favour Feshie for the approach, the approach up glen Geuschan (spelling?) from Linn of Dee can be lengthy and boggy.

Cairn Toul and Sgor an Lochain Uaine are a fair stretch from feshie and its the travel back unless you camp.

Have you been up Lochnagar yet?, can recommend going from Glen callater, its about a 15 mile day which could be made easier with a bike for the glen journey

Best of luck with the munro bagging, I,m up to 203 (not trying to top trump!)and I,ve been on for 36 years. I,ve a few lengthy ones to do like Fisherfield and Mullardoch  and despite doing  the Skye ridge I,ve not done the Inn pinn ( and might never do! )

Enjoy Onich , Glencoe, they were the hills of my youth, and the Nevis hills
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 3 October 2014, 09:56:40 PM
Was planning on Lochnagar as part of four or five around Loch Muick but I've had ideas like that before and run out of energy way before halfway :)

My next year targets are the four in the far North, Ben Wyvis, the Fannaichs and the ones south of Glen Torridon.  I never get tired of the many hours of driving involved.

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 4 October 2014, 10:58:04 AM
Havent been further north than Ben More Assynt and Conival, this months plan was the Cape wrath Trail which I started from Glenfinnan and got to the Claunie hotel via Kinbreak bothy and Loch Quoich and was then forced off by gale force winds and monsoon downpours hence the backpack from Fort William as plan B.

Ben Wyvis is a strange one more like a range than a single hill if you make it a circuit.

Done the fannaichs apart from the eastern two. Sgurr Mor and Sgurr nan clach geala are fine hills especially in the winter with a covering of snow. Had a bit of an epic two years ago on Sgurr nan clach geala thanks to a snapped crampon stramp which led to the crampon coming off when coming down its north east ridge which is quite an angle and exposed when snow covered, amazing to see it without snow its just an average slope with no danger.

I,m not bothered about the driving but I,ve taking to getting the train of late especially when backpacking. I,ve found if you book far enough ahead and split the journey up it can be cheap, got to Fort William from Newcastle last month for £24.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 4 October 2014, 07:47:45 PM

Good to have a bit of Munro experience on here :)  Are you actively going after them all, or have you just got to 200+ by default due to getting out for walks?  I'm in two minds whether or not to pursue them all due to (a) necessarily missing out on some wonderful smaller hills and (b) the probably massive number of them that will require a significant investment of time and money and will turn out to be just big and dull lumps like Ben Challum or Ben Chonzie :anguish:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Saturday 4 October 2014, 11:54:13 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQ_IQS3VKjA

Incredible.  :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 5 October 2014, 09:45:10 AM
Never really made a conscious decision to go after the Munros until about 3 years ago. I generally go April, May and late September to avoid the midges and as I like to fit in backpacking as well, its quite arduous to fit both in unless I combine the two. Spent years in my youth and 20,s going on yearly family holidays going to Skye or Glencoe so that has probably limited the numbers.

Know what you mean about the financial and time commitment and that any plans in place may be wrecked by  the weather which means sometimes it might be another year before you get back to the same place.

I still do some of the smaller hills like the Cobbler, Streap, Stac Pollaidh or Quinag.

See how you go with the numbers game, a week or two week holiday can really boost the numbers when you consider things like the South glen shiel ridge has 7 and the mamores 11, Ben Lawers 5 and a round of say Ben Starav area has another 5.

Try some of the hills that seem like boring lumps, in the winter, I did Chonzie in April 2012 when it was in full winter condition, all my kit on crampons and ice axe. It was a memorable day. The munros either side of the A9 at Drumochter were the same. I was on these in march this year. To look at them in summer they are just grassy, boggy, midgey ridden hills but under a cover of snow and the temperature at -2/3 its a different world.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 5 October 2014, 01:09:19 PM
Aye, I've been making a conscious effort go get shot of some which aren't naturally attached to any others so I can start knocking them off in threes and fours later.  Also been trying to get some of the legendarily dull ones out of the way first (Drumochter was the first area I 'finished', and although I didn't have a lot of love for any of the East ones, I really enjoyed Geal-Charn on the West side).  Also now finished off most of the ones which require a walk past ski paraphernalia to get at, other than Creise.  Theoretically, the way I'm doing it they'll get (on average) better and better although Beinn Alligin will take some beating.

Keeping Chonzie for when the snows arrive, aye :)  Can't decide whether the Turret or Lednock start looks better; will probably go with Invergeldie if only because it's shorter :)

TBH, until 2011 my Munro count was 1 (and you can guess which one that was).  Knocking off almost 40 in three or four years seems like not bad going from Northumberland tbh, and I wasn't even really thinking about it as a possibility until probably Spring this year so I made a lot of trips to the same mountains (climbed Ben Lawers four or five times now); as long as I keep it in that sort of perspective, it seems doable.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 5 October 2014, 02:48:30 PM
Yeah its doable. I would say that 40 in a relatively short space of time is commendable when you consider there are so many other factors, distance, costs , time available, injuries, weather and other distractions. I think the secret is to keep on enjoying. I wrenched my knee quite badly last march on Glaramara in wet snow and couldnt go for about 6 months so I,m happy to be still doing it     

What I,ve found that at the minute I,m now chasing some hills that I missed out in past days when I wasn't chasing the numbers, like Stuc A Chroin or Ben Vane  or the east end of the Lawers range. They all take the best part of one day for one hill, so your plan of getting awkward ones out of the way is not a bad idea.

I take it your number one up till 2011 was the Ben Nevis? My first hills was Ben lawers and Beinn ghlas from the old visitor centre way back in 1976. Seems like a long time ago Jimmy carter and supermac

Chonzie I did from turret, kipping at the dam in my van.

I know what you mean about doing hills many times. I must have been up some of the Glencoe hills, particularly the Buichaille a dozen times.  However they can all be different, by routes, conditions, other people   
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 6 October 2014, 09:43:19 AM
Well if all had gone to plan I would have done Cape wrath yesterday and would have walking back from sandwood bay today out to Kinlochbervie. I had planned to walk back instead of the traditional route of bus/ferry to durness as the bus ends last day of September. Looking outside now and checking the weather forecast of gales and rain on the Scottish west coast I,m pleased I made the decision about 40 miles at Claunie to abandon.

Roll onto the first week of May 2015 when I will be setting foot from Glenfinnan again hoping to complete in two weeks   
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 26 October 2014, 02:19:07 PM

Didn't get very far the last few days (most of these were taken from inside, or within five yards of, my car) but even in epic, biblical rain I would rather be there than here

(http://i.imgur.com/fRUlZAt.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/zY9jrDs.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/GyYYF9n.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/zkqWkuF.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/I548G9j.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 26 October 2014, 07:52:01 PM

Since this is the premier thread for outdoors enthusiasts (all five of us), you get the super bonus pictures as well, denied to those only looking at the photo thread :lol:

(http://i.imgur.com/NsOMz8C.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/UwaJj8Y.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/g352q3T.jpg)
(no idea what was going on with the white balance here; my colour blindness is well documented so please accept my apologies if this one is miles off)

40 munros now anyway :)  50 will feel like a genuine milestone, I think, and I'm starting to think that I might manage the lot (excepting the Inaccessible Pinnacle, maybe).  I was worried for a while about not getting documentary evidence of all of them due to inclement weather on summits but tbh who gives a f*** about that :lol:  I'd only be fooling myself if I was making it up, I guess.

For the benefit of snoopdawg, added Mullach nan Coirean in Glen Nevis this trip, and now have irritatingly climbed that and Sgur a'Mhaim but bailed from both before continuing to Stob Ban which will now require an ascent all of its own.

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Monday 27 October 2014, 02:43:11 PM
Awesome pics!

Wor lass mentioned going to Canada next year for skiing instead of the Alps.

Will see how it turns out.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Monday 27 October 2014, 03:17:55 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b04kntlk/danny-macaskill-riding-the-ridge

If anyone hasn't seen it, follows himself and the production team while they make it. The guy is incredible.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 27 October 2014, 06:14:29 PM
had no time to get on any hills, apart from a wander up Barton Fell, this summer. Due to work and ongoing ankle problems.
So Im considering doing some winter walks. Lakes, or Northumberland.
 Any tips from experienced lads? (open C :lol:)  not wanting to go all Alpine and take ropes or crampons. thinking about some moderate but longish stuff so low risk but still a worthwhile walk.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 27 October 2014, 06:20:41 PM

The problem with the Cheviots in winter is getting close to them; the access roads are all quite high and all have disconcertingly and intimidatingly steep sections when it's icy.  Hethpool in the North is probably the safest access point when it starts to get cold, and a walk down the College Valley is never disappointing.  There are a few options in the Lakes.. back of Skiddaw route, or East bank of Ullswater maybe?  If there's no ice on the ground, then all of the Cheviots are fair game (and are much more enjoyable when the ground is frozen rather than boggy).  If there's snow, though, don't underestimate them :)  Windy Gyle in the snow is one of the hardest (but best) walks I've ever done.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 27 October 2014, 06:25:48 PM

The problem with the Cheviots in winter is getting close to them; the access roads are all quite high and all have disconcertingly and intimidatingly steep sections when it's icy.  Hethpool in the North is probably the safest access point when it starts to get cold, and a walk down the College Valley is never disappointing.  There are a few options in the Lakes.. back of Skiddaw route, or East bank of Ullswater maybe?  If there's no ice on the ground, then all of the Cheviots are fair game (and are much more enjoyable when the ground is frozen rather than boggy).  If there's snow, though, don't underestimate them :)  Windy Gyle in the snow is one of the hardest (but best) walks I've ever done.


sounds good- but aye- im looking for easy access otherwise I have to buy snow tyres for the BM and that just adds to cost- feel they are unnecessary around towns.

Yeah Ullswater east side, thats partly Barton Fell, - Good walk onto high street, very doable in winter- But I mentioned that to my son, and his face was a picture :lol:  as we once aborted that in the summer.

Might even talk Gimp into a lap of Kielder water.

edit- keeping away from snow- thinking more of the milder winter weather- so need a good site  that monitors fell snow/ice.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 27 October 2014, 06:34:44 PM

www.mwis.org (http://www.mwis.org) is my site of choice, but as far as actual snow cover is concerned: well, alas there aren't any sites I know over which keep track of the snow line.  I usually try to find webcams pointed at reasonably nearby hills and work it out from there :)  However, I can see the Cheviots from the top of my street and know them fairly intimately, so you can just ask on here and I'll have a good idea how high up it is :lol: 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Monday 27 October 2014, 06:38:01 PM

www.mwis.org (http://www.mwis.org) is my site of choice, but as far as actual snow cover is concerned: well, alas there aren't any sites I know over which keep track of the snow line.  I usually try to find webcams pointed at reasonably nearby hills and work it out from there :)  However, I can see the Cheviots from the top of my street and know them fairly intimately, so you can just ask on here and I'll have a good idea how high up it is :lol: 


Cheers, aye canny I will keep your weather watching in mind if I head to the cheviots- assuming your not hanging from some Scottish ledge at the time. :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 30 October 2014, 09:53:31 AM
Was over the lakes yesterday, first day out for 5 weeks. Drove down to borrowdale parking at Seathwaite. I expected it to be quiet but forgot it was school holidays and ended up parking about 3/4 mile back from the farm. Went up to Styhead tarn and onto the corridor route. It was quite cold at first with no breeze but once the sun hit it rose to about 7/8 degrees. The corridor route was rammed, I had planned to go up onto Scafell pike but on seeing the numbers going up the path I went over to the col with Lingmell and then on a traversing path towards Scafell. The path is quite hard to find , not well used but follows a natural line. Went up Lords rake and up onto Scafell. Descended via foxes tarn. I took a photograph on zoom of Scafell Pike which showed 100+ on the summit cairn. Please I avoided it. Not wanting to go up to Mickeldore I dropped down to the great moss and went back up to Esk hause, dropped down to sprinkling tarn and styhead tarn and back to Seathwaite finishing in the dark. The weather had turned when on Esk Hause, the temperature dropping 4 or 5 degrees,.

All in a decent day, the thighs are hurting today. I shouldn't have left it for 5 weeks but the weather has been crap in that time. Must get out more often! Took 3 hours to get home, normally 2 but took an hour to clear Borrowdale and Keswick due to traffic congestion at the roundabout exiting the town

I would post pictures if I could work it out. Anybody give me an idiots guide?   
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Thursday 30 October 2014, 10:04:53 AM
Install an image capture tool on your web browser, capture the image and insert it as normal.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 30 October 2014, 05:50:06 PM
That's a good old hike, like :thup:  I love the Corridor Route; that bit above the drop into the gully where people have to scramble down is always a delight on a busy day, the fearful looks and various methods of descending the rock to that loose boulder at the bottom :)  I've never been up Lord's Rake.. have they taken away that sinister sign at the bottom which says that it's loose and dangerous..?

www.imgur.com is your friend when it comes to uploading pictures.  Drag them into the browser window and press "upload" and when it's done it'll give you a BBCode link for each one.  If they're bigger than about 1200 wide, you might like to consider changing the code from..

Code: [Select]
[img]etcetcetc[/img]

..to..


Code: [Select]
[img width=1000]etcetcetc[/img]
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jordan on Thursday 30 October 2014, 08:35:15 PM
Is Glencoe worth the drive to go to? I like quiet places with little people and great scenery, like Wastwater.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Thursday 30 October 2014, 08:36:26 PM
Absolutely!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jordan on Thursday 30 October 2014, 08:39:05 PM
Many people? I actually hate people  :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Thursday 30 October 2014, 08:44:13 PM
Not been for a long time but its fantastic.  Not sure what the tourism is like these days.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 30 October 2014, 09:14:35 PM
It's definitely worth the drive, much more spectacular than anything in England.. but busy.  Drive further north to Torridon :). More spectacular again, and quiet.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 30 October 2014, 09:16:03 PM
..but don't tell anybody about it :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 31 October 2014, 10:33:47 AM
Lords Rake, the warning sign at the bottom is no longer there or may be buried under the scree! Its a stiff pull up to the bottom of the rake on scree that is two steps forward and one back and then into Lords rake itself. The first 200 feet is loose scree where its best to keep to the right wall so you can use some footholds on the wall itself to aid progress and then the scree gradually eases to bare ground making progress easier. You then reach the chockstone at the top of the first section. The chockstone I think was what the original warning sign was about as its wedged at the top of the first part of the rake and has a fracture line at the bottom of it leaving it in a dangerous condition. Its been that way for about 15 years, in that time I've been that way 4 times and I don't think it has shifted. Its easy to get around the chockstone. You then drop about 80 feet and climb another gully/scree slope with open views down to Wasdale, this leads to another drop about 200 feet and then another scree clamber to a shoulder. From then its a mere walk and climb of about 500 feet  up to the top of Scafell. I prefer it to Scafell Pike as its not a mere walk and takes a bit more time and effort to get to the top Had a bit of an explore when on the top and I think next time, probably in the snow I will have a look at the path to the slight side area down to foxes tarn which has a Scottish hill look about it, worth an explore and a bit of ice axe work     
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 31 October 2014, 08:51:16 PM
Norwegian mountain seemingly about to collapse, moving at 1cm per hour recently

Exciting live cam:

http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/1.12008823 (http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/1.12008823)

1,200m mountain, so not far off Ben Nevis height :scared:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 31 October 2014, 09:06:10 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-29831584 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-29831584)

English version, which says that it might not actually be about to collapse :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Wullie on Friday 31 October 2014, 09:13:19 PM
Norwegian TV is known for airing hours of so-called slow TV such as knitting, wood burning and salmon fishing.

:lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 1 November 2014, 09:53:21 AM
Norwegian TV is known for airing hours of so-called slow TV such as knitting, wood burning and salmon fishing.

:lol:

Sounds tremendous, I wish we could get it over here :)  Mountain appears to be still there
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 3 December 2014, 02:15:15 PM
Just back from Onich again, better weather this time :)  So up to 43.  More than 15% done :frantic: :celb: :undecided: :lol:

Bonus images for Outdoors thread :)

(http://i.imgur.com/lKvkCHr.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/8nVjKwc.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ZaJqm4F.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/RhEgHkd.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/9x2ZVQs.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/9RxEsPL.jpg)

Snoopdawg, if you're still reading:

Was going to go up Buachaille Etive Mor today but the weather didn't justify it (one of those ones that you save for a good day, you know).  I've been up into Coire Tuilach before and not liked the look of the scree up to the ridge (I've done hideous scree runs on Scafell Pike and Beinn Eighe, and they're something I suspect I will always avoid if possible).  I'm guessing (and hoping) that this is a one you're familiar with, and you can tell me that either (a) the scree is not as bad as it looks, or (b) going up the grassy side from Glen Etive is a reasonable alternative route..?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 3 December 2014, 09:44:48 PM
Open C nice to see you had a nice time on your return. I have been up the Buachaille numerous times by various routes over the years including scrambling and rock climbing. The last time I was up Coire Tulaich was in November 2009 when the approach to the head wall was covered in wet snow. From what I recall there was a good walkable path through the rocks  around the right side of the corrie and then a final walk/clamber up the last 200 feet onto the col. I cant recall any difficulty so I would say its not as bad as it looks.

 I cant comment on the access from Glen Etive as I've never been up that way.

 There is another path from the glen between the Buachaille and Buachaille Etive Beag which is generally used as a descent route. The last time I came down that way was in 1999 so I cant comment on its state now.

Have you considered the curved ridge? don't know what you're scrambling capabilities are but if you fancy it May would be the best time. I'm going to say that for anybody with rock climbing skills its quite easy however  I'm aware that not everybody has the same levels. I'd meet you, but it was 1999 since I did it, maybe try a guide and do the aonoch eagach in the same trip?
 
I've been up the Cheviots of late, Border ridge and Windy Gyle from up the valley from alwinton last Monday and then Hedgehope via cunyan crags from Linhope on Sunday 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 3 December 2014, 09:53:00 PM
Curved Ridge is a definite no-go :lol:  I don't mind scrambling but I don't actively seek it out as some do, and will generally take the easy way if there is a one - not least because I like to take the dogs (I've already bypassed Aonach Eagach by climbing Sgorr nam Fiannaidh and Meall Dearg separately from the Loch Leven side).  I didn't see any path cutting through the scree at the headwall, but I didn't actually get that close to it and it's often the case that paths magically materialise as you get up to them.  Maybe I'll just wait for the snow to go and give the corrie another shot :) 

Planning benign-looking winter hills now since the snow is starting to arrive and my winter skills aren't quite what they should be so I'll stick to the less precipitous ones.  Ben Chonzie, and a few around Glen Lyon way (the horseshoe, Ben Challum, Sgiath Chuil, that sort of thing) will see me through the winter, maybe get me to 50 before next spring/summer rolls around.

I love the Cheviots :aww:  They're not even close to Scotland in terms of scenery but they have a wide-open charm and a quietness which is missing elsewhere in England.  I'd rather go to the Cheviots than the Lakes these days :)  I was up Hedgehope a couple of weeks back (standard ascent from Linhope past Linhope Spout) and I'm due Windy Gyle which I probably climb 15 to 20 times a year since it's just half an hour up the road from me.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 30 December 2014, 01:11:08 PM
Was over the lakes yesterday. Parked up at Mungrisdale and walked up the valley to the left of Bannerdale and continued on to Scales tarn. The weather wasn't great at first but then started to break. Got some decent views of Sharp edge as it broke.

(http://i.imgur.com/R2FwGszl.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/k6aFjRjl.jpg)

went up to the tops via a path from Scales tarn and along the saddle to Knowe crags

(http://i.imgur.com/3C7ctohl.jpg)

Drop back over to the top and descended via Foule crag and walked over to Bowscale fell

(http://i.imgur.com/LmKgNsDl.jpg)

Finished off via Bowscale tarn, down to the village and back along the road to Moungrisdale
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 30 December 2014, 01:24:42 PM
Recent photographs taken of clouds ( I,ve got a thing about clouds!) First one taken from Styhead tarn.

(http://i.imgur.com/PAX6vQAl.jpg)

Next two taken from Windy Gyle in the Cheviots.

(http://i.imgur.com/Yn17pTnl.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/0Lt1nvgl.jpg)

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: High Five o/ on Tuesday 30 December 2014, 02:15:07 PM
Love to read this stuff, and excellent pictures guys!
Seems i need a hiking trip to the UK  :aww:

Been on a few hikes over the Christmas period, but it have been so damn cold.
On the 26dec i went out at 07:00, then we had -25c. After 2 hours i lost feeling of my toes on the left foot.  :lol:
Started a fire, and managed to warm them up. Safe to say we turned back home at that point.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 30 December 2014, 02:26:59 PM
Love to read this stuff, and excellent pictures guys!
Seems i need a hiking trip to the UK  :aww:

Been on a few hikes over the Christmas period, but it have been so damn cold.
On the 26dec i went out at 07:00, then we had -25c. After 2 hours i lost feeling of my toes on the left foot.  :lol:
Started a fire, and managed to warm them up. Safe to say we turned back home at that point.

 :lol: jeesus man thats arctic survival, I give up on 2 hr jaunt in the lakes if it gets wet.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 30 December 2014, 03:13:55 PM
-25 that's unreal!! I think the record for the UK is -19 at Breamar. Its definitely stay indoors weather.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: High Five o/ on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 12:25:33 PM
It is cold, but if you layer up you will keep the warmth, at least while walking.  The problem is when i stop to rig my photo gear.
Hands and feet get almost instantly frozen. And its hard to regain the warmth again.
Its also quite fun when my beard get frozen over, looks like a f***ing polarbear :lol:

Its rarely this cold around my area, max a week pr year, most sane people stay inside in front of the fireplace. :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 12:28:29 PM
That's precisely why I got rid of my photo gear that requires stopping :lol:

Great shots snoopdawg, I love Blencathra in winter :aww:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 12:30:28 PM
Fancy getting myself some walking shoes.

No idea what I should be looking for though. Any ideas folks? :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 12:34:12 PM

For what sort of walking?  Roads and fields and forests, or rougher stuff?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 12:36:55 PM
Roads, fields and forests mainly.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 12:37:20 PM
The ones I got were spot on if you're thinking trails, fields, forests etc. Felt comfy from the very first wear.

http://www.newcastle-online.org/nufcforum/index.php/topic,34477.msg5054553.html#msg5054553

I got them from Start Outdoors in town, they had similar ones for men.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 12:39:33 PM

Aye, something like that will be fine for walks which are mostly low/flat/dry.  Biggest priority (imho) is that the soles are thick enough that you don't feel stones/branches/whatever every time you step on one :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: High Five o/ on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 12:57:46 PM
That's precisely why I got rid of my photo gear that requires stopping :lol:

Great shots snoopdawg, I love Blencathra in winter :aww:

Its not the gear that makes me stop, its more of the kind of shoots i want to get, if no tripod needed i shoot on the run of course  :)


Tooj, i have tested these a couple of times, absolutely stunning piece of gear. I know the guys making them, so simple, so effective.
http://www.fimbulvetr.no/

They are working on a smaller model now,  more for speed hiking. The one they have now is suited for carrying some gear like snowboard etc.

Quite expensive, so it depends how much you need a pair really.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 01:54:28 PM
Some more shots of Blencathra.

Looking down onto Sharp edge
(http://i.imgur.com/B0e3dnDl.jpg)

Looking down onto hallsfell ridge

(http://i.imgur.com/7vJkGjNl.jpg)

Looking down onto Scales tarn

(http://i.imgur.com/BvXdWyZl.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 01:58:04 PM
Tooj

best of luck with the footwear hunt. I've been looking for the last few months. You could have a look at Keen shoes, there is a model called Durand, I think with a mega thick sole. try a few reviews on line
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 02:19:18 PM
Thanks all. I shall report back. :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 02:36:03 PM
Now I've got the hang of imgur and uploads here's some shots from cairngorm trips.

Climbing out of Glen feshie

(http://i.imgur.com/kpuBnJ0l.jpg)

Yours truly at the top of the foxhunters path of Glen feshie

 (http://i.imgur.com/AoxVuB0l.jpg)

Beinn Bhrotain from Monadh Mor

(http://i.imgur.com/NjPjWowl.jpg)

and reverse Beinn Bhroatain from monadh mor

(http://i.imgur.com/fx7MdQvl.jpg)

area of overnight camp near Geldie Lodge

(http://i.imgur.com/9SkD3h7l.jpg)

Some shots of Glen feshie from the year before

(http://i.imgur.com/09G1lLrl.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/VIjYIeml.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/U54m8dcl.jpg)

Previous camp at geldie lodge
(http://i.imgur.com/d94DOVRl.jpg)

Tramp through the Lairig ghru

(http://i.imgur.com/sXqajgRl.jpg)

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 02:45:09 PM

Cairngorms :smitten:

Is that the path out of Glen Feshie that runs between Sgor Gaoith and Mullach Clach a Bhlair?  Or maybe the one further south that runs around the corrie?  Loved that path (the first one); it looked it was going to be really hard work but I found myself at 1000m in no time.  And where were you heading when you were at Geldie Lodge..?  Every time I read Geldie Lodge, I have horrible visions of having to do Carn an Fhidhleir and An Sgarsoch some day, which is not a round I'm looking forward to :lol:

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 03:05:20 PM
The path is the one going straight from Achlean and goes to the right of Carn ban mor. its an excellent, well maintained and drained path, slightly re routed by the estate in the last few years, for the better in my view as it contours better taking the strain of the legs.

The 2014 photograph at geldie lodge I was heading back to Achlean after doing Monadh mor and Beinn Brohtain on a 2 day trip.

The 2013 photograph at Geldie lodge I was doing a 4 day trip from Aviemore through Feshie, Geldie and the Lairig ghru.

I've still to do An Sgarsoch having done the other on a walk in from Linn of Dee but was too knackered to continue that day and have been every time I've been there since. Maybe I'll try a bike from Linn of Dee!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 06:00:41 PM
This thread has got me interested in climbing some hills with wor lass and the dogs. Got zero experience apart from wild camping so not a complete novice to the great outdoors. Going to get some kit and start off extremely light, thinking of trying those few hills around Stanhope, Collier Law, Bolts Law etc as a taster as they are within a shortish distance for us and wor lass might hate it  :D Anyone any advice?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 07:12:00 PM
Don't know that part of the world, but if you're around Newcastle you're about an hour or 90 minutes' drive from Blencathra, one of the best mountains in the Lakes and a great one to start with (harder work than you might think, though, if you're not used to hillwalking - try your local ones first as you say).  The Cheviots are probably the same distance from you and are more of an acquired taste :) 

As far as kit is concerned, you need to be carrying stuff which makes you warm and waterproof (including hands and head).  A bit of food and water, and you're good to go.  Boots if it's steep/rocky/pathless.  If the hills are pathless and/or there's the least danger of you getting lost, you should really have a map and a compass and know how to use them, but GPS is a wonderful thing and available on phones very easily these days.  Probably best not to rely on it, though.  Make sure you always know how to get back if you need to turn around.  It's surprising how similar everything looks 800 metres up in a thick mist :anguish:  It's not a great time of year to start, though - the days are short at the minute and definitely wait until there's no snow or ice if you're heading for the higher hills and mountains :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 07:47:57 PM
Cheers mate, I live in the Durham area so the lakes are 90 mile from me and the Cheviots about 70. Will hopefully progress to those places but they would have to be full days out. The North Pennines are much closer and the closest two hills I've picked out over 500m are Colliers law and Bolts law. Can't find much info on them but got a map on order. Will rock up and see what the craic is. Could be a piece of p*ss or could be hard as f*** I haven't got a clue really.  :lol:

We shall see.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 07:56:01 PM
Enjoy :thup: pick a good day for it, or you might never do it again :)

There's bound to be a good route description on the internet. Definitely make sure you know where you are, though :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 31 December 2014, 08:06:58 PM
Cheers, we've just had two perfect fine winters days for it.  Yeah I've found one or two links from people who have walked them and there seems to be paths to follow. Im already having nightmares of bogs and wor lass screaming at me though. :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Thursday 1 January 2015, 06:07:26 PM
OpenC, after a bit of advice. Have booked up a trip to Lochinver this month for a long weekend with the girlfriend. What mountains can we go up that are not too crazy and where's best to explore? Despite coming from the Western Isles I've never been around here I think, although been to Ullapool a million times obviously! Staying in one of these wee bad boys.

(http://goglamping.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/little-abodes-glamping-scotland-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 1 January 2015, 06:59:49 PM
Colin, never actually been to Lochinver but have done a few hills around that area. Hills around where you are staying such as Ben More Assynt, Conival, Quinag, Stac Pollaidh and Canisp.

Don't know youre level of experience but you,ve got to bear in mind that it might be a full on winter up in the hills next month requiring ice axe and crampons. A check of the weather forecast for today for example shows winds between 60 to 100MPH. As your from the western isles you will know how severe the weather can be in that area.

If the weather is naff for hill walking you could try some coastal walking for instance an 8 mile walk to Sandwood bay about 25  mile up the coast from you or there is a level walk straight from Lochinver to near to the base of Suilven. There is also a levelish walk from the Inchnadamph hotel to some caves.

If you want to drive a bit further there are the smoo caves near Durness.       
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Thursday 1 January 2015, 07:11:11 PM
Ah great, thanks for that snoopdawg. Yeah our level of experience is very, very little so if the weather is doing it's usual then won't be venturing up anything if it's going to require crampons. The walks sounds great, will check them out. I've actually been up to Smoo Cave - forgot about that, when I was younger and was in Durness as some of my family are originally from there.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 1 January 2015, 07:24:12 PM
Colin

You could also walk to Eas a,Chual Aluinn waterfall which at about 200 metres is the highest in the UK. It can be accessed from the south at Inchnadamph or the north from near Kylescu bridge
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 1 January 2015, 07:32:27 PM
Colin

You could try the walkhighlands website, its the one I use most for my Scottish walking. Do the drop down on walks on the header bar, select highlands and the select ullapool and assynt. You can then select assynt and coigach from there to give you a page of selected walks.

Enjoy your trip!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Thursday 1 January 2015, 07:54:34 PM
Great. Having a look just now.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 1 January 2015, 08:19:05 PM
I concur with snoopdawg, aye.  Not been that far up very often.  If the weather looks better further South you could drive down toward Gairloch/Kinlochewe and do some lower level stuff around Torridon as well (Beinn Eighe mountain trail by Loch Maree, amazing views of Slioch over the loch, also a remote but rewarding and reasonably low level walk around to Coire Mhic Fhearchair from the Torridon side) although that's a fair way from where you are.  If you wanted to stay local to Lochinver, I would be doing the walk to the bottom of Suilven personally :)  But aye, keep away from the mountains if there's snow on them and you're not prepared and experienced :thup:

Walkhighlands is a great site, really useful.

Looks like a great break colin, enjoy :thup:  Amazing part of the country, I love the way the mountains come from nothing and there's miles between them.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 1 January 2015, 08:22:38 PM
Actually, scratch that further South thing.  It's absolutely f***ing miles away :lol:  Had forgotten just how far it is from Ullapool up to Lochinver, and it's already a decent hike from Kinlochewe to Ullapool :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Thursday 1 January 2015, 09:03:18 PM
Cheers, loads of great info from you both.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Friday 2 January 2015, 11:39:08 AM
What was that you were saying about the weather Snoodawg?!

http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-30655967

Mean to be getting this plane in next few days....
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 11 January 2015, 05:06:36 PM
OpenC, need your advice. :lol: Like I say I've been obsessing over taking up hiking lately and after you suggested Blencathra I've been watching umpteen videos of it on YouTube. Sharp edge looks amazing (and Striding edge on Hellvelyn too for that matter.) Definitely going to attempt them come the summer. Now, the thing is I am that eager that I want to get cracking over in the lakes the sooner the better! I understand that there are various routes up BC but what is your opinion on a novice climbing the easiest route in the winter? Am I a total fool?  :lol:

I was planning on waiting for a forcasted fine, calm day and then heading up with the boy (13). Am I deluded? :D

Cheers.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Sunday 11 January 2015, 05:11:24 PM
RIP
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 11 January 2015, 05:15:25 PM
RIP

 :lol: Crikey.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 05:18:21 PM
Yeah, don't go up it when there's snow on it to be honest :(

The most usual easy route runs up the West flank from the Blencathra centre, but it's boring and tiring and might put you off before you even get started.  In my humble opinion, the best 'easy' route on Blencathra is to the East of the mountain (check the OS map to see where I'm talking about), starting at Scales Farm, going up the Mousethwaite Comb path to the jumble of paths which connect at the col between Scales Fell and Souther Fell, then following the path toward Sharp Edge but instead of going up it, head past it North West toward Mungrisdale Common, then turn South West toward Foule Crag / Atkinson Pike.  That way is close enough to the rocks to feel like real mountaineering but without any exposure or danger.  You'll get a good look at Sharp Edge from all angles as well.  And the final reason to go that way is that it hides the view of the rest of the lakes until you're at the top, which is an amazing reveal :)  Then, from Hallsfell Top, head down due East on Scales Fell, a good path with a couple of "woah, I'm really high up" moments but again with no danger (make sure you turn North at the right time to reconnect with the path you left earlier).  The whole round just takes three or four hours, and is a really great first mountain experince :)  Let me know if you're going to give it a shot, and I'll do a more comprehensive route guide for you :)

If there's no snow/ice and it's just cold, then go for it.. but really, I wouldn't go near it in proper winter conditions without prior experience (sorry).  And if you go for it, and it turns out to be snowier or icier than you expected, then you have to be prepared to write it off, turn around and go back down.

Cat Bells is sometimes viewed as an "easy" option but is a great way to find out how you feel on steepish rock sections.  And it's much lower, so attracts less snow.  If you can't wait until the spring, keep an eye on that one maybe?  You can get a reasonable idea of the current snow conditions at weatherline here (http://www.lakedistrictweatherline.co.uk/).  The assessors are usually on or around Helvellyn, almost 100m higher than Blencathra, but the conditions are usually fairly close.  If there's snow in the pictures, I wouldn't risk Blencathra :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 11 January 2015, 05:48:36 PM
Thanks for the swift response fellas cheers.  :lol:

Nah seriously, thanks that's what I was after. Its definitely a no go now till the snow goes. I will climb it its just a matter of when so I'll definitely hit you up for more tips beforehand OC cheers. In the mean time I'll check out Cat Bells.

I've been beasting the roads recently with the dogs in a bid to get my fitness up a bit but I am just too eager to hit the lakes! Woah there Cowboy. :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 06:08:55 PM
If you have the bug already, then have a look at this vague map of where I mean and try to follow the real paths on the map :thup:

(http://i.imgur.com/83UHfVI.jpg)

Also, download Google Earth and you can recce it in 3D in advance, which I do all the time and which cuts down immeasurably on map checking to have to find out where you are.  If you already know the lie of the land, it's much easier to know where you're heading for.

In 3D:

(http://i.imgur.com/EmJHIef.jpg)

Sharp Edge is the ridge above the tarn which the route circles :)

Give it a few years and you'll be heading for Scotland for this sort of thing..

Spoiler
(http://i.imgur.com/ICZnZAE.jpg)

(vertical height exaggerated, but not by any more than Blencathra was)

Have a search for Horns of Alligin or Liathach ridge for details :)

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Sunday 11 January 2015, 06:14:27 PM
If you have the bug already, then have a look at this vague map of where I mean and try to follow the real paths on the map :thup:

(http://i.imgur.com/83UHfVI.jpg)

Also, download Google Earth and you can recce it in 3D in advance, which I do all the time and which cuts down immeasurably on map checking to have to find out where you are.  If you already know the lie of the land, it's much easier to know where you're heading for.

In 3D:

(http://i.imgur.com/EmJHIef.jpg)

Sharp Edge is the ridge above the tarn which the route circles :)

Thats looks the same route we normally take, except i go left instead of going up sharp edge.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 06:15:25 PM

Aye, there are a couple of options that way too; you can either head straight up my descent route, or you can climb up to Scales Tarn and there's a good path up from there that joins my descent route near the summit.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Sunday 11 January 2015, 06:20:24 PM

Aye, there are a couple of options that way too; you can either head straight up my descent route, or you can climb up to Scales Tarn and there's a good path up from there that joins my descent route near the summit.

Aye, I think thats what we do/did.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 06:37:59 PM
Blencathra is nothing like the aforementioned Liathach but this..

this video (http://vimeo.com/87661426)

..will give you a reasonable idea of why you should keep off the mountains in the winter unless you know what you're doing.

This is it on a better day; if you like the idea of Sharp Edge and Striding Edge, places like this are what you aspire to in the UK

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwcDRwK-aK8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwcDRwK-aK8)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Sunday 11 January 2015, 06:48:18 PM
Blencathra is nothing like the aforementioned Liathach but this..

this video (http://vimeo.com/87661426)

..will give you a reasonable idea of why you should keep off the mountains in the winter unless you know what you're doing.

This is it on a better day; if you like the idea of Sharp Edge and Striding Edge, places like this are what you aspire to in the UK

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwcDRwK-aK8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwcDRwK-aK8)

That looks class, I would love that but i dont think i could cope with walking near the edge mind.  I would love to do a walk in the snow but have no skill set to do it.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 06:55:48 PM

I didn't do the ridge myself :)  There's one munro at either side, I climbed them both individually :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 11 January 2015, 07:17:50 PM
Excellent info OC thanks yeah that was the route up BC that I had scouted out myself. Re sharp edge, from the videos I've seen the last bit looks steep as f*** but what's it like in reality?

Those vids are class too. 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 07:19:11 PM
Aye, it's pretty steep.  Feels better when you're on it than when you look at it, but that's why I would recommend Cat Bells first.  Halfway along Sharp Edge is no place to find out that you don't actually like exposure after all :lol:

I'm pretty sure I've posted this in here already but Sharp Edge and the like are a bit artificial to me; ultimately, there's always a harder way that you could go if you wanted to, and that includes Sharp Edge.  Seeking out scrambling routes like that doesn't make any sense to me; I'd climb it if I had to (and on a few Scottish mountains, you have no choice but to do bits like that), but if I could go around it I always would these days :)  That said, plenty of people do harder routes for the adrenaline and as long as they're getting a good day out of being on the mountains, who am I to judge :)

I would say, though, that you should do it yourself first before taking a 13 year old over it.  People do get stuck there, and people do die there, and you're best off knowing exactly what you want to put him through before committing.  Serious advice :thup:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 07:39:34 PM

And since we're on a pictureless page, have this special edition Glen Etive / Glencoe shot :)

(http://i.imgur.com/vQwUdLu.jpg)

The day that two or three more people start posting their own pictures from the mountains in this thread.. :aww: :smitten: :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 11 January 2015, 08:24:00 PM
As we are adding pictures! here's one of my favourites taken in 2008 on Creag Meagaidh coming down from the window ,

(http://i.imgur.com/ACeZu2u.jpg?2)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 11 January 2015, 08:40:21 PM
Open C

Been looking through some old photos and was thinking of your question regarding the buichaille. Found these photos taken over the years when looking.
The Buichaille from near the Kinghouse.

(http://i.imgur.com/W8P9H0Bl.jpg)

The Buichaille from Larganbargh

(http://i.imgur.com/DqCNPyVl.jpg)

Coire na Tulaich. You can just see the path in the bottom right of the picture. it continues around the rim of the coire and up the spur in the middle

(http://i.imgur.com/3OhdXoPl.jpg)

View down the Coire from the col at the top.The whole slope  is prone to avalanche

(http://i.imgur.com/l4R8iv6l.jpg)

The track along to the top of the buichaille. There's a surprise thinning of the summit ridge just shy of the summit

(http://i.imgur.com/ERVwLzKl.jpg)

View back towards the Glencoe hills. The col at the top of Coire na Tulaich can be seen down to the right.

(http://i.imgur.com/qmFNh0Xl.jpg)

View down in the coire over a temperature inversion

(http://i.imgur.com/BbbKP7Al.jpg)

Looking down from the Buichaille summit to the top of Crowberry tower and Curved ridge

(http://i.imgur.com/6xnbkX7l.jpg)

The summit looking over Rannoch moor

(http://i.imgur.com/GysisHRl.jpg)

Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 08:40:43 PM
That's a great shot :thup: never imagined creag meagaidh looking like that, is that coire ardair?
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 08:42:28 PM
And great shots of the buachaille as well. I really should take more shots as I go, I don't take nearly enough :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 11 January 2015, 08:50:40 PM
It is coire adair, ,I,ll dig some more out.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 11 January 2015, 09:12:48 PM
Three more shots of Coire adair. I've got more somewhere.

(http://i.imgur.com/bQbalFCl.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/co8KrEsl.jpg)

the accepted route goes up to the right through the window

(http://i.imgur.com/BAF7U91l.jpg)

Open C, if you get the chance put this on your winter/ spring list. There is a 3 mile walk in from the parking area at Aberader farm, where I quite often kip overnight in the van, then up towards the window which flattens out on the col. You then turn to the left and walk up to the false summit at Megs cairn. The actual summit is a levelish 1/2 mile walk over the plateau. If you are up for it you can straight uphill from aberader towards the munro top of Carn liath and continue on to Stob Poite coire ardair and continue on the high level circuit to Creag Megaidh summit 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 11 January 2015, 09:21:41 PM
It's been on my list for a while, always heard great things about it but since you can't see a damn thing from the Laggan road it's a difficult one to prioritise.

Looks amazing though, will get it done this year (back in onich in April and that's close enough).  Next one I have planned is a four for the price of one from Glenshee; Carn an Tuirc, Tolmount, Tom Buidhe and Carn of Claise. About 20km and 1km of climbing, shouldn't be too awkward.  Maybe 6 or 7 hours, I'm hoping.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 11 January 2015, 09:37:53 PM
Some more shots of Coire adair. First three taken after ascending Sron a Choire

(http://i.imgur.com/xgzix0jl.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/m8fAJAtl.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/2DcToCtl.jpg)

summit slopes

(http://i.imgur.com/uTY95Rzl.jpg)

Photo from the top of the window

(http://i.imgur.com/KX0DUAkl.jpg)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 13 January 2015, 08:20:23 PM
Pedro111 as per the previous posts I would also give Sharp edge a miss until either the snow goes or you build a bit more experience. There is an awkward exposed step in the middle which you either clamber over or take on the north side which is a smooth downward sloping rock which a slip on deposits you on the north side about 100 feet below. Its where Keswick mountain rescue apparently do more of their rescues. Also the exit slopes from Sharp edge as you have seen from my previous photograph are quite steep and not for the inexperienced. I've been walking, scrambling and climbing for 40+ years and its not somewhere I'm keen to go at the minute. As a slightly alternative route can I suggest the following that I posted on another side?

http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=48423

If you mad keen to get out winter walking and maybe develop your abilities and skills can I suggest a couple of alternatives? I,ve put in photographs to show you the ground

Swirral Edge taken from Catsyecam in December. You don't have to do Swirral edge. Helvellyn could be ascended by the zig zag path from the YH and a narrow-ish arête is taken to above brown crags.

(http://i.imgur.com/xPtw2DF.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/htbmJrf.jpg?1)

Photograph to show that the ground is not as steep as it first looks. done when the ground is steeper as the loose rocks are bound together
(http://i.imgur.com/PMJdU3D.jpg?1)

Photo taken from above Swirral edge

(http://i.imgur.com/QMlZMO0.jpg?1)

Finally couldn't resist this one!

(http://i.imgur.com/aRHeo09.jpg?1)

Fairfield is a good winter hill too. I normally go from the car park at hartsop, walk around Brotherswater and ascend up by Dovedale. The summit is a 2 mile walk from the top of the Dovedale path. The descent I normally take is by Cofa Pike and onto St Sunday crag. Fairfield and Pillar are probably my favourite Lakeland hills. The descent as you can see by the photographs taken on different days is a good testing grounds for developing confidence on steep or snow covered ground

Coming off the top of Fairfield. There are two paths, one comes down the nose, another cuts back at an angle to avoid the slope

(http://i.imgur.com/ljyOMAJ.jpg?1)

Another photograph taken to show the ground to the top of cofa pike
(http://i.imgur.com/W3XCvvt.jpg?1)

Fairfield showing Cofa pike up towards St sunday crag

(http://i.imgur.com/RkrNyOV.jpg?1)

Several more shots from below Cofa Pike.
(http://i.imgur.com/YBgX7zN.jpg?1)
(http://i.imgur.com/Q0ZyFZI.jpg?1)
(http://i.imgur.com/ZODbCZJ.jpg?2)
.
I could suggest several others you could walk in the snow like Grisedale pike. This zoom photograph was taken from the road to Skiddaw as despite doing that hill over a dozen times it would seem to be the only digital photograph I have
 (http://i.imgur.com/wY4v9WX.jpg?1)

You can just pick out the ridge to the summit which if banked up with snow makes it interesting. You could do a round of this taking in Hobcarton crag,Grasmoor and Tarn crag which has a narrow arête from the summit.

 The whole of the lakes is full of hills to develop your skills and when you have learnt them and feel happy on to SCOTLAND!   
   
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 13 January 2015, 08:26:03 PM

Great post :thup:  Not sure I'd be touching Cofa Pike in winter though, tbh :)

Quote
The whole of the lakes is full of hills to develop your skills and when you have learnt them and feel happy on to SCOTLAND! 

This :thup:  But don't go to the Scottish mountains too early, or it'll ruin your lakes experience because the hills there feel positively tiny when you get used to Scottish days :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 14 January 2015, 04:31:15 PM
Snoopdawg, I appreciate all the great information man, thanks. To be honest after the replies to my post the other day, I'm concerned about biting off more than I can chew when it comes to the snow. Would hate to walk off the edge of a cliff because of my ignorance! :lol: Fitness is another issue. At the moment I can walk about 10 miles before I start yearning for a lie down!, and that is on fairly flat ground with a max elevation change of about 100m. Not sure how id fare with these huge climbs! Once the weather softens in the spring I will have a crack at the big boys but I think the best bet is to start off gently. Somewhere that is hard to get lost and no more than about 6-8 mile walk max.

Need to be broke in gently. What a puff. :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 14 January 2015, 06:08:07 PM

Blencathra was my first proper mountain, and I was f***ed when I got to the top :)  It doesn't matter how many times you need to stop :thup:

You're right, though; you'll enjoy it more in the Spring as well.  Even just waiting for the longer days means you don't have to set out from home in the dark and be constantly worrying about how quickly you're making progress.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 18 January 2015, 08:29:31 PM
Crap weather in the Lakes today. Set away at 7 this morning. Because I've done the lakes over and over again when I set away I usually have 4 or 5 loose plans of walks to do that day. Apart from being held up on the M6 because of a crash the roads were quite decent so decided to go down to Seathwaite in Borrowdale arriving around 9. The MWIS weather service had indicated winds of 15/20 MPH and possibly gusts of 40MPH, sunshine and clear hills around midday. Set off towards Stockley bridge and go up Grain Gill. The photographs show the weather at the time and the snow conditions
(http://i.imgur.com/X6C5vss.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/PHZl19s.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/rgnJWOB.jpg?1)

At first there was little wind as I ascended Grains Gills up to the path that climbs from Sprinkling Tarn. The path then continues onto Esk Hause onto the shelter. Initially I was going to go to Bowfell and back to Esk pike but because of the strengthening wind I thought I would go along the Scafell path. The wind at this stage picked up over the open ground and whilst I've no recording equipment I swear it was more the 40MPH,with snow pinging the legs and face. There was deep snow drifts everywhere with loose unconsolidated snow making walking difficult. The clouds did start to break giving views towards Pillar

(http://i.imgur.com/9kVVPBV.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/KIoJFLG.jpg?1)

I then descended from Ill crags with the intention of ascending Scafell Pike from the col

(http://i.imgur.com/ixrYzgy.jpg?1)

When I got to the Col known as windy Gap the wind picked up ferociously.Sitting in the col before Scafell trying to find shelter its amazing how quickly the cold zaps your strength. The gloves I had been wearing were wet and required a change but trying to get them out of the rucksack was an ordeal.  I managed to get up about 50 feet up towards Scafell ice axe in one hand and walking pole in the other. During that time the wind had knocked me over twice forcing a retreat back down into the col and walking back the way I came. I did consider dropping down to the Corridor route from the col but the wind and spindrift would have been blasting in my face. The heavy winds continued all the way down to Styhead. The views ,however opened up
 
(http://i.imgur.com/G9q5fng.jpg?1)

Next purchase I think will be a pair of goggles! 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 18 January 2015, 09:14:41 PM
Looks like a great day, tremendous pictures :)  I never forget my ski goggles in the winter, proper lifesavers.  Never been further than the top of Calf Cove under snow, those hidden rocks and crevasses were too intimidating for me :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 18 January 2015, 11:20:25 PM
If anybody fancies a walk in the hills at this time of year, think twice unless you know what you're doing.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cumbria-30871294
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Tuesday 20 January 2015, 12:20:46 AM
Bloody hell! Those kind of pictures are what really stoke my interest in this lark and make me want to get out there tomorrow! Then mick posts that link and I'm suddenly glad I'm going to wait till the snows gone!

Seriously though, fantastic shots.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 20 January 2015, 09:51:18 AM
Thanks for that. To be honest photographs 4, 5 and 6 were taken pointing into a ferocious wind, point and press and hope for the best.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Tuesday 20 January 2015, 12:31:55 PM
Some fanatsic pics lads! 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 21 January 2015, 06:30:36 PM

Think I might head to the Lakes this weekend myself, I haven't used my axe or crampons in anger this winter yet and Scotland doesn't look too promising, although I was saving Ben Chonzie for exactly this sort of weekend :)  I like the Lakes in winter when they're quiet.  In summer in Cumbria, I find I spend too much time just looking at mountains from a traffic jam :anguish:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 22 January 2015, 06:50:18 PM
Something a bit different. On days when I've got nothing on I got often go out for a 5 miles + walk around the doors just to keep the fitness levels ticking over. Today I got dropped off on Waskerley moor and started walking on the sustrans track back to the Consett area, back along the Derwent walk back home. The whole area is covered by old railway lines given excellent walking routes. In all I reckon I covered about 12 miles in about 3 1/2 hrs. I,ve also got a new pair of boots to wear in before I take them on the hills so the tracks are ideal for this. Here's some shots of the walking

(http://i.imgur.com/Zx63lXb.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/YAWKNqc.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/Tyx8kS4.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/bmIxTiN.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/T7LITB6.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/fkdQNV4.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/P32462S.jpg?1)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Thursday 22 January 2015, 07:19:27 PM

Think I might head to the Lakes this weekend myself, I haven't used my axe or crampons in anger this winter yet and Scotland doesn't look too promising, although I was saving Ben Chonzie for exactly this sort of weekend :)  I like the Lakes in winter when they're quiet.  In summer in Cumbria, I find I spend too much time just looking at mountains from a traffic jam :anguish:

I go to the lakes during every month of the year and the only real problem I have is heading into Ambleside from either direction or from the north into Windermere, both at times you would expect traffic.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 22 January 2015, 08:07:07 PM

You're luckier than me, then.  The road through Borrowdale / Honister / Buttermere / Crummock Water (the road that all my favourite mountains are on, pretty much) can be an absolute bloody nightmare in summer.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Friday 23 January 2015, 11:31:47 AM
Snoopdawg those pictures are excellent. That area is no too far from me. Need to get out there its just finding the time with work etc.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Friday 23 January 2015, 11:49:30 AM
Is there anywhere in the south of England you guys know about? I'm well jel.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 23 January 2015, 06:50:53 PM
Ian W, afraid not, the only time I,ve headed southwards to go walking was into North wales back in 1998. Every journey since then is either west to the lakes or north to Scotland.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Friday 23 January 2015, 08:47:52 PM
Been out doing a sound workshop all week with Chris Watson, the recordist for all David Attenborough bbc shows and generally regarded as the top wildlife recordist about. Has been a great week. Didn't know Ayrshire had such nice bits at all. s**** photos alert, on my phone and I'm no photographer.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-rxBKarFRZm0/VMKvlnARQkI/AAAAAAAAAOg/UcnOTzF-18c/s1533-d/DSC_0614.JPG)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-6-EjapIrA9k/VMKvraucYKI/AAAAAAAAAOs/-NQNzOD_SwE/s1533-d/DSC_0616.JPG)

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-o-AvK61A12A/VMKvWip-32I/AAAAAAAAAOE/hBk1iet-Ny4/s1533-d/DSC_0620.JPG)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-gow9y0OvbiU/VMKvcim2cDI/AAAAAAAAAOU/eFBBttEOXnw/s1533-d/DSC_0623.JPG)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 24 January 2015, 10:16:25 AM
Nice pics Colin, I see winter is still in full flight in Scotland. Ayrshire is full of surprises having Arran and Galloway on its doorstep.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 24 January 2015, 11:08:30 AM
Been doing a bit of research of late as I am planning to do the Cape wrath trail in early may this year using wild camping, bothies and the occasional hotel/bunkhouse to stay in. Its about 200 miles and I aim to take 18/19 days to complete it. I did attempt it in September last year but crap weather, gales and boots that I really should have replaced saw me abandon the attempt. Doing the research and going over all photographs I've compiled some old photographs of wild camping spots and the occasional bothy. There's more wild camping spots that I haven't got photos of such as Sourlies area on Loch Nevis, Derry lodge in the Cairngorms, the bealeach between Ben Avon and Beinn Bhuird, Fords of Avon, Loch ecthachan and many more. Heres some pics.

Near Loch Ossian
(http://i.imgur.com/aZ1ppqQ.jpg?1)

Near loch Pattack
(http://i.imgur.com/AT5DQjE.jpg?1)

Same location as previous looking the other way, that night a horrendous storm blew in
(http://i.imgur.com/xDD0OgD.jpg?1)

Top of Ennerdale in the lakes
(http://i.imgur.com/v1hv4wv.jpg?1)

A favourite place, Barrisdale bay In Knoydart
(http://i.imgur.com/hkhq5gk.jpg?1)

Moal Bhuide bothy
(http://i.imgur.com/EqxZOtk.jpg?1)

Below the Bealach Bernais, achnashellach area
(http://i.imgur.com/wTguuqx.jpg?1)

Below The Devils point in the cairngorms
(http://i.imgur.com/4jUuLoM.jpg?1)

Glen tilt, about a mile short of the Bedford bridge reminds of some of the Cheviot valleys
(http://i.imgur.com/N6Ycm3b.jpg?1)

Below the Bealach dubh Ben alder
(http://i.imgur.com/954vfVT.jpg?1)

Loch trieg
(http://i.imgur.com/3PQ4nLz.jpg?1)

A badly pitched tent just below Sgurr Mor in Knoydart
 (http://i.imgur.com/E7cLMuo.jpg?1)

Same location different angle
(http://i.imgur.com/keZ7h48.jpg?1)

Bealach dubh late September and the midges still biting, ba*****s!
(http://i.imgur.com/pPNsJnV.jpg?1)

Just around the corner from Meanach bothy, Glen nevis area
(http://i.imgur.com/KswPRZt.jpg?1)

Glen Loyne, claunie area
(http://i.imgur.com/U8wtWAxl.jpg)

Kinbreak bothy, an absolute life saver
(http://i.imgur.com/VownG3w.jpg?1)

Midges!!
(http://i.imgur.com/G8PTG8J.jpg?1)

Bealach dubh near Loch Ossian
(http://i.imgur.com/U5BEuAi.jpg?1)
Below Ben alder,below the short leachas, about 1800 feet up.
(http://i.imgur.com/V3noRyc.jpg?1)

Same location as previous different angle
(http://i.imgur.com/15bMyud.jpg?1)

Luxury camping! Loch na Keal on Mull below Ben More
(http://i.imgur.com/onj5pZk.jpg?1)

Corrour Bothy in the Lairig Ghru
(http://i.imgur.com/Q5X0nde.jpg?1)

Geldie Lodge In the cairngorms
(http://i.imgur.com/d94DOVRl.jpg)
Bottom of Honister pass in the old van
(http://i.imgur.com/tJriDuE.jpg?1)

Below Bowfell in the lakes
(http://i.imgur.com/5zc10GK.jpg?1)

Approach to Goatswater, Coniston, Dow crag in the background
(http://i.imgur.com/AwKLIrT.jpg?1)

Glen Nevis
(http://i.imgur.com/mW4s4pr.jpg?1)

apologies if theres too many photographs but since I mastered Imgur and uploading I'm like a kid with a new toy!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 24 January 2015, 11:49:59 AM
Only way to live :smitten:

I approve of as many pictures as people want to post in this thread :thup:

I headed to the Cheviots today since the forecast was better here than Northwest.  Unfortunately, there's a fine line in the Cheviots in winter - a balance that has to be struck between climbing them when the snow is there, and actually getting to the bottom of them when the approach farm roads aren't still covered in thick and dangerous ice.  Alas, the high Cheviots looked magnificent from the A697 but as soon as I turned off at Wooler I knew I wasn't getting to Langleeford for the Cheviot and Hedgehope circuit as I planned.  The only place I could think of that has a flat approach was Yeavering Bell in the far North, so I headed that way.  Inspired by snoopdawg's earlier post detailing the walk, here's a few from mine.  Apologies for the unusual white balance; it was a strange old winter sunshine day.

Yeavering Bell is just a little hill (361 metres, about 300 metres of climbing) and I'd never climbed it on a good day, but had heard good things about the view of Hedgehope and Cheviot from the top.

(http://i.imgur.com/C7kP1Om.jpg)
As always, it's difficult to convey steepness in a picture.  The direct approach from Old Yeavering is fairly steep a lot of the way, it's a great training walk and will suit anybody who fancies a go on steeper ground for the first time to see what it's all about.

(http://i.imgur.com/ZmBs8N3.jpg)
Lola half way up.  It looks like it'll be a rocky path from the road but it's not, the path just cuts through a couple of rock and scree bands in a big old Ben Nevis style zigzag.

(http://i.imgur.com/qb1gUTN.jpg)
The state of the path higher up.  Those finger markers are obvious the whole way as the path starts to get sketchier higher up.

(http://i.imgur.com/xVlFbEF.jpg)
The wall of the hillfort on the top.

(http://i.imgur.com/CTy0gb3.jpg)
Cheviot and Hedgehope, where I was supposed to be heading originally.  It is a great view, and includes a lot of the coast (or it would on a less hazy day than today).  If I was in the Cairngorms, I would probably just have pushed on to do those two from where I was.. I'm not, though, so I didn't :)

(http://i.imgur.com/G6PkpNO.jpg)
The arty version with the summit cairn :)


Great little walk, would recommend it to anybody who hasn't done it or anybody who fancies a first go at a hill.  As I say, for anybody based around Northumberland I can't think of a better training exercise or a way to find out how the higher hills feel without having to set foot on them and without having to commit to a four or five hour, nine mile walk into the unknown :)  It's miles better than Simonside, and much quieter (not another soul there this morning).
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 24 January 2015, 12:02:36 PM
Open C you must up and about early. Nice shots, like the one with the dog.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 24 January 2015, 12:03:12 PM
And aye Colin, must be tremendous to have a job like that :thup: Have you had your weekend in the North West yet..?  I suspect you didn't get to many summits with the weather there's been up there..

Is there anywhere in the south of England you guys know about? I'm well jel.

Not really, although a lot of Southerners swear by the gentle rolling hills they have down there.  Depends where you are.. Devon and Cornwall are probably worth a look, and the Brecon Beacons in Wales are like a bigger version of the Cheviots (I did a walk around four summits in the Beacons, Pen-y-Fan, Cribyn, Corn Du and the tremendously named Fan-y-Big, and I enjoyed it massively).  I haven't done much there but North Wales is a bit overrated in my humble opinion.. they are at least real mountains, though, unlike the other areas I've mentioned.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 24 January 2015, 12:04:23 PM
Open C you must up and about early. Nice shots, like the one with the dog.

I live about 20 miles from Wooler so the Cheviots are fairly well on my doorstep :)  Didn't leave the house until around 9, which is something I can't do if I want to get a Scottish mountain in :)
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Saturday 24 January 2015, 11:57:40 PM
Great pics everybody, snoopdawg is like a Ray Mears/Bear Grylls hybrid by the looks of things. :D

And Open C I get the hint!  :lol: Looks class that. Only 74 miles or 1hr 40 mins from my house :yao: how long is the walk itself? I did 7 mile today with the dog without even really feeling it so the fitness is getting there. Nearly hit the deck a few times on the ice on the trails where I live but I survived!
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 25 January 2015, 06:41:51 AM
Wasn't aimed directly at you because it is a long way from you, but if you're uncertain how your energy will last on steep ground, it's a perfect one since there's not a massive walk in.  You do that one, you'll probably spend twice as long in the car as on the hill; in terms of horizontal distance covered, it's probably not even two miles.  I was up and down in just over an hour.  You can, however, extend the walk to make the drive more worthwhile..

North up the A697 until you're through Wooler, and then it's the B6351 at Akeld, signposted Kirknewton and Yetholm (there are flagpoles there, for some reason).  It's just a mile or two down that road; it's the hill on your left.  Pass a stone gated layby on the right (labelled Ad Gefrin) and get ready to turn left toward the cottages you can see ahead of you.  Park on the grass verge on the little road that leads to the cottages, walk past them and at the knackered old barn past them you'll see a signpost through the gate for Yeavering Bell.  From there, just follow the path :thup: 

If you get to the top with energy to spare, as you probably will after ten minutes recuperation and look around the hillfort, you can carry on toward a much bigger but also relatively unknown hill called Newton Tors (two tops at 438 and 537 metres) which overlooks the College Valley and the interesting side of Cheviot.  Again, the paths are good but once you drop off Yeavering Bell, your car will disappear and you're into the realm of potentially getting lost if you don't keep a good track of where you are.  Buy the map (OS16) even though the very start of the walk is off the top of it, and you can have a practice at navigation while you're going :thup:  You can also take an alternative route back to the car if you push on from the top.. that said, it's useful to practice going down steep grass as well, since that's where most hillwalking accidents happen, so in the interests of practice and fitness, I would recommend going back over the top of Yeavering Bell (will be a 100m reascent from the other side) on the return journey.

If you're taking a dog, there are usually sheep on the top and while the farmers are OK with dogs off leads if they're under control, they can see you from miles away and if your dog is just belting around randomly a long way from you, you can expect a bit of grief from them.  If you're taking a dog and continuing to Newton Tors, definitely have it under control since there are hidden narrow peat holes all over that area which you do not want it dropping into.

Save it for a nice day to maximise the views; it's not so inspiring on a grey cloudy day.  You won't get lost, though, and it will let you check your fitness level.  Most mountain days have between two and four times the initial ascent, as an indicator, but usually not all that steep and generally not all at once.  If you manage this walk, and then subsequently add the two tops of Newton Tors as well, that would be about 10km and probably around 600 or 700m of ascent which is pretty much a standard Lake District day and would also get you to the top of a lot of munros in Scotland.

Full route is..

Spoiler
(http://i.imgur.com/dZecMOz.jpg)

In case of extreme weariness if you've pushed on but can't be bothered to reascend Yeavering Bell on return, following St. Cuthbert's Way north at the crossroads between Yeavering Bell and Easter Tor will drop you down to the farm road that you started on; turn right when you reach it.  It says "fords" on the map but I don't remember having to get my feet wet there.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 25 January 2015, 10:38:11 AM
Ray Mears/ bear Ghrylls hybrid? Don't know if that's a compliment or an insult!!

Ray Mears seems a bit overfed for an adventurer and watching his programmes he never seems to get that far.Bear Ghrylls is a bit like marmite, you either like or dislike. He is a highly skilled bloke and you cant knock his achievements but some of the TV stuff is just for the audience. I remember him standing in a cairngorm blizzard/gale with jacket fully open and no headgear on!

Seriously though I couldn't survive off the land, I'd be fu***d without the tent, stove and packets of dehydrated pasta 
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 25 January 2015, 05:39:58 PM
OC, I will definitely do that walk. Thanks for all the detailed route mapping it is a real help. Also how accurate do you lads reckon the OS maps are? Its just that I have one for my local area and twice now there has been no path where it says there should be one. Just farmers fields with no a hint of a track.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 25 January 2015, 05:51:27 PM

The maps are generally amazingly accurate in terms of landscape features; the paths are more transient.  It'll probably indicate a right of way that farmers would prefer people not to use hence they're not advertised or maintained.  I think after a certain period of nobody using a right of way the landowner has the right to cancel it and stop folk walking over their land.  There are also loads of paths in existence which aren't on OS maps.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 25 January 2015, 06:00:02 PM
Additionally, I took a wider view of the horizon from Yeavering Bell which shows Newton Tors, the black hill to the right and in front of Cheviot. 

(http://i.imgur.com/FZ6eQ2S.jpg)

As you can see, it's still not massive (and is much less steep than the first one) but it's a significantly bigger hill; higher than the majority of the hills in the Peak District or Dartmoor, for example.  There's a steady descent (toward the sheep in the picture) and reascent required to get to it, which is always character building.  You can see the paths on it, which are very distinctive but after rain also very wet :anguish:  Easter Tor, the first summit, is the bump at the far right and is a nice little craggy outcrop, good spot for dinner.  The true top is the rounded bump off to its left.  If you were feeling particularly strong, you can finish the hill off by visiting Harelaw, not far from the true top.  Once you reach that side, Cheviot looks like a proper hill/mountain with the deep corries of Bizzle Crags and Hen Hole cut into its side, a view you don't get from anywhere else (it looks like a great big slug on the horizon from most vantage points).

Enjoy, when you get there :thup:  Seriously, though, pick a good day.  It's one thing to, as Wainwright put it, 'feel the wind on the heath, brother' (nearly knocked me over as I was taking these pictures, in fact); but the Cheviots can be purgatorial, and dangerous, in the wrong weather.
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 25 January 2015, 06:05:20 PM

And finally, next time somebody with the power to do this sort of thing is reading here, can we change the title to just plain old The Great Outdoors..?  Or can I do it myself since I started the thread?  No idea :lol:
Title: Re: Wild Camping and The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 25 January 2015, 08:24:06 PM

And finally, next time somebody with the power to do this sort of thing is reading here, can we change the title to just plain old The Great Outdoors..?  Or can I do it myself since I started the thread?  No idea :lol:
Do it yourself in the first post.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 25 January 2015, 09:04:09 PM

:thup: cheers
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Monday 26 January 2015, 11:37:45 AM
(http://s7.postimg.org/75f1ytk8b/pen_y_fan.jpg)

Was staying in a cottage in Brecon this weekend. Went up Pen-Y-Fan, really good dramatic walk and decent views all the way up. We had planned to do a loop of the summits but we got up a little late and I didn't fancy dragging my girlfriend around in the failing light.  Picture isn't very good quality sadly as I only had my phone on me and I couldn't actually see the screen.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 26 January 2015, 02:19:33 PM
shots from a Scafell walk in October.
Link to report http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=49050

Vista from the approach path to styhead tarn. Lingmell on the right, scafell Pike centre

(http://i.imgur.com/YwS3xb6.jpg?1)

Top of Piers Gill, corridor route

 (http://i.imgur.com/0MPJaPM.jpg?1)

Scafell. The entrance to Lords Rake is up the fan of scree in the middle right of picture. The rake is tucked away behind the rock running off to the right of the scree fan

(http://i.imgur.com/3dlHTDA.jpg?1)

Two shots of the chockstone, from either side

(http://i.imgur.com/fwGZx1M.jpg?1)
 
(http://i.imgur.com/k6jfDza.jpg?1)

Zoom shot of the top of Scafell pike

(http://i.imgur.com/oGl01L8.jpg?1)

Shot back up to Mickldore from the path down to the Great Moss

(http://i.imgur.com/oZa1SIu.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Monday 26 January 2015, 02:33:01 PM
These photos are all really inspirational like, it's making me want to do it too. Some amazing photos here.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Monday 26 January 2015, 02:56:48 PM
Would love to do a walk with OpenC
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Monday 26 January 2015, 03:01:01 PM
Would love to do a walk with OpenC

Same. :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Monday 26 January 2015, 03:11:45 PM
Open C , N-O official mountain guide.

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 26 January 2015, 05:54:04 PM
:aww:

:lol: I would be puffing and blowing in about five minutes, slowing you all down.  And then you'd roll your eyes at me stopping every two minutes for pictures, only about four of which will be any good :)

But yeah, there are some amazing places to go in this country, there really are.. and they're really not the exclusive preserve of people who've been doing it for ages.  You just have to make sure you know what you're doing by building up a bit at a time.  Maybe when the weather improves I'll have an open (c) invite for a smaller Cheviot loop, or somewhere in the lakes :)

The first time this thread gets somebody out onto the hills who hasn't done it before, I'll be properly :single_tear_of_joy: :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 26 January 2015, 06:00:44 PM
(http://s7.postimg.org/75f1ytk8b/pen_y_fan.jpg)

Was staying in a cottage in Brecon this weekend. Went up Pen-Y-Fan, really good dramatic walk and decent views all the way up. We had planned to do a loop of the summits but we got up a little late and I didn't fancy dragging my girlfriend around in the failing light.  Picture isn't very good quality sadly as I only had my phone on me and I couldn't actually see the screen.

:thup:  I enjoyed Pen-Y-Fan a lot and hadn't expected to, which is always nice.  I did the whole horseshoe walk around the reservoir, four summits in all, but Pen-Y-Fan is definitely the highlight so you didn't miss out on anything significant.  Were there any of those wild horses there..?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Monday 26 January 2015, 09:23:03 PM
Thanks for that man, that's good to know. No wild horses. A lot of people though, a lot of 'pro walkers' middle aged people with expensive kit. Some people tried to tell us not to go up about a third of the way up because it was 'quite treacherous up there' that was a bit annoying as it was really fine. Just a bit prontonising as a young man in good health.

Would you recommend Snowdon?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 27 January 2015, 05:13:16 AM
I would recommend Snowdon if you're near it.  It's a pain in the arse to get to the top and find it overrun by people who have gone up on the train.  If I was closer to other mountain areas, I personally would go to those instead :)  My own personal walking areas preference runs Anywhere In Scotland -> Cheviots -> Lakes -> Wales -> Everywhere Else.

Most people who have spent any time on the hills make a pact with themselves to just tell people straight what conditions are like higher up and let them make their own mind up because they've been involved in an incident, or they find out somebody's got into trouble that day and they feel they could have warned them.  Has happened to me on Ben Nevis, documented somewhere in this very thread (http://www.newcastle-online.org/nufcforum/index.php/topic,76976.msg4550238/topicseen.html#msg4550238).  Warnings like that are usually about conditions rather than state of health.  Received wisdom is that unless you're prepared for winter conditions, you should keep off the higher hills when they're snow-covered, because icy snow is indeed very dangerous when there are long and exposed slopes (as there are on one side of Pen-Y-Fan); if I'd been to the top of an icy 900 metre mountain and saw you going up without ice axes and crampons, I would probably have told you similar :blush: 

Most people can recognise for themselves when things are getting too sketchy, but what some people don't realise is that it's harder to go down frozen snow than it is to go up it.  You need to be able to do what happens about 10 seconds into this, or on steeper ground you can end up sliding a long, long way.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNmRqwsggws (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNmRqwsggws)

It's all about the delivery of the message, of course; I would have just told you that you needed to be really careful if you were going any higher up if the ice was hard and anywhere near long or steep slopes.  No need to be all Safetyman about it.  I was up a very popular Scottish mountain with a friend of mine a couple of years ago, a friend who hadn't been on that mountain before.  He was rightly pleased with himself for making it, but spent the whole journey back down essentially telling people that they'd started too late and weren't going to make it :lol:  There could have been a crack team of Himalayan specialists up there and he'd have told them the same.  "I managed it, but there's no way you will".  People get themselves a bit too excited sometimes :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Tuesday 27 January 2015, 10:08:10 AM
:thup:

That's fair enough, my beef I think was more down to his tone and the fact that conditions were really ok. There was some patchy snow but always grass available, right up to the top, some guy went up with two 6 year olds :lol:  I think I just get a bit radge when people say things, like im incapable of taking a view about when something isn't safe.

I am really eager to go up to Scotland at some point. Probably the Summer.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 27 January 2015, 05:14:01 PM
Well, if you could walk on grass to the top then he was being a fanny, aye :lol:

Scotland is..

..well, you know my thoughts on Scotland :)  There is nowhere like it.  Amazing walking country.  Diminishes the experience anywhere else in the UK once you've been there (unless you're the type who likes to roll off the hill into a little country pub; tourist infrastructure is not really their thing, and a lot of the time the hill you roll off is 30 miles from the nearest house :lol:).  Ben Nevis is eminently possible for anybody who's reasonably fit and prepared to take their time with it - certainly doable if you can do Pen-Y-Fan, although the ascent is probably almost twice as much* - and although a lot of experienced walkers decry the "tourist route", I don't; the top is an amazing place, however you get there, and the tourist route is a wonderful way to make it a much safer mountain.  Just don't go expecting a view, and treat it as a bonus if you get one.  Definitely wait until August when most of the snow will be gone, though :)


* if you went from the Storey Arms, it's actually more than three times the ascent
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Tuesday 27 January 2015, 09:05:14 PM
Assynt.  :notbad:

Suilven is the craziest looking mountain I've ever seen, the way it just appears there and looms over everything is incredible. Not a chance of attempting it due to the weather but will have a crack at it in the summer. It's completely magical to look at, I think I have become a bit obsessed with it. Did manage to do a walk to the bone caves which was good fun, had to shelter from a snow storm while we were up there. Must have been 100mph winds again the other night and we were staying above a beach completely out in the open, was quite an experience. These wee 'glamping' pods are amazing, was nice and warm in bed with all that going on around us. Will definitely go back in the summer, when hopefully a restaurant in Lochinver will be open.  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Tuesday 27 January 2015, 10:13:28 PM
What are the midgies like high up in the scottish mountains OC? Camped at Glencoe once and the midgies were unbearable, we were forced from on our first spot in literally minutes. We gave up the wild camp and went to a site but even there the midgies were still bad.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 28 January 2015, 05:43:01 AM

Nice one colin :thup:  There's never a great deal open through the winter, though, you're right.. although actually, in Assynt there's not a great deal open in the summer either :lol:  Suilven is an amazing mountain :smitten:  That's what I like about that part of Scotland, they way they just rise up from sea level.  Canisp, Cul Mor and Cul Beag are nearby and similar.  My vote for Craziest Looking is Liathach, slightly further south in Torridon (simply because it's bigger and even more ferocious looking to my mind).

Pedro: it depends where you are.  I've seen midges on the top of Ben Macdui, more than 1300 metres up and the second highest mountain in Britain.  Usually, though, with a bit of height comes a bit of wind and that's enough to keep them away.  They don't bother me, tbh, but I know some people get frantic about them :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 29 January 2015, 03:26:06 PM
Just come back from a 10 mile trek in the snow on the trails and fields where I live. The weather was gorgeous. 1C with -5C wind chill. The snow was about eight inches in places which made for some tricky going but apart from that I felt great. The fitness is getting there now. Just need to hit some hills now!

Some shitty phone pics alert:

Spoiler
(http://oi57.tinypic.com/ehhv8z.jpg)

(http://oi58.tinypic.com/zxs4xs.jpg)

Bin Bag Alley  :lol:

(http://oi61.tinypic.com/rvdqmp.jpg)

(http://oi58.tinypic.com/23k93ef.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 29 January 2015, 06:27:54 PM

:thup: I need some days off for exactly that sort of thing :)  Looks like a great day for it.

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Thursday 29 January 2015, 08:01:04 PM
I absolutely love the snow, can't beat it.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 29 January 2015, 08:19:33 PM
:thup:  Same.  I like the way that snow makes even the smallest hills look like the Cairngorms in midwinter :aww:

I love it all the time, even when it makes the commute from darkest Northumberland a pain in the arse, but there's nothing in this world quite like making your way up a snow slope that nobody has been on before, particularly when you use an ice axe to invent the route as you go.  Amazing feeling :)

One of the best, but hardest, days I ever had was on a modest hill called Windy Gyle in the Cheviots, an eight mile loop in deep, powdery snow which meant that every step above a certain altitude - most of the walk - needed me to lift my knees out of the snow so I could move forward, raising thighs to almost horizontal every time.  I had to sit for about an hour in the car before I could make my legs work enough to drive again.  Amazing experience.  I did a similar walk to the same summit a couple of years back in frozen snow which was also difficult but I wasn't falling through the snow so I could crampon and axe it.  Alone on a snowy mountain is, I think, when I'm at my happiest.   Although don't tell my lass that; she's great as well, just in a different way :lol:

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Jill on Thursday 29 January 2015, 08:32:34 PM
Just come back from a 10 mile trek in the snow on the trails and fields where I live. The weather was gorgeous. 1C with -5C wind chill.

Sounds like a cracking way to spend a few hours.

I walked home from work alongside roads on snow that had either disappeared or turned to black ice. :okay:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 29 January 2015, 10:44:09 PM

:thup: I need some days off for exactly that sort of thing :)  Looks like a great day for it.

I've got no hills near me but I've got plenty of off road tracks and a nature reserve 5 mins from my back door. Can do some quite long walks with very minimal road walking. My insole on one of my boots kept moving and aggravating my foot but other than that it was a class day. Had two lengthy coffee and cookie breaks :D was out the house about 3 and a half hours in total.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 29 January 2015, 10:47:18 PM
Just come back from a 10 mile trek in the snow on the trails and fields where I live. The weather was gorgeous. 1C with -5C wind chill.

Sounds like a cracking way to spend a few hours.

I walked home from work alongside roads on snow that had either disappeared or turned to black ice. :okay:

It was indeed a cracking way to spend a few hours! There is nothing worse than getting soaked off lorries and buses in the slush though. Kind of dampens the mood a little.  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 30 January 2015, 12:49:23 PM
Pedro good way to spend a few hours, here's a way to spend a few more!!

http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=49096.

Here's some bigger pics for this site.

(http://i.imgur.com/imk22G8.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/usPUEVB.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/uWaupUK.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 30 January 2015, 05:51:49 PM
Hedgehope from Hartside..?  That was the hill that got me into the mountains properly, although I failed from that side due to snow.  Climbed it from Langleeford (unbelievably steep and tiring) a couple of weeks later, loved it, never looked back :)  That's the hill I've climbed most often, probably been up there 30 or 40 times in the last six or seven years.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 31 January 2015, 11:01:19 AM
Yeah I've climbed it from Langleeford once, and it is steep. For some reason that day the angle until it levelled out at the crags gave me a bad back that day.

I would say it is my favourite Cheviot Hill. I.ve climbed it numerous times, probably into double figures but nowhere near 40!

There's more pics on the Walkhighlands link, I'm on as Guinessman on there.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 31 January 2015, 11:44:07 AM
Anybody ever go through there old polaroid photographs? or anybody still using film?

Been using digital for about 10 years and the old polaroid's have been in a cupboard since then

Went through mine other day which are understandably mountains mainly Scottish's ones.

thought I would share a few here.

Mustached shot from the early 90,s.The mountain behind is Ben starav, a big brute of a hill in glen etive rising very steeply straight from sea level. The quality has gone from the shot

(http://i.imgur.com/ol8zTkc.jpg?1)

Backpacking in the Lairig Ghru late 90,s. wish I could get back to that level of fitness

(http://i.imgur.com/7tgH0xy.jpg?1)

Shot of the scramble down from the A,Chir ridge on Arran. Did this in 1999 but its well beyond my capabilities now. The shot is actually looking back on the ridge. the path comes down off the high point to more or less where the moss is. It then drops down the face for about 20 feet on excellent handholds down to a sloping shelf where there was a sling left in place to assist and then drops into the col before climbing back up to where the photograph was taken from. The actual climb down is over a 400 foot drop into the corrie below. The first time I tried it I got to the top where the moss is and couldn't figure it out and had to retreat down a chimmey. went back the next day and cracked it. Its a grade 5 scramble the hardest there is.   

(http://i.imgur.com/wqdEq33.jpg?1)

Shot of Cir Mhor on Arran. The island is well worth a vist

(http://i.imgur.com/fDlZxEZ.jpg?1)

Liathach in Torridon taken from Beinn Eighe

(http://i.imgur.com/AY5pc5J.jpg?1)

The triple buttress in coire Mhic Fhearchair Beinn Eighe Torridon. Easy to get to, walk from the car park opposite the ling hut in the glen and walk into Coire Dubh on a rising path over the moor. The path curves around sail Mhor, an outlier of Beinn Eighe and into the coirre. Easy walk about 4 miles for a crap day. The actual summit of Beinn eighe is not that much further 

(http://i.imgur.com/qQgjOQM.jpg?1)

Another shot on Arran. The hill to the right foreground is the top of the A,Chir ridge, Cir Mhor to the left.

(http://i.imgur.com/cnZmdSs.jpg?1)

For Colin two shots of Suilven taken from Canisp

(http://i.imgur.com/wXvJXZc.jpg?1)
(http://i.imgur.com/lwnE0xN.jpg?1)

At the time I thought this was the best photograph I had taken. Its an autumn shot of Loch Leven taken on the moorland path on  the back of Na Gruagaichean in the Mamores

(http://i.imgur.com/kOsYCtA.jpg?1)

Wildcamp outside Sourlies bothy in Knoydart. The land in the background is the Isle Of Skye. Its a special place only reachable by boat or on foot hence the attraction. The photo was taken in September around 1997 I think.

(http://i.imgur.com/d6fueUR.jpg?1)

There's many happy memories and hopefully many more to come.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Saturday 31 January 2015, 12:44:09 PM
Great pics Snoop. Different seeing Suilven from that angle. Definitely doing it in the summer.

Just told my mum we were in Assynt and apparently she used to go on holiday every year for a few years almost exactly where we were, above Clachtoll beach. Had no idea. Also they can apparently see Suilven from the kitchen window of the house on Lewis! I must have been seeing it all that time... :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 31 January 2015, 12:58:38 PM
Yeah, more great shots :thup:  I love that view of Liathach from Beinn Eighe, amazing :)  Been up on that part of the Beinn Eighe ridge twice now, and have never seen a damn thing from it.  I guess you know that feeling better than I do :lol:

You got any shots of the Witch's Step on Arran..?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 31 January 2015, 01:36:53 PM
Colin

I,ve never done it either, will give a crack sometime, probably on a walk through and use the bothy.

Open c I don't think I have a shot of the witches step. I've tried it once but didn't do it . I got the first section done  but the next step/ stretch was about 8  foot over a smooth outward sloping slab which I didn't fancy and if you do it your committed and looking at it I wouldn't fancy having to reverse the move. I ended up going for the bypass path instead which drops you into the corrie by about 50 feet.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 31 January 2015, 02:09:01 PM
It looks horrific, particularly that smooth outward sloping bit you mention.  Amazing that in this day and age it's difficult to find a picture of it on google images, says a lot about how relatively little the mountains which aren't munros are visited.  There's a great picture of three people downclimbing it in a Ralph Storer book, but I've never seen a similar one on the internet.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 31 January 2015, 02:44:38 PM
Not for the faint hearted!!


http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=29182

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 1 February 2015, 06:50:13 PM
with all the talk of recently of Blencathra, please take note of the following,

http://www.ukhillwalking.com/forums/t.php?n=608237

and

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-31081211
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 1 February 2015, 07:06:12 PM

The North side of Liathach under snow; can't conceive of ever wanting to climb there even when it's dry to be honest.  First time I've heard of a climbing fatality in the Torridon area, although I'm sure they have their share.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 1 February 2015, 07:52:05 PM
Cheers snoopdawg, don't worry though mate I am going to wait till the snows gone to climb Blencathra. I promise.  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 2 February 2015, 02:05:54 PM
Fairly useful link regarding Lakes weather and road conditions. Hartside looks good.

 http://www.cumbriacc.gov.uk/roads-transport/WeatherStations/A592KirkstonePass.asp
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 8 February 2015, 11:45:27 AM
Sign this petition if you have a few minutes spare http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/65627 and help put an end to sick b******s killing for fun.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 February 2015, 04:16:16 PM

Done :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 February 2015, 04:29:12 PM
Just back from a circuit of Cheviot, Comb Fell and Hedgehope which form a high horseshoe around the Harthope Valley and the farm of Langleeford.  Usually takes me about five hours; took over seven today.  Cheviot (my original target, I was planning to just turn around) was frozen solid and as such, was a delight since it's usually a boggy hell-hole.  That went so well, I decided to finish the circuit since Comb Fell is absolutely penitential in all but the very driest or coldest conditions (peat holes 15 feet deep that have to be climbed into and out of, a maze of deep bogs on the top linking to Hedgehope).  Alas, I was expecting to be able to crampon across it with joyful abandon but it was not to be; not only were the peat hags still there and unfilled, not only was the maze of bogs still present and correct, I also had to contend with very thick and very slippery ice around said peat bogs (not a great combination) and deep, deep snow which gave way under my weight every six or seven steps and plunged me thigh-deep into snow, or sometimes snow and bog.  Character building :)  Hedgehope was also hard work; very steep frozen grass all the way down.  Amazing how much extra time it took just because of the difficult conditions.  There was a party of schoolkids out on the hill as well, who hadn't made it back to their bus when I got back despite heading back the short way down the valley.  I told the leaders (in the way that SGTF doesn't like :lol:) that I thought it'd be sketchy down there, which it almost certainly would have been - the path is exposed and wet even in good condtions - and hoped they'd get the hint and just turn around after Cheviot and go back the way they came up; I hope they're alright. They weren't back to their buses by the time I had finished, although I saw them dropping off Cheviot just ten or fifteen minutes after I did.

A wonderful circuit, one of the best long walks you can do in Northumberland, and I'd recommend it to anybody who's fit enough for it (around 17km and about 1,000m climbing, so a big day even by Lakes and Scottish standards), but only in good conditions :)  Pictures to follow, after a couple of beers in the bath.  A couple already up on instagram (http://www.instagram.com/open_cs), which I use to document most places I go :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Sunday 8 February 2015, 05:26:15 PM
 :lol:

Why I oughta
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 February 2015, 05:29:01 PM
:lol: Sorry :)  Schoolkids in hoodies and snowy mountains with a windchill temperature of probably -15 or so don't necessarily mix in my view, in those circumstances I will always give well-intentioned advice without preaching :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Sunday 8 February 2015, 05:31:26 PM
You were obviously bang on point. Gratuitous reference though. Looking forward to seeing the pictures.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 February 2015, 06:10:25 PM
Nothing too majestic I'm afraid, I'm without any of my usual image editing software until the new PC arrives :)  I had a couple of panoramas that I can't process yet :anguish:  I'm sure these will convey the impression OK though..

Looking back to the carpark (out of view to the left) from the start of the ascent.  Housey Crag, the prominent rock to the right on the skyline, is about six and a half hours away and is the point where you finally drop off the ridge :anguish:
(http://i.imgur.com/jlHwy40.jpg)

The ascent to Cheviot from Scald Hill, about an hour in.  The bog here is frozen solid, but is usually lethal and has been known to claim boots (and probably dogs).  A really grim bit of the walk in usual conditions which requires multiple deviations from the path to find places where you can safely jump over the mire.
(http://i.imgur.com/HXYgDSg.jpg)

The view from Cheviot across the col between Hedgehope and Comb Fell toward the West and Simonside on the horizon.  Always looks good, looked amazing today.
(http://i.imgur.com/bucHQwp.jpg)

Windswept Lola at Cheviot summit cairn.  The frost on the trig point indicates fairly clearly which side doesn't get the sun, and which way the prevailing wind blows :)
(http://i.imgur.com/xoBnALU.jpg)

The path across Cheviot summit plateau.  This part of the walk is also notoriously filthy; those slabs routinely just sink into the peat on the summit and have to be replaced.  There are a couple of bits on the path which would normally require a jump to get over a bubbling, oozing peat bog.  Today, everything was frozen solid and just delightful.
(http://i.imgur.com/0yiuMTX.jpg)

The Pennine Way signpost at Cairn Hill.  Visibility was, as you can see, amazing.  There's a tremendous view into Scotland from here but a camera doesn't do it justice, it's too wide.  Go and see for yourself :)  The best way to this point is to buy a pass to drive up the College Valley and climb Cheviot from the North, by the Mountain Rescue hut at Red Cribs.
(http://i.imgur.com/reeQfzR.jpg)

Cheviot Wilderness #1: Windy Gyle from the descent from Cheviot.  Some of the most remote territory in Northumberland.
(http://i.imgur.com/ukFJGV9.jpg)

Cheviot Wilderness #2: The Southern Cheviot hills, with Simonside on the skyline above them.  This is looking toward the upper reaches of the Ingram/Breamish valley, if anybody knows it (and I'm sure some of you do).  The valley you can see dropping away to the left would eventually run around to Linhope Spout.  At least, I'm pretty sure it would :lol:
(http://i.imgur.com/cxKPTx1.jpg)

Attempt to make the crossing of Comb Fell more pleasant.  I hope it works out, because it's a f***ing nightmare 99% of the time at the minute :)  There's a sign saying keep off until the undergrowth comes through.  The terrain was so purgatorial I tried it anyway, but I just kept slipping on it.  I'll wait for the undergrowth :)
(http://i.imgur.com/upblrN3.jpg)

The final ascent of Hedgehope from Comb Fell, about five hours in.  I was seriously considering bailing out down to the valley where the schoolkids were headed (on the left) at this point, I was so tired after crossing Comb Fell.  The ascent is only 150m or so, though, and although it's hard work at the end of a long day, it's not quite as bad as it looks :)
(http://i.imgur.com/IJHBZT9.jpg)

Hedgehope summit cairn, all hard climbing over :)  This is one of my favourite places, the summit that got me into hillwalking properly.  The view isn't an amazing one, but there's something about the place.  Snoopdawg obviously agrees.
(http://i.imgur.com/H32mJf2.jpg)

Long Crags on the way back down.  There's a wide moor to cross at around 400 metres altitude after the descent from Hedgehope but before dropping off the ridge.  More then once I have heard mysterious sounds of things walking with me while crossing this moor, and my dogs have barked at things which aren't there.  The OS map indicates that there used to be a settlement up here.  Strange :)
(http://i.imgur.com/V7CLvxs.jpg)

Housey Crag, on the way back down.  Nearly finished at this stage.  This is the rock outcrop that was in the first picture.  The Cheviots' premier rock climbing location; there are a few strange rocky outcrops on Hedgehope's eastern ridge.  Presumably ancient lava flows or something.  If the Cheviots had more of them, the hills would probably be at least as popular as the Peak District, although there's still not the sort of mountain form you find in the Lakes.  You have to know where to look for them this far North in England :)
(http://i.imgur.com/rbHaukC.jpg)

Just above the car park :)  I was, at this stage, absolutely f***ed :lol:
(http://i.imgur.com/nUcq6Pd.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Sunday 8 February 2015, 06:48:38 PM
Got yourself a new Instagram follower!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 February 2015, 06:56:06 PM

:)  Cheers, and I will return the favour.. as long as you're not just using it to screenshot Pokemons, like the bairn does :lol:

I love instagram, perfect for stuff like this.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 February 2015, 08:30:20 PM
Your Instagram is exactly how Instagram should be :)

Mick: I didn't get the email to complete that petition. Did you..?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Sunday 8 February 2015, 08:38:56 PM
Mine? Ah cheers, I like taking iPhone photos out and about, the new one has a great camera.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 February 2015, 08:41:19 PM
Aye, I love Instagram when it's essentially a travelogue :) alas my xperia doesn't have a great camera, but I love using it all the same :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 8 February 2015, 10:19:27 PM
Your Instagram is exactly how Instagram should be :)

Mick: I didn't get the email to complete that petition. Did you..?

It takes a while. I signed this morning and received the e-mail this evening.  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 9 February 2015, 10:36:56 AM
Ridiculous photos open c, f***ing mega. Got chills about the ghost bit f***ing hell I'd be bricking it.  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 9 February 2015, 12:14:50 PM

It's a strange place.  Three or four times when I've been crossing it, I've heard footsteps around me that aren't quite keeping pace with mine.. and since that part is early in the ascent of Hedgehope from Langleeford, it's not always when I'm absolutely exhausted :lol:  One of my three dogs has gone absolutely mental, barking at nothing at all, twice there.  She's not a barky dog at the best of times.  Always puts me in mind of the legend of the Big Grey Man of Ben Macdui in the Cairngorms.  When I noticed the ancient settlement on the map, I got properly goosebumpy :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 9 February 2015, 05:09:40 PM
Wow what a beautiful day today it felt like spring. Glorious sunshine, 10C and barely a breath of wind. Decided to hit some new trails that I'd never been on near where I live with the mutt and ended up doing a 16k round trip. I was stripping off layers 20 mins into the walk; no hat and gloves required in February! There was still patches of snow around which were a welcome break from the sloppy mud which I had to endure for the most part but it turned out to be my best walk yet. I went through two nature reserves which were brilliant and only got lost once when I lost the the trail and ended up stuck in a farmers field with 5 horses galloping toward me in a slightly worrying manner, I was bricking it! :lol:

I need to start preparing better for these hikes as I was bloody famished by the end, a flask of coffee and a snickers just ain't gonna cut it anymore, I need proper sustenance!.

I'm just sitting here cabbaged on the settee now trying to work up the energy to bath the dog.. :scared:

I'm starting to get hooked on this walking lark like.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 9 February 2015, 10:12:28 PM
It's properly good for the soul to get out and walk in the middle of nowhere for hours and hours: particularly to do it by yourself, can be amazing.  16km is good going, if you can do that you're ready for the hills and mountains :)  But aye, you need to be well provisioned.  I just took some grim Ginsters thing and a big bar of chocolate yesterday and I was feeling faint with hunger by the time I got back (good excuse to go into Wooler and buy emergency food and beer, of course).

Have you tried any map reading while you're out..?  You can do it anywhere, and it's good practice.  Becomes something of an essential skill the further up and out you go, so you might as well start thinking about it :thup:  You can often pick up second hand OS maps on Amazon for not very much.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: r0cafella on Monday 9 February 2015, 10:20:56 PM
Surprised you lot don't hate instagram given it down scales images and is a wash with crappy filters
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 9 February 2015, 10:23:57 PM
But quick and easy. Which counts for a lot :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Monday 9 February 2015, 11:16:45 PM
Your Instagram is exactly how Instagram should be :)

Mick: I didn't get the email to complete that petition. Did you..?

Did you get your e-mail?

On another note, I found out today that Grouse Moors are paid £56 per hectare from our taxes, it's ironic that they get so much at a time when the Army are being cut to the bone.

Another reason to close them down.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 10 February 2015, 05:37:18 AM

Aye, done :thup:  It had gone into the junk folder but sorted now.

The only arguments I ever have in my entire life are with shotgun toting knackers who try to tell me where I can and can't go when I'm on the hill.  Would love to see a return to a regular ecosystem.  There's an argument that in Scotland there are now so many deer that some amount of culling will have to continue for the sake of the plant life on the moors.  Any opinions on that?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Tuesday 10 February 2015, 06:54:41 PM

Aye, done :thup:  It had gone into the junk folder but sorted now.

The only arguments I ever have in my entire life are with shotgun toting knackers who try to tell me where I can and can't go when I'm on the hill.  Would love to see a return to a regular ecosystem.  There's an argument that in Scotland there are now so many deer that some amount of culling will have to continue for the sake of the plant life on the moors.  Any opinions on that?

We only have to cull deer because we killed off the animals which controlled them.  I agree with keeping the numbers down, letting them get out of hand will cause even bigger problems.  I've always been pro hunting, I eat meat so why shouldn't somebody kill for food. It's just when you look further into it that it starts to look dodgy.

It costs almost £200 to produce a gun licence, we only charge £50 to buy one so we are all paying for it if we pay taxes, the price has not changed since 2001.  Landowners are some of the richest people in this country and we're subsidising them while pensioners are counting every penny.  Grouse moors are currently subsidised £30 per hectare, Cameron is going to raise that to £56 and it's sickening.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Tuesday 10 February 2015, 06:57:51 PM
Here's a good and shocking read. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/apr/28/britain-plutocrats-landed-gentry-shotgun-owners?CMP=share_btn_tw
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Tuesday 10 February 2015, 08:02:21 PM
It's properly good for the soul to get out and walk in the middle of nowhere for hours and hours: particularly to do it by yourself, can be amazing.  16km is good going, if you can do that you're ready for the hills and mountains :)  But aye, you need to be well provisioned.  I just took some grim Ginsters thing and a big bar of chocolate yesterday and I was feeling faint with hunger by the time I got back (good excuse to go into Wooler and buy emergency food and beer, of course).

Have you tried any map reading while you're out..?  You can do it anywhere, and it's good practice.  Becomes something of an essential skill the further up and out you go, so you might as well start thinking about it :thup:  You can often pick up second hand OS maps on Amazon for not very much.

Nah not tried any map reading yet and to be honest I'd have gotten properly lost at one point yesterday if it wasn't for google maps which shows the arrow in the direction you are facing! I've got two OS maps but not for my area so I need to invest in one sharpish.

Think I'm gonna start taking a proper packed lunch out with me in future.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Tuesday 10 February 2015, 08:15:13 PM
Just had a look at OS maps for my area. My village is situated right on the boundary of two different maps. :yao:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 10 February 2015, 08:26:09 PM
:lol:  always the way.  Was that the 1:50,000 or the 1:25,000..?  1:50,000 is usually enough for all but complicated mountain ridges with dangerous cliffs, in my experience.  I started out buying exclusively 1:25k because it was more hardcore and detailed, but quickly realised that the 1:50k is often a better choice.  And they're cheaper (and, of course, you don't need to carry so many of them).
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Tuesday 10 February 2015, 08:57:35 PM
I'm on the boundary of two different explorer and two different landranger maps. Literally right at the top/bottom of each.  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 10 February 2015, 09:24:23 PM
:lol: the OS have a way of making you feel like you're paying for more than you should be :)

Pick the most interesting direction and buy that one :) and a cheap compass as well.  Navigation is more entertaining than you might think, and a good thing to be able to do :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Tuesday 10 February 2015, 10:01:28 PM
Think I might just go on one of them free online OS map sites and print an A4 page off.  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Wednesday 11 February 2015, 12:17:01 AM
Think I might just go on one of them free online OS map sites and print an A4 page off.  :lol:

You can use bing maps http://www.bing.com/maps  on your phone and towards the top left it has a drop down list which you can select "Ordnance Survey Map" and can zoom in for more detail.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 11 February 2015, 08:22:36 AM
Think I might just go on one of them free online OS map sites and print an A4 page off.  :lol:

You can use bing maps http://www.bing.com/maps  on your phone and towards the top left it has a drop down list which you can select "Ordnance Survey Map" and can zoom in for more detail.

Sounds like a plan mate cheers.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 11 February 2015, 01:11:05 PM
Open C apologies for the lateness but it looks like you had a stunning day, quite typical of how the Cheviots can be In winter. Great pictures, I can almost feel the rawness of the air. I agree with you about Hedgehope its a special place. I think its must be that it has the feel of a proper hill, you almost always have the place to yourself and despite feeling remote its virtually on the doorstep.

myself I've been in sunnier climes for a week and would seem to have missed some great walking days, nearest I got to a walk was a cliff top path of about 500 feet climb above Los Cristianos in Tenerife.

captured a photograph on top of the cliff which I thought resembled king Harold though I don't know if he ever went there!

(http://i.imgur.com/ZhEp3pB.jpg?1)   
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 February 2015, 06:42:01 PM
I don't know, maybe that sort of thing is sometimes a better choice than a snowy Cheviot :)

A couple of panoramas which I can now do since I've got photoshop back (just quick and dirty efforts, no artistic merit here).  All the high level parts of the walk are in these pictures.

From Scald Hill on the way up to Cheviot.  Hedgehope to the left, Comb Fell in the middle, Cheviot and Scald Hill to the right.  All still to do at this point, and by this time you're starting to feel the grade of the ascent because it's fairly steep right from the start.
(http://i.imgur.com/CP8PgEF.jpg)

From Scotsman's Knowe, midway between Cheviot and Comb Fell and the halfway point.  You can bail out here and head straight down the valley back to the car park although it's still a long and rough path, about an hour and a half or two hours from here.  Cheviot left, Comb Fell and a distant Hedgehope right.
(http://i.imgur.com/MeLn6fH.jpg)

From just below Hedgehope summit, looking back over how much has already been done.  Comb Fell left, Cheviot right.
(http://i.imgur.com/l0YFt1b.jpg)

As usual, it looks disappointingly easy when you see the pictures :lol:  In reality, the three hills involved are quite big, honestly :lol: :blush:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 February 2015, 06:52:37 PM
And finally, since I've got Memory Map back as well, and just in case anyone fancies it:

(http://i.imgur.com/pDuR2N2.jpg)

:)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 12 February 2015, 10:41:02 AM
OC mate if I lived close to the Cheviots I'd have a crack at that tomorrow! Great map, i need all the help I can get! :lol:

After some advice if anyone can help. What's the best product to keep my boots water proofed? My boots have took a bit of a hammering lately what with the snow and mud so I think it'd be wise to give them a service.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 12 February 2015, 05:57:24 PM

I never do mine, but probably should.  The only boots I've got these days are big winter Scarpa Mantas, though, which will be waterproof until the day they finally fall apart :)  As long as you keep them clean, that's a good start.. with fabric boots, usually the reason for waterproofing going is that the seams are starting to come apart, which there isn't a whole lot you can do about.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 12 February 2015, 06:27:42 PM
I have some cheap 27 quid Karrimor ones.  :lol:

Been excellent so far for the 50 or so mile ive done in them but I imagine they will start falling apart and gushing in water pretty soon if I don't treat them.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 12 February 2015, 07:33:43 PM

Are they leather or fabric..?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Thursday 12 February 2015, 08:45:21 PM
I have some cheap 27 quid Karrimor ones.  :lol:

Been excellent so far for the 50 or so mile ive done in them but I imagine they will start falling apart and gushing in water pretty soon if I don't treat them.

Try Scotchgard.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Punch-Instant-Protector-Spray-200ml/dp/B005VONNJ0/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1423773862&sr=8-6&keywords=scotchgard
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Friday 13 February 2015, 12:00:34 AM
(http://i.imgur.com/QTFnlGT.jpg)

I plan on using this thread much more now that I live in Denver.

This was a quick hike today, really just to scope out the park. It's about 20 minutes from my house so it'll be getting a lot of use. There's a cool old fire tower and some ruins of the "summer White House" which look interesting.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Friday 13 February 2015, 12:09:35 AM
I have some cheap 27 quid Karrimor ones.  :lol:

Been excellent so far for the 50 or so mile ive done in them but I imagine they will start falling apart and gushing in water pretty soon if I don't treat them.

Try Scotchgard.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Punch-Instant-Protector-Spray-200ml/dp/B005VONNJ0/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1423773862&sr=8-6&keywords=scotchgard

Cheers Mick I'll order that.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 13 February 2015, 05:42:19 AM

Looking forward to seeing more stuff from the other side of the Atlantic cuba :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Friday 13 February 2015, 10:15:27 AM
This thread has basically made me want to move back to the north. Not much dramatic scenery down here.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 13 February 2015, 12:06:27 PM
For those days when you cant get out, available on the BBC iplayer at the minute

Tir is Teanga on Alba- walking in Glen Etive.

The mountain BBC Scotland , 6 part programme's on aviemore and the skiing industry.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Friday 13 February 2015, 05:06:26 PM

Looking forward to seeing more stuff from the other side of the Atlantic cuba :thup:

My goal is to summit a 14er by the end of the year.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 13 February 2015, 06:00:58 PM
This thread has basically made me want to move back to the north. Not much dramatic scenery down here.

There's not, but it makes you appreciate it all the more when you come back :)  I always think, when I hear about people walking/biking/whatever from John O'Groats to Land's End, how f***ing dull it must be once you're past around Derbyshire (and tbh a fair bit of what comes between Derbyshire and Northumberland as well).

My goal is to summit a 14er by the end of the year.

Nice :)  Are they all multi-day trips, or are there some of them which have high starting points and can be done in a day hike..?  The best I can hope for in this country is to summit a four-and-a-half-thousander, although it starts from sea level so it's still a reasonable climb for a day :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Friday 13 February 2015, 06:26:35 PM
They vary quite a bit. Due to the nature of the Rockies you'll never be starting at sea level (Denver for instance is already at 5000ft above sea level). But some of the hikes can be 5000+ft elevation gain on 12 mile hikes or there are some six/seven mile hikes where you only gain about 2800ft or so. Most of the trail heads are already around 9-10,000ft so you can only really gain 4000 or so feet, the mileage depends on the terrain.

I found this list which I'm going to use as my guide: http://www.14ers.com/routes_2.php

The "easiest" one is 9 miles and 4700ft elevation gain, so it'll definitely take some working up to, especially with the already high elevation and lack of oxygen.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 13 February 2015, 06:29:16 PM

Yeah, that's pretty much Ben Nevis size walk.  Sounds great.  5,000 feet and 12 miles is my sort of day.  But, of course, we don't have to worry so much about the whole oxygen thing :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 15 February 2015, 08:27:19 PM
Over the lakes today. Briefly, parked up at Gatesgarth Buttermere, over Scarth gap, down into Ennerdale, up to looking Stead, along to Pillar mountain, across to Steeple, down to Ennerdale and back over Scarth gap to Gatesgarth.

Not long been in here's a couple of photographs to show the day, will put more on and a better report when I get sorted.

View from Pillar summit towards the Scafells

(http://i.imgur.com/wqzYws8.jpg?1)

View back to Pillar from the path to steeple.

(http://i.imgur.com/sZt3rPq.jpg?1) 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Sunday 15 February 2015, 08:36:51 PM
I'm at Ambleside next weekend actually.

Never been before, so any recommendations? :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 15 February 2015, 08:43:48 PM
recommendations for hills or beers??
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 15 February 2015, 08:50:38 PM
Looks great snoopdawg :thup:  That's a big day for winter, must be close to 1,500m ascent and 18-20km distance?  I wouldn't have tackled that until the days got a bit longer than they are now :)  Surprised the day was so good, I had been toying with heading over there myself but I'm going up to Scotland tomorrow instead.. not that the forecast is any good, but never mind :lol:

Tooj: if there's still snow on the high hills, then you're best off avoiding them.  A walk down Great Langdale is never a disappointment, start at either of the Dungeon Ghyll pubs and take the track on the right hand side of the valley (as you drive into it), the path that ultimately leads toward Scafell Pike.  Langdale Pikes on your right, Crinkle Crags and Bowfell on the left, lovely place.  Alternatively, you can head up to Stickle Tarn below Pavey Ark if the weather is good, the ground's not too icy, and you fancy a bit of a climb.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Sunday 15 February 2015, 08:54:13 PM
recommendations for hills or beers??
Both. :D

Cheers as always Open C.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 15 February 2015, 09:03:38 PM
Tooj, off the top of my head,

You could drive up to Langdale, its about 4 miles and there's plenty of expensive parking. There's hills all around. You could walk up to Stickle tarn, or an easy level 3 mile walk along Mickleden  . There's an easy path up to the three tarns giving you access to Bowfell. In addition the valley has two good pubs, the Old Dungeon Gyhll (ODG)  or the Stickle barn if you fancy a beer.

or drive over to Coniston, where you can drive up the Walna scar road which takes you to about 1200 feet, from there you can walk the rest of the pass or walk into Goatswater, this can give access to the Old man of Coniston,

or drive up Kirkstone pass to about 1600 feet and walk up the hill behind the kirkstone inn.

as I said off the top of my head. Be aware though, today was the first time for a month I've been over the lakes and because the snow has been stripped back its left the paths on top a bit skity
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 15 February 2015, 09:05:34 PM
open c apologies you were obviously typing as I was typing and uploading, great minds and all that!!

where in Scotland are you going?

the day today took 7 hrs 20 mins
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 15 February 2015, 09:10:43 PM
Not sure yet, the forecast looks decent for Perthshire and Cairngorms NP.  Might finally be the day to knock off Ben Chonzie, or I might head to Glenshee for Carn Tuirc and Cairn of Claise.  Or maybe Beinn a'Ghlo.  Or I might revisit Schiehallion or Geal Charn (Drumochter one).  Who knows :lol: that neck of the woods anyway :)

I'll have the dogs, though, so conditions will determine what I do. Don't want them balled up with snow and getting hypothermia, or starting an avalanche :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 15 February 2015, 09:14:38 PM


open c apologies you were obviously typing as I was typing and uploading, great minds and all that!!

Uncanny, but definitely the best walks in the area for people who don't necessarily want to go really high :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 15 February 2015, 09:21:25 PM
Enjoy but take care.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-31447156
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 15 February 2015, 09:28:44 PM
Aye, that's what's putting me off a bit.  Will see how it goes :)  If I have to drive eight hours and only walk for one before deciding that it's not safe, I still don't consider it a wasted day tbh.  I just like being up there :)

Or maybe it's time to get back over to the Lakes, it's been a long time :)  Axe and crampons worth taking, or is it all fairly clear by now..?  Looks reasonably benign from your pictures, even Gable and the Scafells.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 15 February 2015, 10:21:49 PM
To be honest I looked at the north facing slopes of the buttermere hills and left the ice axe and crampons in the car, foolish? I dont know but then again I knew the paths that I could take onto the tops I could easily reverse so felt safe. The paths on the tops are a bit strange, stripped of snow but on the north facing slopes the paths are very icy and slippy, the ice is that thin crampons and ice axe would be no good anyway. From the view that I got Scafell Pike looked to have a good covering and the snow coverage in the lakes in the minute seems to be heavier at the 3K mark.

If you are going Scotland Ben Chonzie from Glen turret is an "easy" winter day, I did it 2 yrs ago in the April and needed crampons to walk over the frozen snow, the angle is easy  almost like a Cheviot hill!and would be good for the dogs.

I know from looking at Chris Townsend website that there seems to be a big low level thaw so access wouldn't be a problem

Are you hostelling or just up for the day? If you're hostelling what do you with the dogs? I'm interested as I have the young snoopdawg!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 15 February 2015, 10:31:42 PM
Thank you :thup:

Most of my trips to Scotland are just day trips and Chonzie would be no different.. as long as the walk isn't an epic, I'm happy to drive up to about four hours each direction, which would get me to Crieff quite comfortably.  Probably going to leave it, though, the SAIS site shows increased risk of avalanche pretty much everywhere in Scotland and I don't want to lose a dog.

So will probably head for the lakes instead, just wait and see what looks inspirational when I get over there :) bloody pay car parks, though :anguish: verglas on the paths as well? Can be a right pain in the arse :)

The Torridon hostel takes dogs, I think, and the one at Glenmore.  That's about it, though, I think :anguish:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 16 February 2015, 11:05:31 AM
Trip report on walkhighlands.

http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=49469

Some shots for this forum, you can show then larger on here.

Buttermere from Scarth gap path

(http://i.imgur.com/gKe7xYM.jpg?1)

Path up towards Pillar

(http://i.imgur.com/w0clou8.jpg?1)

Pillar

(http://i.imgur.com/pAaoQbL.jpg?1)

Route down Long crag

 (http://i.imgur.com/7kgvx5N.jpg?1)

And from above

(http://i.imgur.com/IK9Chup.jpg?1)

Pillar rock from Ennerdale

(http://i.imgur.com/1mEIOkA.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Monday 16 February 2015, 11:08:10 AM
Brilliant picks again mate.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: TaylorJ_01 on Monday 16 February 2015, 11:11:30 AM
Getting me in the mood for a walking trip...
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 16 February 2015, 11:16:19 AM
Thanks for that.

Here's a shot of Pillar rock taken from Robinsons cairn on the High level traverse taken back in 2007. For anyone wanting to venture that way in better weather the path cuts up to the left of the photo point and then up the ramp that rises left to right and you then clamber up the slopes to the summit

(http://i.imgur.com/VNZfRhR.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 16 February 2015, 05:28:49 PM
You definitely got a better day than I did, great shots :)

I went up to Great Gable in the end.. well, 800 metres of it and then turned around when it became clear that it was getting darker, rather than brighter.. the view from Gable in heavy cloud is one I'm very familiar with and didn't feel the need to trudge through soft snow (with the dogs getting colder every minute) to reacquaint myself :lol:  Since the forecast was for improving conditions, I thought I'd go the Sty Head way since it keeps you at a low-ish level for a fair bit of the walk which would give the tops time to clear.  Normally, I'd go up Green Gable first via Sour Milk Ghyll.

The view from Seathwaite Farm up toward Grains Gill, which I think is the way snoopdawg went a couple of weeks back when he headed for Scafell Pike..?  The Glaramara/Allen Crags ridge in snow at the back, and Seathwaite Fell on the right.  Looked OK today, but I had changed my plans by this time and decided on Great Gable, so I was heading right rather than toward the snowy hills at the back here.
(http://i.imgur.com/vrHDtAL.jpg)

Stockley Bridge, where you have to decide.  Straight on toward Great End and Scafell Pike (or Esk Pike and Bowfell), or right up to Sty Head where you can get to the Scafells and Great Gable.
(http://i.imgur.com/ar2IoHt.jpg)

A snowy Glaramara from the entrance to Sty Head Pass
(http://i.imgur.com/oa7StGa.jpg)

The Scafells under cloud, coming into view along Sty Head Pass
(http://i.imgur.com/INRKmMS.jpg)

Great End, from Styhead Tarn
(http://i.imgur.com/bXhNOg3.jpg)

Great End and the Scafells, still under cloud, from the ascent of Great Gable
(http://i.imgur.com/qX5bjwi.jpg)

Back down to Styhead Tarn, from Great Gable
(http://i.imgur.com/bI2bgCL.jpg)

Lowering cloud at about 750 metres.  Great Gable is a kick in the arse off 900 metres; hillwalking and mountains take mental determination and if I'm honest, as soon as I saw this coming down I knew that my day was over :lol:
(http://i.imgur.com/jPCQNUq.jpg)

Obligatory dog shot.  Lola and Millie today.  Maisie is bone idle and I left her at home :)
(http://i.imgur.com/w28BjlG.jpg)

The exit from Sty Head Pass on the way back down
(http://i.imgur.com/D0aL6T2.jpg)

Borrowdale, from the descent back to Stockley Bridge
(http://i.imgur.com/1DMmyLy.jpg)

Somewhere near Alston on the way home.  I thought this was worth stopping for :)
(http://i.imgur.com/o5FtpT5.jpg)

Great day, I really enjoyed it.  I love the Lakes in winter, it's a different place :)  In other news, I haven't been up Gable since I started going to Scotland regularly and was delighted at how easy it was.  I often feel (like a lot of us, I suspect) that I'm out of shape or not particularly hill-fit, but this mountain which used to be such heavy going was really no problem at all today, granted I stopped about 100m short of the actual summit.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 16 February 2015, 05:31:04 PM

Oh, and Pedro: I would say that most non-North facing ascents of hills lower than around 700m in the Lakes are now clear, if you're still after a look across there.  Blencathra still has a bit toward the top, but there are some great choices which I'm sure snoopdawg and I (and others) will be happy to recommend if you want to try a different one :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 16 February 2015, 05:56:18 PM
Open C good effort on what looks like an iffy day. It just shows how much the british weather can change within a short time. Sometimes as you know its just about getting on with it. Looking at the snow levels on your pics it looks as though it had snowed overnight. Dare bet there wasn't many others out?

Good pics, like the one with the dogs, they look like they are waiting on a decision from you! and the final one with the clouds looking like an impending storm very atmospheric.

In relation to the fitness angle, don't know about you but it doesn't matter how much I do, for the first hour of any walk I always feel like I am blowing through my arse.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 16 February 2015, 06:08:35 PM
Open C good effort on what looks like an iffy day. It just shows how much the british weather can change within a short time. Sometimes as you know its just about getting on with it. Looking at the snow levels on your pics it looks as though it had snowed overnight. Dare bet there wasn't many others out?

Good pics, like the one with the dogs, they look like they are waiting on a decision from you! and the final one with the clouds looking like an impending storm very atmospheric.

In relation to the fitness angle, don't know about you but it doesn't matter how much I do, for the first hour of any walk I always feel like I am blowing through my arse.

Aye, definitely :lol:  I'm trying really hard to just slow down, because that's obviously the best way to maintain steady progress without wearing myself out, but it's so hard to do :lol:  Managed it today, though.  Felt like I could've done it again when I got back to the car, and it was only the weather that stopped me from heading up to Sprinkling Tarn from Styhead, which is something I would never previously have considered having (pretty much) climbed Gable already.

I was in the amazing position of having been first in the queue at Seathwaite, which has never happened to me before :)  Got there at about nine, not another soul.  Unheard of.  I passed a big party on the way back down (which I will recount a tale about later, involving my dog stealing their food), but it was really quiet.  The snow felt like overnight snow, was soft and slushy but giving way to harder stuff underneath, which isn't a great combination as you'll know.

Not getting to the top no longer gets me down; my mindset now is always that I'm out for a great walk and some pictures, and the further into the clag I go the less that's the case.  If I'd been on a new mountain, I would have pushed on for the top but Great Gable is one of those old standbys that doesn't need climbed again if the situation's not 100% right :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Tuesday 17 February 2015, 07:05:00 PM

Oh, and Pedro: I would say that most non-North facing ascents of hills lower than around 700m in the Lakes are now clear, if you're still after a look across there.  Blencathra still has a bit toward the top, but there are some great choices which I'm sure snoopdawg and I (and others) will be happy to recommend if you want to try a different one :)

First off great pics everyone. Yeah OC cheers mate i definitely still want to hit the lakes its just finding the time at the minute. Still excited at the thought of going up them. Will need a route not much more than 6 mile to start off to keep wor lass from moaning!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 17 February 2015, 07:49:07 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/pcLpJrw.jpg)

:thup:

Honestly, everybody recommends it for a reason.  An absolutely ideal first fell walk; short but hilly enough to feel tiring.  Will also let you know how you feel on steeper and more scrambly ground, which is important in the mountains.  Around 400m there's a real rock band which causes most people to put their hands down (which is more than you need to do on most routes).  Descent route is missing from the map but fairly obvious :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: NUFC_Chris on Tuesday 17 February 2015, 07:56:45 PM
I'm off to the Isle of Seil (Ellenebeich) in March. Just a weeks self catering. Never been up that part of the world before. Anyone been?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 17 February 2015, 07:59:05 PM

Aye, I went there with my parents when I was younger, over the Atlantic Bridge.  I don't know the island at all, but I remember that it's near Oban (and therefore Glencoe, and Ben Cruachan, and Fort William, and Glen Nevis and its surrounding mountains).
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: NUFC_Chris on Tuesday 17 February 2015, 08:06:26 PM
Aye I'd read it's just half an hour or so from Oban. Quite looking forward to it as I've never been anywhere near the western Isles. Will see if I can get a couple of crossings over on the ferries to a couple of places.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 18 February 2015, 05:19:21 PM
Cheers OC, next time me and the wench are off together and the forecast is fine we're doing it.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 18 February 2015, 07:30:55 PM
Make sure you don't leave it too late in the day; the parking where I put the X is pretty limited :)

Enjoy, though, it's a lovely little hill and a great introduction to steeper ground (and will give you a little glow every time you drive down the Borrowdale road from Keswick and look at it across Derwent Water).  And honestly, the little scramble to get up to the top is no problem but is just enough to make it exciting, and harder than what you'll do on 95% of other English hills.  The easiest route back down heads off to the left just a little way past the summit, you'll see it.  Don't fall into the trap of just keeping on going; the ridge leads to Maiden Moor, and High Spy, and ultimately Dale Head, Hindscarth and Robinson but one summit is probably enough for your first venture out onto the mountains :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 19 February 2015, 07:56:46 PM
Pedro/tooj

See attachment for a taster/short walk Langdale area. I haven't got memory map so this is the next best thing for me.

http://www.ukhillwalking.com/logbook/r/?i=877
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 22 February 2015, 11:57:52 AM
Bit quiet of late on here so I thought I would post some photographs of a 3 day backpacking trip back in 2008. Drove up and camped at the back of the Kingshouse in Glencoe. Made the drive quickly but the drive up to loch Quioch, about 6 1/2  hours was too far for the evening hence the overnight camp and a few beers. Trip report with map attachment.

http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=49595

(http://i.imgur.com/1yN9YkH.jpg?1)

Drove up towards Loch Quioch and parked up at the dam where there is a patch of rough ground to leave the car. Walked over the dam and down into Glen Kingie walking up the glen. Pitched the tent high up in Coire riabhach and went up onto Sgurr an Fhuarain and Sgurr Mor that night.

(http://i.imgur.com/hXzVua3.jpg?1)

View towards Sgurr na Ciche from the shoulder of Sgurr Mor

(http://i.imgur.com/rg8V9Bd.jpg?1)

Continued along the ridge the next day walking Sgurr Beag, An Eag, sgurr nan Coireachan, Garbh Chioch Mhor and Sgurr na Ciche. The photograph is Sgurr na Ciche in the centre, Garbh Chioch Mhor to the left

(http://i.imgur.com/TFMENXs.jpg?1)

The route off Sgurr na Ciche continues down Druim a Ghoirtain towards Loch Nevis

(http://i.imgur.com/ownhvCZ.jpg?1)

Overnight camipng area at Sourlies on Loch Nevis. Sourlies bothy is just off to the right.

(http://i.imgur.com/dEwXJXz.jpg?1)

The route continues towards Carnoch and up the glen following the river carnach. The photograph is the back of Sgurr na Ciche to the right and Ben aden to the left

(http://i.imgur.com/LZqqU0x.jpg?1)

Further shot of Sgurr na Ciche from the river Carnach

(http://i.imgur.com/22lftD0.jpg?1)

The path marked on the OS map ends and you have to make your own path up a spur which connects to the path that ascends Mam undalain towards Barrisdale. I turned right and walk towards Lochan nan Breac. The view is towards Sgurr mor

(http://i.imgur.com/fGFrs5b.jpg?1)

View backover Lochan na Breac towards Luinne Bheinn

(http://i.imgur.com/OlShFiC.jpg?1)

The route then continued over to the west dam of Loch quioch and followed the loch shore towards Leac na fearna which is pathless towards the headland spur where I camped overnight. The hills are Gairich to the left and Sgurr na Fhurain to the right

(http://i.imgur.com/Zto1Mm1.jpg?1)

Next morning got back to the car to and switched the phone on. As I drove back texts came through from home stating that the parked car had attracted the attention of a gamekeeper who had informed the local constabulary and local enqs had been made! 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Tuesday 24 February 2015, 08:54:59 AM
Epic stuff snoopdawg. I tried to camp at glencoe once, it was my first proper experience of the scottish midgies. We didnt even unravel the tent before we gave up.  :lol:  They properly swarmed us, I dont know how people can stand it in all honesty. The camp site we then went to had less of the little buggers but it was still horrendous.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 24 February 2015, 09:58:19 AM
Thanks for that Pedro. Your right the Scottish Midge can be a pain and can actually ruin a holiday. I actually gave up, going tent camping/ walking in Scotland in the summer months years ago. Its not fun being stuck in your tent in the heat just to keep away from the little bugggers. Its why I mainly go in the winter months and usually end in may and resume in September. I did go to the Ben alder region on the bank holiday a few years back as a planned trip had fallen through and I knew that the further away from the west coast you are they have a lesser impact and if I camped high I might avoid them but they still caught up with me as the photograph shows.

(http://i.imgur.com/G8PTG8J.jpg?1)

We were on Skye in July 2013 in the motorhome and camped by the Sligachan hotel. The weather was warm and a bit breeze all day. Anybody who has experienced the Skye midge will know that it is something else and vicious, how the hell forestry workers stand them is beyond me. As we sat in the van watching the setting sun and new arrivals putting tents up the breeze stopped and suddenly hell broke loose with people running around and diving for cover. There are creams you can use but for me the best way is to either stay away or have a van or a cottage/building you can get to.

You should try the West highlands again for camping but this time try the month of May which is for is when Scotland is at its best. The previous photographs were shot around the 8th may 2008
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Friday 27 February 2015, 05:12:10 PM
It was a canny day out the day like if not a little blowy. Drove the 30 miles from my house to the North York Moors to have a crack at Roseberry Topping aka the Yorkshire Matterhorn! :D 320 metres.

Apologies in advance for the pathetic quality phone pics. First stop captain cooks monument.

(http://s16.postimg.org/67wq7asz9/20150227_124715.jpg)

First glimpse of my destination. In the distance Roseberry Topping.
(http://s14.postimg.org/5sqgo0t75/20150227_125107.jpg)

Straining the zoom on my phone.
(http://s29.postimg.org/xporq3ep3/20150227_125514.jpg)

Lots of these fires everywhere. Not sure whats the craic with them. One of you lot will know.
(http://s28.postimg.org/5txdc7bgt/20150227_103223.jpg)

Getting closer to the Matterhorn ahem I mean Roseberry Topping.  :lol:
(http://s1.postimg.org/nga9eb4sf/20150227_103400.jpg)

There are routes up on all sides, this is mine.
(http://s7.postimg.org/s61a9v7iz/20150227_105355.jpg)

Stopped at the bottom for a cuppa and a Snickers. Let an old couple go ahead of me for fear of being overtook by them! :lol: Time to crack on.
(http://s21.postimg.org/w1n85fkfb/20150227_111203.jpg)

I made it to the top. Not afraid to admit that I was blowing out my backside and sweating like a pig when I got up there. The old man beat me but at least I beat the old lady!  :lol:
(http://s1.postimg.org/hq7z01dkv/20150227_112456.jpg)

The views at the top were amazing I just couldnt do them justice on my phone. Great views over the Boro and the moors and of course the north sea. Im sure I could see as far as Tynemouth over 30 plus mile away. Not a particularly long walk about 6 miles but there were quite a few steep climbs so my legs certainly felt it.

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 27 February 2015, 05:39:25 PM

Nice :thup:  Nowt like the first hill climb (or even just the first one in a while) to remind you of the difference between flat walking and steeper ground :)  Feels good getting to those trig points, doesn't it :)  Has it got you inspired to try the bigger hills..?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Friday 27 February 2015, 06:20:34 PM
Yeah mate im definitely on for the bigger hills. Id be doing them all the time its just the drive to them thats hampering me a bit. 70 odd mile to the Cheviots or 90 mile to the lakes but ill get there. I realise these distances are nowt to you and snoopdawg. :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Friday 27 February 2015, 06:29:25 PM


Lots of these fires everywhere. Not sure whats the craic with them. One of you lot will know.
(http://s28.postimg.org/5txdc7bgt/20150227_103223.jpg)


The fires are started by arseholes commonly referred to as gamekeepers, they burn the heather so that new growth comes through for the grouse to feed on.  We all know what happens to the grouse, another arsehole comes along and gets pleasure from killing living animals, this arsehole is usually but not always a rich b****** who gets a gun licence which is subsidised by the tax payer, us.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Friday 27 February 2015, 06:35:49 PM
Grim. I saw about 4 or 5 of these fires.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 27 February 2015, 07:07:08 PM
Yeah mate im definitely on for the bigger hills. Id be doing them all the time its just the drive to them thats hampering me a bit. 70 odd mile to the Cheviots or 90 mile to the lakes but ill get there. I realise these distances are nowt to you and snoopdawg. :lol:
No man, makes perfect sense.  Ultimately, if you want to climb the big mountains then you have to get to them, but it's more important to get out and walk wherever :)

If I were thee, I'd leave the Cheviots until later and head for the Lakes which has much more shapely hills and generally better viewpoints which will satisfy you more as a new hillwalker (although I maintain that the view from Windy Gyle is better than anything in the lakes).  These days I prefer the Cheviots but I'll never forget my early walks on Blencathra, Great Gable, Helvellyn and Scafell Pike :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Friday 27 February 2015, 07:53:54 PM
Yeah mate Im aiming to do all the big ones in the lakes this year. Cant wait to get cracking. Hopefully have one or two ticked off by the end of March.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 27 February 2015, 09:06:25 PM
Pedro.

Well done on stepping up   :clap2: :indi: Apart from being knackered bet you felt great on getting to the cairn.

Hopefully the start of bigger things.
   
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Saturday 28 February 2015, 08:40:51 AM
Cheers snoopdawg. It felt like a great achievement but really exposed my fitness or lack thereof for the climbs. I wasnt completely f***ed or anything its just that i was more tired than id like to be but the climbs on my route were pretty steep I think but then i have nothing to judge them on.  We shall see when i hit the lakes.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Saturday 28 February 2015, 10:59:41 AM

No man, makes perfect sense.  Ultimately, if you want to climb the big mountains then you have to get to them, but it's more important to get out and walk wherever :)

If I were thee, I'd leave the Cheviots until later and head for the Lakes which has much more shapely hills and generally better viewpoints which will satisfy you more as a new hillwalker (although I maintain that the view from Windy Gyle is better than anything in the lakes).  These days I prefer the Cheviots but I'll never forget my early walks on Blencathra, Great Gable, Helvellyn and Scafell Pike :)

Do you not think Simonside would be a good one for him?  The views on a clear day are as good as you'll get.

http://www.northumberlandnationalpark.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/148933/simonsidefamily-adult-lo.pdf

http://www.northumberlandnationalpark.org.uk/visiting/thingstodo/walking/rangersfavouritewalks/simonsidefamilywalk
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 28 February 2015, 11:20:39 AM
those links are great mick anybody else got anything like that would be useful.


Hoping to 'maybe' :lol:  do Blencathra and the illusive fkin high street sometime soon.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 28 February 2015, 11:57:23 AM
Aye, Simonside is lovely as well but not sure it's worth the drive when a bit further would get to Blencathra.  It never disappoints me, but I just live four or five miles from it so I never have to make a day of it :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Saturday 28 February 2015, 02:43:52 PM
Aye, Simonside is lovely as well but not sure it's worth the drive when a bit further would get to Blencathra.  It never disappoints me, but I just live four or five miles from it so I never have to make a day of it :)
Am I right in thinking that you can see Gosforth Park on a good day from Simonside?  I remember seeing it from somewhere and seeing it from Simonside rings a bell.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 28 February 2015, 02:55:36 PM
Aye, Simonside is lovely as well but not sure it's worth the drive when a bit further would get to Blencathra.  It never disappoints me, but I just live four or five miles from it so I never have to make a day of it :)
Am I right in thinking that you can see Gosforth Park on a good day from Simonside?  I remember seeing it from somewhere and seeing it from Simonside rings a bell.

Based on this (http://www.viewfinderpanoramas.org/panoramas/ENGP/TOSSON%20HILL.png), albeit that's exaggerated and from the slightly higher very end of the ridge at Tosson Hill, I woud have thought so, aye.  The view across to the Cheviots is also the best one in the North East (the best one which isn't in the Cheviots itself, anyway).
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Saturday 28 February 2015, 05:29:11 PM


Based on this (http://www.viewfinderpanoramas.org/panoramas/ENGP/TOSSON%20HILL.png), albeit that's exaggerated and from the slightly higher very end of the ridge at Tosson Hill, I woud have thought so, aye.  The view across to the Cheviots is also the best one in the North East (the best one which isn't in the Cheviots itself, anyway).

I'm sure I could also see Blyth and some of the castles along the coast.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 28 February 2015, 05:36:31 PM
Aye, you will have been able to.  That panorama is from Tosson Hill which is the end of the Simonside ridge (and the one usually named in hill lists, since it's higher, although strangely you don't really notice it in the usual "stepped" profile that Simonside has from a lot of the coast).  Simonside itself appears in the NE aspect as a bulky hill blocking out most of Northumberland to the East, and is getting in the way of what you could actually see from it :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 28 February 2015, 05:40:09 PM
You can use this wonderful thing (http://www.udeuschle.selfhost.pro/panoramas/makepanoramas_en.htm) to check the viewpoint from anywhere you like, though..
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Saturday 28 February 2015, 05:44:59 PM
those links are great mick anybody else got anything like that would be useful.


Hoping to 'maybe' :lol:  do Blencathra and the illusive fkin high street sometime soon.

Try this for High Street http://www.ukhillwalking.com/logbook/r/?i=77 and you might be lucky enough to see the Eagle which spends quite a bit of time below Rough Crag.  You will be better off going early if you're parking a car at the far end of Haweswater as the car park it not too big and it's popular with walkers.  If it was me, I would be tempted to take a right just before the 3 on the map and go past Kidsty Pike.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 28 February 2015, 05:51:42 PM
those links are great mick anybody else got anything like that would be useful.


Hoping to 'maybe' :lol:  do Blencathra and the illusive fkin high street sometime soon.

Try this for High Street http://www.ukhillwalking.com/logbook/r/?i=77 and you might be lucky enough to see the Eagle which spends quite a bit of time below Rough Crag.  You will be better off going early if you're parking a car at the far end of Haweswater as the car park it not too big and it's popular with walkers.  If it was me, I would be tempted to take a right just before the 3 on the map and go past Kidsty Pike.


Cheers, turned round the last 3 times :lol:  from glenridding, sandwick and pooley bridge- maybe that routes worth a try.

edit gradual as well, just what im looking for.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 28 February 2015, 05:55:22 PM
Aye, Haweswater is the classic way to High Street.  Long Stile is a good approach to it, and I would agree with Mick's variaion :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Saturday 28 February 2015, 06:01:33 PM



Cheers, turned round the last 3 times :lol:  from glenridding, sandwick and pooley bridge- maybe that routes worth a try.



It's quite easy as you have a fairly level and short walk from the car park and then you're straight into the climb after an easy .75 miles. You get the worst of it out of the way early while you're fresh and then you can enjoy it.

Edit.

I would take walking poles if I was going to do it.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Saturday 28 February 2015, 07:48:42 PM
You can use this wonderful thing (http://www.udeuschle.selfhost.pro/panoramas/makepanoramas_en.htm) to check the viewpoint from anywhere you like, though..

That is class. From Roseberry Topping you can see The Cheviot, thats 78 miles away as the crow flies.  :o
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 28 February 2015, 07:57:58 PM

And from Cheviot you can see Beinn a'Ghlo and Meall nan Tarmachan, 179km away, which I thought I did one day and the bloke I was with told me I was f***ing insane :lol:  To be fair, I was wrong and claimed it to be Ben Lawers (but that's right next door to Tarmachan, and a fair bit higher, so you should be able to see that as well).
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Saturday 28 February 2015, 08:18:20 PM



What do you use them for Mick- would they help hill walking with a gammy ankle.?


edit- I walk wagon ways locally quite a lot and see groups of walkers on flat tarmac paths walking with poles.

They help steady you when walking, I'm not sure how necessary they are for flat tarmac paths but they are good for uneven ground and walking up hills.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Saturday 28 February 2015, 08:20:17 PM

And from Cheviot you can see Beinn a'Ghlo and Meall nan Tarmachan, 179km away, which I thought I did one day and the bloke I was with told me I was f***ing insane :lol:  To be fair, I was wrong and claimed it to be Ben Lawers (but that's right next door to Tarmachan, and a fair bit higher, so you should be able to see that as well).

Think im gonna have to invest in some binos and see if i can pick some places out in future.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Saturday 28 February 2015, 08:21:35 PM



What do you use them for Mick- would they help hill walking with a gammy ankle.?


edit- I walk wagon ways locally quite a lot and see groups of walkers on flat tarmac paths walking with poles.

They help steady you when walking, I'm not sure how necessary they are for flat tarmac paths but they are good for uneven ground and walking up hills.



yeah, just deleted that post cos I found this.

http://www.headtothehills.co.uk/articles/92-gear-guide-how-to-use-walking-poles.html


gonna look into that, as its a bad ankle thats stopped me going on any hills worthy of this thread for a couple of years.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 1 March 2015, 07:20:43 PM
Started using one walking pole 7 years ago, in fact on the backpacking trip I featured now I wouldn't be without it. The poles are ideal for balance, keep you upright if carrying a heavy pack as the body tends to slouch with the weight, are great for going downhill as they can be used  as a support, act as a third leg in river crossings and can fend off an angry farm dog!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Sunday 1 March 2015, 09:02:20 PM
I've never used trekking poles but maybe I will this year when I start doing some of the gnarly 14ers.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 1 March 2015, 09:06:08 PM
Give them a go you will feel the benefit, especially on the big hills.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Sunday 1 March 2015, 09:06:14 PM
I joined a Colorado 14ers group on Facebook and some of the images they have been posting are making my mouth water for the summer months. There's not a lot of action going on up there right now as most of the 14ers are covered in snow pack, but this one from last summer has me like. :yikes:

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t31.0-8/10991676_10153648182523709_4533627220963917459_o.jpg)

Can't wait for Spring.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 1 March 2015, 09:15:15 PM
Looks good, look forward to some pics and a trip report.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Monday 2 March 2015, 01:52:30 AM
Started using one walking pole 7 years ago, in fact on the backpacking trip I featured now I wouldn't be without it. The poles are ideal for balance, keep you upright if carrying a heavy pack as the body tends to slouch with the weight, are great for going downhill as they can be used  as a support, act as a third leg in river crossings and can fend off an angry farm dog!

They can also give you an idea about how deep the river is before you find out to your expense.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 2 March 2015, 02:59:23 PM
Looks unreal that Cuba!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Monday 2 March 2015, 03:15:11 PM
I joined a Colorado 14ers group on Facebook and some of the images they have been posting are making my mouth water for the summer months. There's not a lot of action going on up there right now as most of the 14ers are covered in snow pack, but this one from last summer has me like. :yikes:

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t31.0-8/10991676_10153648182523709_4533627220963917459_o.jpg)

Can't wait for Spring.


 :kasper:

Amzing, totally want to be there!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 2 March 2015, 05:21:33 PM
For anybody stuck in the UK wanting a similar experience, that looks a lot like the approach to Stob Ban up Coire Mhusgain from the bottom of Glen Nevis, only with trees and more rocks, less mud (and with a slightly higher mountain :lol: although Stob Ban is shapely enough) :) 

I'm sure snoopdawg will be happy to confirm the fleeting similarity :shifty:

(http://www.stevenfallon.co.uk/photos/mamores/photo3.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 2 March 2015, 07:23:42 PM
Yeah good spot, its a bit rockier, but the shape even down to the upper corrie is similar. Nice pic.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 08:50:42 AM
I feel safer with trees around, the same with skiing.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 09:51:33 AM
For anybody wanting Cheaper, but not cheap Berghaus gear the store in the metro centre is having a closing down sale and is due to close 15/03/2015. Was in there yesterday , everything has a sale tag on.

Its a shame with on line sales being blamed, it now only leaves LD, Cotswolds, Go Outdoors Blacks and rock and ice in the area.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 10:01:36 AM
I picked up a decent North Face goose down coat for 150 the other week, from the north face shop.  I can use it for skiing as well, thought it would make a canny light weight coat for our trip to Canada.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 10:20:43 AM
Where is the North face shop??
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Fret Astaire on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 10:26:35 AM
For anybody stuck in the UK wanting a similar experience, that looks a lot like the approach to Stob Ban up Coire Mhusgain from the bottom of Glen Nevis, only with trees and more rocks, less mud (and with a slightly higher mountain :lol: although Stob Ban is shapely enough) :) 

I'm sure snoopdawg will be happy to confirm the fleeting similarity :shifty:

(http://www.stevenfallon.co.uk/photos/mamores/photo3.jpg)

Took three non-mountaineer friends up this sucker when on holiday in Glen Nevis last November. The look on their faces when we hit the steep scree towards the summit...  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 10:30:37 AM
I feel safer with trees around, the same with skiing.


trees seem more dangerous in terms of skiing?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 10:35:43 AM
I feel safer with trees around, the same with skiing.


trees seem more dangerous in terms of skiing?

A Tree lined ski run, i meant.  Not off piste.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 10:45:24 AM
I feel safer with trees around, the same with skiing.


trees seem more dangerous in terms of skiing?

A Tree lined ski run, i meant.  Not off piste.


ah, right, not zig-zagging between them james bond style.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 11:15:02 AM
I feel safer with trees around, the same with skiing.


trees seem more dangerous in terms of skiing?

A Tree lined ski run, i meant.  Not off piste.


ah, right, not zig-zagging between them james bond style.

No, no, no.  Totally dangerous.  I like nice wide tree lined slopes.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 12:36:26 PM
Where is the North face shop??
Next to Monument metro.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 01:12:41 PM
Where is the North face shop??
Next to Monument metro.

Is it new? must have missed it.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 09:16:14 PM
For anybody stuck in the UK wanting a similar experience, that looks a lot like the approach to Stob Ban up Coire Mhusgain from the bottom of Glen Nevis, only with trees and more rocks, less mud (and with a slightly higher mountain :lol: although Stob Ban is shapely enough) :) 

I'm sure snoopdawg will be happy to confirm the fleeting similarity :shifty:

(http://www.stevenfallon.co.uk/photos/mamores/photo3.jpg)

Took three non-mountaineer friends up this sucker when on holiday in Glen Nevis last November. The look on their faces when we hit the steep scree towards the summit...  :lol:
Another Glen Nevis mountain I climbed in thick cloud which I saw nowt from, just like Sgurr a'Mhaim and Mullach nan Coirean.  Stob Ban is on the reclimb list, though, unlike the other two.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: 54 on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 09:20:39 PM
Someone I know just sent me this photo that he took this morning, lucky b******:
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/v/t35.0-12/906339_10206109310832336_1280135015332727169_o.jpg?oh=08426961933640d187cc2db156b322a0&oe=54F8DECF&__gda__=1425582000_a33473a14689d1522960b0d5aae1a2da)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 10:12:15 PM
Where is that? Canada? ,Alaska?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: 54 on Tuesday 3 March 2015, 10:25:56 PM
Where is that? Canada? ,Alaska?
Alaska, don't know where exactly, but apparently there are some pretty epic hikes to be had around area.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kevo on Wednesday 4 March 2015, 01:35:26 AM
Apologies for being pretty clueless, but I am going to spend 6 months in the Falkland Islands in August, and will be buying myself a pair of warm shoes/boots and warm waterproof trousers.

Any recommendations? I don't want mega expensive stuff, but obviously they need to be decent enought to keep me warm and dry for when I am out seeing the sights on my days off. I managed to buy a good jacket on Groupon for £30 so that is sorted.

I have been on the usual Go Outdoors and Mountain Warehouse websites, but literally do not have a clue what is good/bad.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 4 March 2015, 05:48:21 AM

What are you going to be doing..?  If you're working out there and you're going to be spending a bit of time sat around in the cold not moving very much then warm and waterproof trousers are the order of the day, right enough; if you're going to be getting about, then warm and waterproof is sometimes a little bit too much.  I have some lined waterproof trousers which are wonderful, but which I only choose to wear on the very coldest of days, with howling and freezing wind.  I prefer regular walking trousers and carry some cheap waterproof overtrousers with me to put on as I need to.

With regard to boots, just buy what's comfortable.. but if you want waterproof, IMO, you should stick with one piece leather boots, something like these (http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/brasher-hillwalker-ii-gtx-p213697), although I would stress that I've never owned these.  I always wear very heavy four season mountaineering boots, which are probably more than you need.  Stitched fabric always fails eventually, although they're the most comfortable.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 4 March 2015, 10:05:06 AM
A check of the average temperatures for August up to January shows anything from 2 c to 18/19 c in January. As your requirement for clothing will be dictated by the expectant weather it might not do any harm to post a question on these websites, most questions seem to get an answer

http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/ShowForum-g294270-i10985-Falkland_Islands.html

http://forum.virtualtourist.com/Falkland_Islands-2372-2/forum.html
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kevo on Wednesday 4 March 2015, 03:46:12 PM
Cheers for both of those replies!

I am going to be working indoors  mainly, in an Operations room (in the RAF). So will be in my work uniform whilst on shift. But apparently there is plenty of time to get out and see the Islands, doing various expedition, seeing the wildlife, adventure training etc. I think I might go for normal walking trousers as you say, and also have a cheap pair of waterproofs to carry in a bag when out and about.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 4 March 2015, 04:21:41 PM
Started using one walking pole 7 years ago, in fact on the backpacking trip I featured now I wouldn't be without it. The poles are ideal for balance, keep you upright if carrying a heavy pack as the body tends to slouch with the weight, are great for going downhill as they can be used  as a support, act as a third leg in river crossings and can fend off an angry farm dog!

They can also give you an idea about how deep the river is before you find out to your expense.

Dug out some trek poles today.   tried them in the garden :lol:  Luckily surrounded by conifers so nobody could see me.  need to read up- get some ideas how to use these.
I appear to be using more energy swinging them and placing them, than anything ( ie nothing) Im gaining from them.
Obviously there's a technique and different ways for differing terrains.

Hoping to achieve something like a 4 legged stick insect scuttling across the hills, rather than an old man with a walking stick.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Wednesday 4 March 2015, 06:11:50 PM
Started using one walking pole 7 years ago, in fact on the backpacking trip I featured now I wouldn't be without it. The poles are ideal for balance, keep you upright if carrying a heavy pack as the body tends to slouch with the weight, are great for going downhill as they can be used  as a support, act as a third leg in river crossings and can fend off an angry farm dog!

They can also give you an idea about how deep the river is before you find out to your expense.

Dug out some trek poles today.   tried them in the garden :lol:  Luckily surrounded by conifers so nobody could see me.  need to read up- get some ideas how to use these.
I appear to be using more energy swinging them and placing them, than anything ( ie nothing) Im gaining from them.
Obviously there's a technique and different ways for differing terrains.

Hoping to achieve something like a 4 legged stick insect scuttling across the hills, rather than an old man with a walking stick.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7ShLirVcDU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtIHlAppSMU

http://www.headtothehills.co.uk/articles/233-adjusting-and-maintaining-your-trekking-poles.html

http://www.headtothehills.co.uk/articles/92-gear-guide-how-to-use-walking-poles.html

http://www.highpointholidays.co.uk/top-tips/how-to-use-walking-poles.asp
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 4 March 2015, 06:58:54 PM
 :thup:

spot on them links Mick.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 6 March 2015, 12:58:37 PM
Some photos from back in 2010 of Bynack More in the Cairngorms. This was third time lucky in the ascent of this hill. The first time I tried it the snow was deep and soft, the type that requires snow shoes, there was no trace of a path and I gave up at about 2500ft. The second time I tried it I got beating back by a ferocious gale in a week in which the corrugated shed at Bynack stables had been blown off its moorings and deposited about 50 feet to the north. As you can see from the photos it was waiting for.

The approach path to Bynack more, the route taken was from Glenmore towards Ryvoan bothy then cut right towards Bynack Stable was then up over the moorland path.
(http://i.imgur.com/Q6x5pRS.jpg?1)

The ridge leading up to Bynack more. To give an idea of the scale two walkers can be seen just beginning to ascend

(http://i.imgur.com/GwYnCfp.jpg?1)

The view northwards from the top

(http://i.imgur.com/7aF8zQ4.jpg?1)

You then follow the path over to A , Choinneach passing the barns of bynack as you walk. The photo is towards the heart of the northern cairngorms Loch Avon (pronounced Aan ) The crag at the loch is the shelter stone crag, Ben Macdui is the hill behind and the slopes of Cairngorm off to the right

(http://i.imgur.com/BOMNHUY.jpg?1)

Picture on the path towards the saddle, the hill I think is Beinn Mheadhoin (vane)

(http://i.imgur.com/9JB8uqv.jpg?1)

The path drops down to the saddle and then cuts back through the glen on a boggy path towards Bynack stables area. About 14 miles.

For the last 8 years I've been going to Scotland in the first or second week of April. This year is not far away :cheesy: :mike:   
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 6 March 2015, 06:35:23 PM
I'm going up at the start of April as well, Bank Holiday Monday week.  Where you headed?

Bynack More is still on my "too remote" list, but that's the route I have planned for it.  Bottom car park on the ski road, aye?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 6 March 2015, 07:17:01 PM
I've got potentially 10 days to spare and the aim is to get onto munro tops that I haven't visited before so there are two plans running through my mind. I'll be going up In the van so my plans are pretty loose in that I can travel a distance if the weather is better in one area and there always kipping spots available.

The main plan is travel up to Arrochar and do Ben Vane, then around the corner and do Beinn Bhuide. I then want to get onto Stuc a Chroin, I've been on Ben vorlich but not its adjoining munro and then do the end hill of the Lawers range Meall griegh which I missed out on when doing this range. I then want to do Beinn Achaladair and Beinn A Chreachain overlooking Rannoch moor and hopefully include Beinn Mhanach. The next hills would be Beinn nan Aighenan Stob coir an albannaich and Meall nan Eun from Glen Etive. I would then have a half day on Beinn Sgulaird from Loch creran and then take the van onto the Glen Nevis site to charge up and refill and of course have a few beers. That is seven hill days, hopefully the fitness lasts. If the weather holds I might then have a look up to Kintail/Affric areas.

The other plan that I was considering was to head up to Glenshee area and over a few days do the hills to the west of the Devils elbow from Dalmulzie and inverey. As I'm in that area I might take the bike and cycle into Glen Geldie from the Linn of Dee and do An Sgarsoch. I would then go to Mount keen and from Glen Muick do Lochnagar. I've done Lochnagar before but missed out on Carn a chiore Bhoiheach. That is probably six hill days and I think I would drive around to the hills around Newtonmore and do them over two days

Best laid plans and all that, hopefully it will all work out. I've been trying to bang away at the fitness and the standard of fitness I gain from this hopefully will aid my May walk on the cape Wrath trail which I'm starting from fort William on the 2nd of May.

Whats your plans?   
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 6 March 2015, 07:19:31 PM
Regarding Bynack more I parked just after the last houses in Glenmore. You can follow the road up to Glenmore Lodge and park the car there on the outside of the centre. There is also a new car park which I think is signposted for Ryvoan pass which is further away from the village up the ski road
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 6 March 2015, 07:25:41 PM
I'm up with the family in Onich again, just for four nights. Hoping to do Buachaille Etive Mor at last, or maybe Bidean nam Bian up the easy way. Also the Aonachs with the gondola are on my hit list.

Not sure about bad weather alternatives around there; maybe some of the Etive hills, possibly Starav.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 6 March 2015, 07:36:07 PM
Enjoy, possible other alternatives could be driving along to Glenfinnan and doing and Sgurr nan Coireachain  and Sgurr Thuilm, clockwise is best if you haven't been there before?

(http://i.imgur.com/0A5Wasc.jpg?1)

Or drive along to Creag Meagaidh, about 45 minutes drive from Fort William. If the weather is bad its a 3 mile low level walk into the corrie   
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 March 2015, 05:17:28 PM
Haven't been up any of those, so I'll keep them in mind if the weather looks better further North or East :thup:

For the time being, just a quick dogwalk up Brough Law in Ingram Valley to the hillfort on top..

Up
(http://i.imgur.com/7g95XNV.jpg)

The house/bothy on Ewe Hill across the valley
(http://i.imgur.com/y3FFizm.jpg)

Shill Moor
(http://i.imgur.com/j0VHmUt.jpg)

Dunmoor Hill
(http://i.imgur.com/pwhVuGD.jpg)

Down
(http://i.imgur.com/uFmQc97.jpg)

You don't have to go miles from civilisation or be out for hours to get a decent stretch and a good view :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 8 March 2015, 06:40:26 PM
Looks nice, some good pics there. I toyed with the idea of going out today but was put off by the wind, looks as though it died down a bit?

Just to get my bearings in the shots of dunmoor Hill and Shill moor is the road?, the road going to the road end at linhope?

Also the house/bothy on ewe Hill is that a usable bothy? 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 March 2015, 06:55:51 PM
Aye, that's the road end at Hartside you can see, where you park for Linhope and Hedgehope.  Not sure what that house is, I only ever see it from there :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 8 March 2015, 07:02:38 PM
Have you been on Bloodybush edge and Cushat Law? and if so what route did you use?

I had a look at these two when I started my last outing on Hedgehope and its two hills I've never set foot on.

I've got a spare day on Tuesday, the weather looks decent and I might consider these two.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 March 2015, 07:36:10 PM
Aye, I have.  Went up from the Ewartly Shank road, over Hogdon Law first.  Terrain is abominable (hidden peat holes between Hogdon and Cushat that I fell into more times than I care to remember, and which made me petrified about the dogs) and the summits aren't anything to write home about.  Went back the same way and added Wether Cairn as well, was a fairly big day for the Cheviots although you start high so there are no massive unbroken ascents.

Can't imagine I'll be back, although Cushat Law might be better approached from Salter's Road/Bleakhope underneath it, and Bloodybush Edge is probably better from the road up to the Border Ridge, toward Uswayford.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 8 March 2015, 08:18:17 PM
Thanks for that, might give them a go.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 8 March 2015, 08:24:16 PM
Would be interested to read about it if you do :thup: if I was doing it again and wanting to do both, I would probably start from Ewartly Shank again but go past it and climb the Bush Knowe spur between Smalehope Burn and Hareshaw Cleugh, then descend Bloodybush down to Salter's Road and return past the Bleakhopes.. never actually been in that valley mind, so it may well be awful.  The ridge on the other side, High Cantle and Shielcleugh Edge, is not so very inspirational either :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 8 March 2015, 08:26:27 PM
I shall study the map tomorrow and check out your thoughts. O0
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 9 March 2015, 01:49:55 PM
Had a look at the map and after the comments regarding bogs and which it will be at the minute I looked at going from Barrowburn in Upper Coquetdale and doing both in a linear route which worked out at around 14 miles. However looking at the map I decided I would drive and park at Langleeford and instead of going up Cheviot by the traditional route up Scald Hill, go up by the Hawsen burn all the way up to Dunsdale and then drop into the College valley, which I've never been in before, ascend The Schil from the valley and then follow the border ridge before dropping and then ascending Cheviot via the Hen hole, onto Cheviot and then back to Langleeford via Scald hill. Checked it out mapping on walkhighlands it works out at 15 mile. weather looks good.

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 9 March 2015, 05:40:15 PM
That's my favourite way of climbing Cheviot (although I've never included The Schil in it).  Enjoy.  Climbing up Bizzle Crags way is also an option from that side, but obviously much shorter than what you have planned.  I'm on a half day myself so you might meet me coming up the other way.  If you see a bloke puffing and blowing on the final ascent from Scald Hill with a little black and white cocker, say hello :)

Cushat Law and Bloodybush will be bottomless at the minute, I would say you're doing the right thing :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 9 March 2015, 05:47:25 PM
Oh, and regarding Hen Hole, just in case this hasn't already occurred to you: it's always a delight to scramble up there but when you get to the top where the valley cuts to the right and the crags stop, you'll have to climb steeply out on slippery wet grass (that 'hard' and flat grass that you find in the Cheviots, don't know what it's really called) then negotiate the peat hags on top of Cheviot to get back to the path, which will be dire.  Personally, unless it's drier than expected, I would consider just climbing the ridge to the South which continues from The Schil and goes straight up to Auchope Cairn and save Hen Hole for a drier spell.  You know what you're doing but if you're new to Hen Hole, it deserves better than the anticlimactic nightmare of finding your way out of it without sinking into the peat :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 9 March 2015, 07:11:55 PM
I initially thought about going up via the Bizzle crags but as I've got all day and its light later I thought I would push on and go via The Schil. Appreciate what you say about the Hen hole, I've been there twice, once on a school trip and secondly in the mid 90,s on a walk from Town Yetholm via the Schil  and I remember the bogs however I think I might go via the Hen hole as its one of the Cheviots more interesting areas, certainly enough to merit 1/2 mile of bog!

Not been to Langleeford for a while, is there ample room for leaving the car?

I'll look out for you, though as its the end my day I,ll think I,ll be the one huffing and puffing!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 9 March 2015, 07:15:09 PM
Aye, there's a big car park (well, a flat bit of riverside haugh that you can get your car onto) at the end of the public road in Langleeford, it's very rarely full and certainly won't be midweek in March.  Hawsen Burn is easier this time of year as well, it gets really overgrown with bracken in late summer and can be a pain in the arse to get through (particularly if the bracken is wet).

Hen Hole is pretty much as good as it gets in the Cheviots (I assumed you hadn't been since you hadn't been to the College Valley, I didn't think you'd have approached it along the ridge).  It's just once you're up the crags and waterfalls and you have to make your way out of it that it can turn into a nightmare.. anyway, might see you tomorrow; have a good day :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 10 March 2015, 05:02:25 PM
Ended up going out with the good lady who didn't fancy Cheviot so had an easy wander up Windy Gyle instead. Great day for it :) maybe pictures in a bit, but I have posted these pictures lots of times before..
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Tuesday 10 March 2015, 05:03:21 PM
Saw the Instagram, stunning stuff.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 10 March 2015, 05:12:16 PM

Aye, that's a lovely (and easy) walk, one of my absolute favourites.  I don't believe there are many, if any, better views in England (although technically it's not; the summit of Windy Gyle is on the Scottish side of the border).
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 10 March 2015, 05:21:19 PM
I will post only this image of the ridge between The Schil (left skyline) and Cheviot (big f*** off mountain on the right), to demonstrate the high level part of snoopdawg's route of the day.  Descent into the College Valley and reascent by way of Hen Hole not shown here; neither is the six or seven mile walk to gain The Schil or the leg-pounding descent off the other side of Cheviot :)

(http://i.imgur.com/27RzJGm.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 10 March 2015, 07:55:39 PM
Had an awesome day sunshine all day bit windier and colder than I expected.not long been and typing this from a kindle so will post pics tomorrow.done 15 miles and a bit knackered now.oc pleased you had a good day it was great to be out.did the route exactly as I described,well impressed with the back of cheviot, it was like Ben Avon from Glen Avon.did the hen hole managed to avoid the bogs totally by cutting back from the top of the hen hole to auchope cairn,in fact the only real big was coming down from cheviot
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 10 March 2015, 08:08:48 PM

Tremendous stuff, how long did it take you..?  North side of Cheviot is the proper side of the hill, it's just that you can't see it from anywhere except the valley you were in and the hills that are immediately North of that, Newton Tors and Harelaw way.  I'm guessing if that was the first time you set eyes on Bizzle Crags as well, you'll be heading back to go up that way too..?  Any snow left in Hen Hole?  Usually holds it until quite late.

It was really cold and windy when we set out as well, dropped off around 3PM and got really quite pleasant.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 10 March 2015, 08:35:06 PM
Took 8 1/2 hrs,yeah first time I've set eyes on the bizzle crags think I'll give it a go in the snow,if we get more this year if not it'll keep till next winter,there was no snow in the hen hole,I've a new found respect for the cheviot hopefully the pics are good they were into the sun quite a lot of the time
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 10 March 2015, 08:43:27 PM

Sounds like a great day :thup:  Looking forward to seeing the pictures when I get home from graft tomorrow.  The Cheviots (and Cheviot itself) are much better than people give them credit for; you just have to work a bit harder to find the good bits :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 10:35:38 AM
Looking at my previous posts looks like I was half cut!! bloody kindle.

Set off early and got to Langleeford around 08.45hrs. Cant believe the amount of HGV,S that are using the A697 these days. Its been my traditional route to Scotland for as long as can remember as I find it a better road to drive and quicker than the A1, obviously a lot of HGV drivers do as well. It was a good start to the day the sun was up in a clear cloudless sky. It was a bit cold and breezy in the valley necessitating hats and gloves at the start. I don't normally wear gloves as I walk warm so you can guess it was around freezing. Its been a few years since I've been to Langleeford and I forgotten how scenic these Cheviot valleys are.
This was my first non snow walk of the year and I was eager to try out a new pair of boots ,Meindl Bhutan which I had bought as the non winter option and hopefully to use on the Cape wrath Trail (CWT ) in May this year, I've worn them around the doors on local walks but nothing as demanding or lengthy as this walk.

Set off up the Hawsen Burn and as usual felt like crap for the first hour. The paths are well marked, however I was still checking the map as there offshoots everywhere and it was new paths for me. I did manage to lose track of the path as I dropped down from the moor from the top of the Hawsen burn after veering left towards Scald hill for about 100 yards but regained it after a quick map check and a bit of heather bashing. The path after that was straightforward, a mixture of forest roads and paths. Once in the valley I got the first view of the back of the Cheviot. Its a pity that the camera doesn't capture what the eye can see. As I walked along the valley the Cheviot reminded me of the back of Ben Avon from Glen Avon in the cairngorms in that its a big bulky hill with various spurs dropping down to valley hill. Its certainly not the hill so often seen by people ascending via the normal routes, before today I include myself in that, in that it is a boggy featureless summit. After today I've got a new found respect for the Cheviot itself. Its a hill of many features. After walking down through the valley past the isolated buildings of Goldscluegh and Dunsdale something I was a bit nervous about as the path passes right through them and I was wary of farm collie dogs I  ascended The Schil from the College valley reaching the top at around 12.30hrs. I think at that stage it was around 6.25 miles. First time in Scotland this year!
I continued on along the border ridge as I walked towards the refuge hut. As I walked I was able to study the top area of the Hen Hole and I reckoned that if followed the natural line of the Hen hole as it curved to the right I reckoned  that if I cut to the right I would be able to get onto the area of the Auchope cairn which I knew had a paved section. That way I would avoid the endless bogs that are at the end of the Hen Hole. I was proved right not hitting one bog. Onto Cheviot 15.30hrs where I saw and spoke to the first person of the day a photographer capturing clouds. After a chat it was time for downhill and I got muddy for the first time of the day coming down from Cheviot. I made the mistake of following an estate track downhill from Scald hill area and dropped down into the valley too early which left a mile walk back to the car getting there at 17.10hrs. All in ,15 miles and 8 1/2 hours on an awesome day. If people read this don't get put off by the distance or times its just I,m on a fitness mission at the minute for a reason and need to push myself. Feel good this morning, expected sore feet and body but have neither. Apologies if you think the report is too long or too many photos.

Hedgehope Hill from the valley
(http://i.imgur.com/dLbF1Jm.jpg?1)

Path up over Hawsen burn
(http://i.imgur.com/EAPPAMJ.jpg?1)

First view of the back of Cheviot, as I said the photo doesn't doo it justice
 (http://i.imgur.com/15tyofi.jpg?1)

Another view of the Cheviot
(http://i.imgur.com/q6b1mTU.jpg?1)

Bizzle crags, definitely get back here in the snow
(http://i.imgur.com/PTQLu0T.jpg?1)

The Schil from the college valley
(http://i.imgur.com/2ttw3Rn.jpg?1)

Upper College valley
(http://i.imgur.com/0k3IrVd.jpg?1)

Top of the Schil
(http://i.imgur.com/dt3VbD3.jpg?1)

Continuation of the border ridge towards Auchope cairn
(http://i.imgur.com/T3g2ucr.jpg?1)

The Hen Hole and the refuge hut
(http://i.imgur.com/hpl55jg.jpg?1)

The hen hole
(http://i.imgur.com/qpri5db.jpg?1)

Pictures from higher up in the hen hole
(http://i.imgur.com/oAW6Zq4.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/c70QuUu.jpg?1)

Picture looking out of the Hen Hole towards the refuge hut
(http://i.imgur.com/ZpD1Km2.jpg?1)

Auchope cairn
(http://i.imgur.com/Gc1A8H9.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/aZTOEEa.jpg?1)
 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 11:18:14 AM
Some inspirational photos in here man. :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 05:57:54 PM
Aye, looks great.  I can walk through your entire route in my head, I love that part of the world (and it's always great to find somebody else having that Cheviot Nordwand revelation, it's a really great looking hill from that side), although I would have thought twice about dropping off from the hut to go up Hen Hole :)  I still tend to only go downhill when I have no other option.  Congratulations on missing the bogs on Hen Hole, I didn't think it'd be possible at this time of year :)  Was there no mud at the bealach between The Schil and the Cheviot, just before the hut?  It's usually absolutely dismal around there, you'll have seen the planks laid over the mud to facilitate walking through.  That's where I took one of my absolute favourite pictures I've ever taken:

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7065/6800268652_a8e3f6110e_o.jpg)
(although I wish the crow had been looking the other way; I couldn't bring myself to photoshop it, though)

Bizzle Crags are worth a look; I've just been there once and I climbed up a gully with a waterfall, not sure which one but it was probably the hardest (and dirtiest) scramble I've ever done, praying for handholds of vegetation to support my weight while I pulled myself up :)  The slopes above it go to Braydon Crag which is near the remains of the aeroplane up there.  From there, you can either head straight to the summit or to the other side of Hen Hole from Auchope Cairn.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 06:17:38 PM
I've just booked up to go to the Lakes next month and can't wait for it, it's my second home.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 06:19:15 PM
Where are you staying, and where are you going?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cp40 on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 06:23:31 PM
I've just booked up to go to the Lakes next month and can't wait for it, it's my second home.


 :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 06:26:22 PM
I've got an epic year coming up; a week in Onich at the end of this month, then a couple of nights in Aviemore at the end of April, then four nights in Torridon at the end of June for my 40th, then Skye for a week in July.  Should boost the Munro tally a bit :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 07:23:33 PM
Where are you staying, and where are you going?

I'm staying in Windermere and haven't planned to do anything yet other than going to Riggindale, I'll plan everything in the days before once I know what the weather will be like.  Hardknott Pass is a road I like to do at least once a year and April is good as the traffic isn't usually too bad so I can go a bit daft.  I haven't stayed in Windermere before as I usually go to Ambleside or somewhere away from the towns but walking out to eat and leaving the car behind is appealing.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 07:27:30 PM
I've got an epic year coming up; a week in Onich at the end of this month, then a couple of nights in Aviemore at the end of April, then four nights in Torridon at the end of June for my 40th, then Skye for a week in July.  Should boost the Munro tally a bit :)


I was thinking about going to Skye in July or August but haven't made my mind up yet.  I'm not sure that I fancy the drive or almost losing a day either side just to travel.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 07:34:23 PM
Sounds great Mick, and aye it's good to be able to leave the car when you're going for food.

I've never set foot on Skye before (although seen a lot of it from the tops of mountains in Torridon) so very excited :) I break up the journey either way with a halfway mountain; I'm hoping to get somewhere in Glen Shield going up, and maybe Ben Lui coming back :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 07:45:13 PM
Aye, looks great.  I can walk through your entire route in my head, I love that part of the world (and it's always great to find somebody else having that Cheviot Nordwand revelation, it's a really great looking hill from that side), although I would have thought twice about dropping off from the hut to go up Hen Hole :)  I still tend to only go downhill when I have no other option.  Congratulations on missing the bogs on Hen Hole, I didn't think it'd be possible at this time of year :)  Was there no mud at the bealach between The Schil and the Cheviot, just before the hut?  It's usually absolutely dismal around there, you'll have seen the planks laid over the mud to facilitate walking through.  That's where I took one of my absolute favourite pictures I've ever taken:

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7065/6800268652_a8e3f6110e_o.jpg)
(although I wish the crow had been looking the other way; I couldn't bring myself to photoshop it, though)

Bizzle Crags are worth a look; I've just been there once and I climbed up a gully with a waterfall, not sure which one but it was probably the hardest (and dirtiest) scramble I've ever done, praying for handholds of vegetation to support my weight while I pulled myself up :)  The slopes above it go to Braydon Crag which is near the remains of the aeroplane up there.  From there, you can either head straight to the summit or to the other side of Hen Hole from Auchope Cairn.

No the mud wasn't bad between the The Schil and Auchope/ hut ,certainly easy to work my way around what there was, in fact I found the areas fairly dry by Cheviot standards. Good photo which way is that facing, I'm trying to work out the hills in the background.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 07:49:35 PM
It's the Eildons at Newtown St Boswells, or whatever it's called.  Looking West Northwest I guess.  Not as close as they look, it's zoomed in a fair bit.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 07:53:13 PM
Be aware of the midges in Skye in July/August, they are Tw**s unless you have a building or vehicle to say in.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 08:12:45 PM
Sounds great Mick, and aye it's good to be able to leave the car when you're going for food.

I've never set foot on Skye before (although seen a lot of it from the tops of mountains in Torridon) so very excited :) I break up the journey either way with a halfway mountain; I'm hoping to get somewhere in Glen Shield going up, and maybe Ben Lui coming back :)


The closest I've been to Skye is probably Inverness or Fort Augustus.  I should have made the effort to go further but we had the kids with us and I don't think they would have appreciated it.

The wildlife on Skye is spectacular now and that is probably what will force me to go knowing that the kids can be left to look after themselves.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Wednesday 11 March 2015, 08:14:02 PM
Be aware of the midges in Skye in July/August, they are Tw**s unless you have a building or vehicle to say in.

You can get a hat with a midge net attached for £10, problem solved.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 12 March 2015, 05:51:14 PM
Be aware of the midges in Skye in July/August, they are Tw**s unless you have a building or vehicle to say in.

You can get a hat with a midge net attached for £10, problem solved.

Oh if only it was so easy.......

Looks like Skye is the favoured destination this year, I'm up there during the last two weeks of June on a Caledonian McBrayne island Hopscotch tour on Arran, Islay, Skye, Harris and Lewis 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 14 March 2015, 04:37:55 PM
Inspired by the memory of Bloodybush Edge as discussed over the page, and living just half an hour from Barrowburn in the Coquet Valley, I thought I'd give it a go from that direction this morning.  I've now approached it from most directions and in all honesty, it's still not a one I can reccomend to polite company :)

Parked up at the Trows/Rowhope road end and wandered up the ten or fifteen minutes of road that brings you to where the track branches off for Windy Gyle direct.  Was unusual not to be heading up there, I think this is the first time I've ever used the continuing road (part of the Pennine Cycle Path) as an ascent route.
(http://i.imgur.com/zuB6ZNx.jpg)

The road makes light of the lengthy walk in, it's all very easy and a decent gradient.  Some nice views as well, although this is not one of them :)
(http://i.imgur.com/rqXGE5x.jpg)

This is approaching Hazely Law and one of the most important crossroads in the Cheviots, where Clennell Street (an ancient road between Scotland and England) crosses the road I'm on.
(http://i.imgur.com/yfTKA6W.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/7lmHi7X.jpg)

The view to Shillhope Law from the crossroads.  The path coming down the hill was my descent route (although I just dropped straight off the hill down to it), and is the remains of Clennell Street.
(http://i.imgur.com/TmP7Wzo.jpg)

Uswayford and Bloodybush Edge behind it.  It's not much of a hill :)  Very evocative name, but "fuckingbog lump" would have been a more appropriate choice.
(http://i.imgur.com/4cPhkJA.jpg)

The climb was pathless, boggy, purgatorial and horrific, although mercifully only 200m or so.  Constant battle between feet and bogs to retain possession of my boots.  I've spoilered the images so anybody who has experience of Cheviot bogs won't have to relive the horror :)
Spoiler
(http://i.imgur.com/8mKzIPJ.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/a8fkTca.jpg)

The one thing I will say for the hill is that it's the best place to see how Cheviot and Hedgehope are connected.  These hills are the long walk I did a couple of pages back.
(http://i.imgur.com/Y9uM6Zi.jpg)

Summit trig point with Windy Gyle behind; this is also the best place to appreciate Windy Gyle in its true stature, it's a hill which is hard to get a look at from elsewere in the National Park.  Couldn't be bothered to carry on to Cushat Law, I know the terrain isn't any better and neither are the views :)
(http://i.imgur.com/8wrbtIA.jpg)

Instead, I came back over Yarnspath Law to descend to Clennell Street.  There is a path down in this direction which skirts the forest, and while the path is occassionally good (and definitely better than picking your way through tussocky bogs), it still looks like this a lot of the time.
(http://i.imgur.com/gQb7TKD.jpg)

Windy Gyle and the descent to Clennell Street, and the burn that runs alongside.  A lovely spot on a day with more sun than this one.  Streams in the Cheviots always look black; the water is (usually) very clear but full of suspended peat particles that make it look dark even on a bright day.  Makes it taste funny as well :)
(http://i.imgur.com/zdVwbCp.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/JTKNQtJ.jpg)

All in all, no surprise that it's one of the most infrequently visited tops in the Cheviots given its ultra-remote location and lack of good paths, and I really can't recommend it :)  About 10 miles but not that much ascent, probably around 700m if that.  Would be better on a good day; today wasn't great for pictures under a dull grey sky that constantly threatened rain (which mercifully never came).  Also, it'd be easy to bolt Cushat Law onto the trip and starting here is almost certainly the best way to do it, although longer than the route from Ewartly Shank.  Still, it's always nice to be out and it keeps me in shape for Scotland :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 14 March 2015, 05:13:04 PM
This is approximately the route; I wasn't using GPS or navigating very carefully.  There are fences on Bloodybush Edge which point you in the right direction, but they're not on the 1:50k map.  This is probably not far off, though.  As you can see, Cushat Law isn't far off Bloodybush Edge, and its ascent - and the subsequent reascent of Bloodybush Edge if necessary - aren't particularly hard work

Spoiler for bigness

Spoiler
(http://i.imgur.com/Pwa46va.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Saturday 14 March 2015, 07:32:49 PM
I highly recommend Skye. If you're ever there look up Roger Miket, he's my uncle and knows loads about the history of the place, does tours and things there and is generally a very lovely and incredibly interesting bloke.

What a dreamboat.

(http://www.gefrintrust.org/about/images/roger.jpg)

These are some of the books that he's written about Skye, well worth a look as well.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Books-Roger-Miket/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A266239%2Cp_27%3ARoger%20Miket
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 15 March 2015, 06:16:41 PM
Thanks for posting that OC, looks like I made the right choice last Tuesday. Looks like these hills are for the winter time when there's frost in the ground.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 15 March 2015, 09:05:59 PM

Aye, or after a ten week drought :)  It's still not as bad as Comb Fell but it's certainly cut from the same cloth, which is disappointing as the nearby Windy Gyle isn't anything like as bad, even after monsoon conditions.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Monday 16 March 2015, 01:07:45 AM
(http://i.imgur.com/gUyur1N.jpg)

I went on an epic drive today, culminating at Garden of the Gods. Can't wait to bring my real camera next time.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 18 March 2015, 02:27:12 PM
Off to the Lakes tomorrow morning in my van for three days. It will give the van a going over after the winter slumbers in preparation for the Scottish tour early April. Might take in the hills surrounding High Street, Froswick and Ill Bell on the Thursday, kip in the car park at the top of the Walna Scar road in Coniston and go on the Coniston hills on Friday and then on Saturday take in some of the Grasmere hills and wander over to Pavey Ark/ Harrison stickle overlooking Langdale before heading home :D
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 18 March 2015, 02:41:36 PM

Enjoy.  I'll be at work :anguish:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 19 March 2015, 08:00:16 AM
Some great stuff from OC and SD over the last couple pages.  :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 19 March 2015, 01:42:24 PM
Must admit that i I've been slacking lately due to work commitments and haven't done a decent walk in about 3 weeks. I took the dogs out today and was sweating my tits off, it was boiling. Summers definitely on the way!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 22 March 2015, 11:48:06 AM
Must admit that i I've been slacking lately due to work commitments and haven't done a decent walk in about 3 weeks. I took the dogs out today and was sweating my tits off, it was boiling. Summers definitely on the way!

Keep at it Pedro even an hour a day will work
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Sunday 22 March 2015, 11:53:09 AM
I'm looking for some recommendations from the more well-versed of you on where to go camping towards the end of May. We want to go somewhere with beautiful nature, with forts or castles nearby, perhaps with villages nearby. I imagine Northumberland/Cumbria would be the best bet, but I'd love to read all of your recommendations.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Troll on Sunday 22 March 2015, 12:27:08 PM
I'm looking for some recommendations from the more well-versed of you on where to go camping towards the end of May. We want to go somewhere with beautiful nature, with forts or castles nearby, perhaps with villages nearby. I imagine Northumberland/Cumbria would be the best bet, but I'd love to read all of your recommendations.

If abroad is an option, the Black Forest fits that perfectly.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 22 March 2015, 12:44:55 PM
Went over the Lakes on Thursday morning leaving here at a late leisurely 8am and getting to the parking area opposite Hartsop for 10am, setting off walking at 10.15am. The intention was to walk over Froswick, Ill Bell and Yoke hills normally associated with Kentmere but anybody living our side of the lakes a pain to get to so the option was to walk them from the Hartsop side in a linear walk. Set off and walked through Threshwaite Cove and up to the cove below Stony Cove pike. The normal path goes directly up the scree slopes up Thornthwaite crag/Beacon which are a pain so I doubled back over unpathed grass to the spot height of 710 and then walked onto the Beacon. From there you get a view of the hills of the day. The view is off Froswick at the front, Ill  Bell behind and Yoke behind that. As I was going to return to the same point and didn't want to do the same hills twice I took a path (not marked on the maps) contouring over steep grassy slopes around the first two hills and then walked onto Yoke and then returned over the hills

(http://i.imgur.com/Kzns2mh.jpg?1)

View from Ill Bell towards Thornwaite crag/ Beacon to the left the slopes to High Street to the right.

(http://i.imgur.com/ULRDyiG.jpg?1)


I then walked onto High Street dropping down onto Hayeswater and back to the car park.
The view is off the slopes up to High Street from the north side.

(http://i.imgur.com/a1GnGZJ.jpg?1)

The original plan had been to go to Coniston and camp rough however the Brotherswater inn was only a mile away with its camp site and I could feel the pull of the ale. It turned out to be a fortunate decision as I found I had a flat van battery the next morning requiring the help of the excellent camp site staff to get me going again. I left the van on the site and walked from there going up High Hartsop Dodd in a lung bursting thigh burning climb straight from the roadside of about 800 feet

(http://i.imgur.com/BAI2ZkD.jpg?1)

I then walked along onto Little Hart Crag, Black Brow, Hart Crag and onto Fairfield. The weather was poor, cloudy, wet and with a cold wind of about 30mph, the total opposite of the day before.
The pic is of Cofa pike looking back to Fairfield from St Sundays Crag. The walk continued onto St Sundays Crag and down to Patterdale and back along the valley to Brotherswater. I normally go Gavel pike and Lords seat off St Sundays crag.

(http://i.imgur.com/0Q3jN4j.jpg?1) 

Next day I drove around to Haweswater and parked at the bottom of the valley. I ascended via Gatesgarth pass path and intending to get onto Kentmere Pike made my own path into the unnamed corrie from Adam Seat and onto Brown Howe before getting onto Kentmere Pike. I then returned via the main path onto Harter Fell. The pic is the summit cairn looking south

(http://i.imgur.com/wrE3wq7.jpg?1)

Took a zoom shot of the east side of Helvellyn from the summit. You can see Striding Edge and Swirral edge behind it.

(http://i.imgur.com/l3rVCU8.jpg?1)

The route then take you over a connecting ridge over the Nan Bield Pass to Mardale Ill Bell

(http://i.imgur.com/9bqKvZm.jpg?1)

I continued onto High Street for the second time in three days and dropped down the rib that takes you to Rough Crag. The first shot is of Blea Tarn from the rib. Harter Fell and the route from the top over to Nan Bield pass can be seen in the background

(http://i.imgur.com/HPlWZ31.jpg?1)

View back up to High Street

(http://i.imgur.com/mRk3InT.jpg?1)

Further shot of Blea Tarn

(http://i.imgur.com/p35kSlD.jpg?1)

Finally two shots, first one of Small Water looking onto Haweswater, which is a reservoir for the North west dating back to 1933 when the valley was flooded,from Nan Bield pass and second taken I think in 1996 in  drought conditions

(http://i.imgur.com/dhzY2Zh.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/GX3O0WM.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Sunday 22 March 2015, 12:53:13 PM
I'm looking for some recommendations from the more well-versed of you on where to go camping towards the end of May. We want to go somewhere with beautiful nature, with forts or castles nearby, perhaps with villages nearby. I imagine Northumberland/Cumbria would be the best bet, but I'd love to read all of your recommendations.

If abroad is an option, the Black Forest fits that perfectly.
Unfortunately not, just our fair island at the moment but I'll keep that bookmarked for future reference. :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 22 March 2015, 12:55:04 PM
I'm looking for some recommendations from the more well-versed of you on where to go camping towards the end of May. We want to go somewhere with beautiful nature, with forts or castles nearby, perhaps with villages nearby. I imagine Northumberland/Cumbria would be the best bet, but I'd love to read all of your recommendations.

If abroad is an option, the Black Forest fits that perfectly.

Cant beat the Northumberland coast such as Dunstanburgh and Bamburgh, plenty of  coastal walking/villages/ castles or head over to the Roman wall area

Alternatively Eskdale / Ravenglass have what you want, nature and old forts.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 22 March 2015, 02:09:49 PM

I'm not really a camping expert alas, whenever I've done it it's been proximity to mountains which has been my main concern.  Eskdale and Ravenglass certainly wouldn't disappoint (in the right weather), though.  The view of Eskdale and the Scafells from Hard Knott is pretty much as good as it gets in England.  There are always nagging legality questions about camping in this country, though.

Great shots snoopdawg :thup:  Looks like a good trip.  I've just been around Cushat Law so will do a brief write up of that in a bit, although my pictures will feature considerably fewer rocks :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Sunday 22 March 2015, 03:10:40 PM
Thanks for the suggestions everyone. :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 22 March 2015, 03:40:21 PM
So, Cushat Law.  Big brother (by all of five metres, at 615m) to last week's hill, Bloodybush Edge, to which it's joined by a high level link which I resolutely ignored both times.  Probably more visited than Bloodybush Edge because it's (much) closer to a road end, but still one of the Cheviots' least frequented spots.  I've been up before - it's the closest big hill to my house at a mere 15 miles or so - but never on a good day, which today promised to be.

I don't want to say it's not as boggy as Bloodybush Edge because it had eight days of further drying time since last weekend, but the going was noticeably drier.  What Cushat Law and surrounding hills does have, though, is an abundance of peat hags and holes which are sometimes deep, and will be potentially dangerous for dogs.  Anybody walking here needs to be sure they keep an eye on any dogs/children/whatever that go with them; seriously, the place could be lethal.  I left my dogs at home, which is something I don't do very often.

I should also say that I consider this to be one of those walks that a camera can't do justice to, because the views are so expansive and wide-ranging.  Wide angle shots like these shrink all the detail; the hills surrounding Cushat Law are majestic in their own rounded, bleak, Cheviot-ish way.

This walk gets good before you're even out of the car.  This is my favourite road in Northumberland, from Castle Hill on toward Ewartly Shank
(http://i.imgur.com/rxB7CDq.jpg)

..and you're in the company of high hills and wide open spaces as soon as you get out.  This is just yards from the car, and makes a nice change to starting in a steep-sided valley.  Cushat Law is the ridge on the left of the skyline.
(http://i.imgur.com/BPyCYXf.jpg)

Crossing the marsh in front of the farm was a nightmare.  There was a place which looked for all the world like regular solid earth (grass cover and everything) but which rippled and shook for three or four feet around when any weight was put onto it.  It was like a waterbed.  Never seen anything like it.  If it hadn't been so terrifying, I would have stopped for some video but in reality I just wanted off it as soon as I could.  I decided fairly soon after this that I wouldn't be coming back the same way.

The path leads you directly toward the farmhouses of Ewartly Shank which is always disconcerting.  The finger posts disappeared at the property boundary so I guessed that I needed to skirt the plantation to the left.  This was utterly wrong, and led to a steep descent down a slippery grass slope to the Shank Burn, where I took a quick right and joined up with the good farm road which I had been looking for.  If I was here again, I would just follow the road from the start, not the footpath.

First proper look at Cushat Law from the wrong path.
(http://i.imgur.com/kObAODc.jpg)

Heading toward Little Dod and Shill Moor.  People have their own opinions about tracks like this in wild country, but this is a delight compared to the horrors that came before and will come again.  Shill Moor summit is just 100m above this and 1km away, and could easily be included.
(http://i.imgur.com/QpP8MCZ.jpg)

The view over toward the ridge I'd follow on the way back.  Hogdon Law is the left hand peak, Cushat Law is the right.
(http://i.imgur.com/PBF2H35.jpg)

The path up Cushat Law by the spur of Bush Knowe is generally pretty good with the occasional bog and the tell-tale black edged lines that are hints of peat hags to come (in reality, the peat hags on the route are all avoidable unlike, for example, on Comb Fell).
(http://i.imgur.com/4ICT3Xf.jpg)

The views that open up toward the high Cheviots to the right as height is gained are amazing, I love this place although it's absolutely an acquired taste.  This is one of those "picture can't do it justice" places.
(http://i.imgur.com/i1WHQ97.jpg)

Cushat Law summit cairn and shelter, with the improbably rounded Bloodbush Edge behind.  A most agreeble spot, which is unusual around these parts.  There's even a seat at the end of the shelter.
(http://i.imgur.com/IoFiLgs.jpg)

The route on toward Hogdon Law.  As soon as Cushat Law's summit is left, the terrain takes a turn for the worse again; wet all the way, and with numerous hopeless bogs to cross which sometimes required going out of my way by a couple of hundred metres to find a safe way over.  The ascent toward Hogdon Law is where the holes start to appear in earnest; they're all over the place, and being covered by grass are very easy to miss. 
(http://i.imgur.com/B9yNiiM.jpg)

From this ascent, there's a view which includes all six of the high Cheviot hills - Windy Gyle, Bloodybush Edge, Cushat Law, Cheviot, Comb Fell and Hedgehope.  It looks spectacular, but on a camera is too wide to even consider posting here.  These are the first three.
(http://i.imgur.com/EDzn2Hc.jpg)

Approaching Hogdon Law
(http://i.imgur.com/sP6ZJ5x.jpg)

Cushat Law, Cheviot, Comb Fell (if you know where to look) and Hedgehope from Hogdon Law summit.  It's always unnaturally windy here.
(http://i.imgur.com/cuRLWHU.jpg)

Hogdon Law's summit cairn is a work of art; it looks like a ruined church from a distance. 
(http://i.imgur.com/zGzRup4.jpg)

The cairns on the way down are also very well made; there must have been some bored civil engineers hanging about hereabouts at some time.  This way off the hills drops you virtually back down onto your car, and is a much better option than slogging back up from the Shank Burn on the farm road or the wobbly waterbed footpath.

So, better than I thought it would be, although I would still go with approaching both of these hills from the West despite the considerable extra distance and extra bog.  This was just a little walk, really; six or seven miles with maybe 600m of ascent.  Good practice, though, and a surprisingly good summit after the disappointment of Bloodybush Edge.

Listened to the Metroid Prime soundtrack all the way round since I didn't have dogs.  Surprisingly appropriate for the place :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 22 March 2015, 04:29:14 PM
Edit

Actually, I'd better not post this. But it was to do with snares, and how much more natural and self regulating an ecosystem we could have if foxes just ate what grouse there were rather then breeding and protecting large numbers of them for the purpose of allowing fat knackers to shoot at them.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 22 March 2015, 06:23:51 PM
I'm looking for some recommendations from the more well-versed of you on where to go camping towards the end of May. We want to go somewhere with beautiful nature, with forts or castles nearby, perhaps with villages nearby. I imagine Northumberland/Cumbria would be the best bet, but I'd love to read all of your recommendations.

Beadnell, you have castles and loads of wildlife close by, some of the wildlife is of international importance and Seahouses is within walking distance.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 22 March 2015, 06:29:47 PM
Edit

Actually, I'd better not post this. But it was to do with snares, and how much more natural and self regulating an ecosystem we could have if foxes just ate what grouse there were rather then breeding and protecting large numbers of them for the purpose of allowing fat knackers to shoot at them.


Post it, whatever it is.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 22 March 2015, 06:32:04 PM

It was to do with snares which may or may not have been made safe in the Cushat Law region today :shifty:  They were theoretically free-running so presumably "legal" in that respect, but made with wire that would just cut through a neck before an animal relaxed enough to disentangle itself.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 22 March 2015, 06:36:53 PM

It was to do with snares which may or may not have been made safe in the Cushat Law region today :shifty:  They were theoretically free-running so presumably "legal" in that respect, but made with wire that would just cut through a neck before an animal relaxed enough to disentangle itself.

Free running is legal, they are still a disgusting way to kill an animal. 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 22 March 2015, 06:47:28 PM

Well, unfortunately I got myself tangled up in the thing, it being right next to the track and hidden in deep grass, and I ended up breaking it while I was freeing myself.  You know how it is.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 22 March 2015, 06:55:05 PM

Well, unfortunately I got myself tangled up in the thing, it being right next to the track and hidden in deep grass, and I ended up breaking it while I was freeing myself.  You know how it is.

Unlucky, I've accidently triggered a few spring traps which were designed and positioned to kill animals, by accident, obviously.  If the Tories win the next election we're going to have to get used to avoiding packs of dogs and horses trying to kill foxes again, b******s.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 22 March 2015, 06:57:35 PM

You think?  :anguish:  I thought those f***ers would have gone away by now.  We never see them around here any more, even chasing their "scent trails", and time was that you couldn't get moved for the t***s.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 22 March 2015, 07:01:46 PM

Back to the snares, by the way: I seem to recall reading that the free-running traps were only legal if they were checked daily?  I can say without hesitation that I was the first human being to use that track for at least a couple of weeks and probably more like months.

It was jolly clumsy of me to get myself tangled in that second one as well :rolleyes:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 22 March 2015, 07:02:56 PM

You think?  :anguish:  I thought those f***ers would have gone away by now.  We never see them around here any more, even chasing their "scent trails", and time was that you couldn't get moved for the t***s.

I nearly hit a bloke on a horse one day when I was driving through Leicestershire.  A fox ran out of a hedge and I slowed down to miss it, the fox was followed by about a dozen dogs and then a t*** on a horse come straight over the top about 30 seconds later.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 22 March 2015, 07:05:19 PM

Back to the snares, by the way: I seem to recall reading that the free-running traps were only legal if they were checked daily?  I can say without hesitation that I was the first human being to use that track for at least a couple of weeks and probably more like months.

It was jolly clumsy of me to get myself tangled in that second one as well :rolleyes:

They should be checked daily, believe it or not, and I don't know how this works, they aren't supposed to harm animals.   :idiot2:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 22 March 2015, 07:30:47 PM

Aye, it's horrible.  I must have missed the high-speed ethernet cable which linked the trap to the farmhouse, and the farmer sat waiting for it to go off so he could take his helicopter directly to the spot and humanely destroy the animal within 30 seconds of its capture.

I know it's the way the countryside has always worked, but I f***ing hate it.  Spoiled the walk a bit today (thankfully right at the end).  Was expecting to come across a pile of dead birds around a poisoned dead sheep just to top things off (thankfully have still never seen that; I bet that any gamekeepers pulling that sort of s*** are a bit more careful to clean up after themselves).
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 22 March 2015, 08:38:42 PM
Great trip Snoopdawg. I can't wait to eventually hit the lakes. Same goes for you OC, the Cheviots look like the place to go when you want to feel like the only person alive on Earth. Which is a pretty neat feeling if you ask me.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Monday 23 March 2015, 01:18:45 AM
Great trip Snoopdawg. I can't wait to eventually hit the lakes. Same goes for you OC, the Cheviots look like the place to go when you want to feel like the only person alive on Earth. Which is a pretty neat feeling if you ask me.

What a great feeling it is indeed. Especially when you're so high up.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 27 March 2015, 08:41:58 PM
OC apologies for not responding earlier but the crack quickly went off topic and onto the snares.( not that I'm pro snares) Looked like a good day, you certainly have giving me some ideas for the two hills we discussed. I think will leave for this winter and in fact with the Scottish hills coming up I think winter will be the next time in the Cheviots.

Did you get my comment on your post on walkhighlands regarding the low level rock bands. The lost valley in Glencoe about 3/4 mile off the road has a huge boulder which you can spend a good 1/2 hr on. There's also a small old quarry just off the road on the road down to the clachaig pub. Failing that some beach walks with cliffs might be good.

All who have commented on my lakes walking, thanks.

I've been over today and went to Scafell Pike and Great end from Seathwaite Borrowdale via Styhead tarn. Was accompanied by two lads from Beverley Humberside who approached me at Styhead and after asking where I was going asked if they could tag along. Spent the whole trip with them , good crack. Its an old route up by the corridor route, probably one I've done scores of times but its still good and a good fitness test. Pictures are a bit grey due to the overcast day. Temperature was around freezing on the tops with the wind about 20 mph in the exposed parts. some of the pictures will be probably be duplicates of the last Scafell trip, this time minus snow

Looking up Grains Gill from stockley bridge

(http://i.imgur.com/jPw37Tf.jpg?1)

looking up to Scafell Pike from the Stretcher box at Styhead

 (http://i.imgur.com/Hv5ej3y.jpg?1)

Looking over to Great Gable from the Corridor route on Scafell pike

 (http://i.imgur.com/6hqZzNR.jpg?1)

Looking back to Styhead tarn from up the shoulder onto Scafell pike

(http://i.imgur.com/7FN3rjO.jpg?1)

Looking at Scafell from Scafell pike. The snow filled gully on the  low right is Lords Rake

(http://i.imgur.com/Yh7TZ1g.jpg?1)

Whilst on top of Scafell pike a rescue helicopter did a tour of the tops. One of the lads I was with who was ex RAF reckoned it was just a training exercise.

(http://i.imgur.com/tqTpzgp.jpg?1)

The shoulder of Scafell pike on the path to Broad crag

(http://i.imgur.com/ihkhuLq.jpg?1)

Zoom shot from Great end to Scafell pike

(http://i.imgur.com/aYD4rRW.jpg?1)

Great Gable from the path past Sprinkling tarn

(http://i.imgur.com/8PRKWFp.jpg?1)

Shot on the way down looking back at Scafell pike just as the sun came out for the first time in the day

(http://i.imgur.com/bDJp11v.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 29 March 2015, 06:17:45 PM
OC apologies for not responding earlier but the crack quickly went off topic and onto the snares.( not that I'm pro snares) Looked like a good day, you certainly have giving me some ideas for the two hills we discussed. I think will leave for this winter and in fact with the Scottish hills coming up I think winter will be the next time in the Cheviots.

Did you get my comment on your post on walkhighlands regarding the low level rock bands. The lost valley in Glencoe about 3/4 mile off the road has a huge boulder which you can spend a good 1/2 hr on. There's also a small old quarry just off the road on the road down to the clachaig pub. Failing that some beach walks with cliffs might be good.

Aye, I saw that, thanks :thup:  Was in two minds whether to post it there because I knew people would by default be thinking of recognised crags and really that's not what it's about, it's about finding an amazing environment with safe little rock bands for her to find her way up and down.  Had been thinking about the Lost Valley since I've never been there myself, so maybe that's the one to go for :)  I suspect the lower reaches of the Buachaille might also be appropriate, as long as I keep her off Curved Ridge :)

In other news, I happened upon this picture again today which is one that never fails to inspire me

(http://i.imgur.com/ZVPcgki.jpg)

It's Anatoli Boukreev approaching the Hillary Step on Everest while fixing ropes and, just in case anyone was wondering, it's not one of mine :lol:  I absolutely love the picture, though :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 29 March 2015, 07:27:41 PM
Nice picture

The lost valley is definitely worth a visit, if you don't know the history it,s the one that that the highlanders escaped up in the massacre of Glencoe in  1692. You park up in the big laybys on the road up the glen and initially drop down to the path before climbing up through the trees and boulders. I recall a bridge over the river prior to climbing up. Once entering the valley you are greeted with a sight of a flat valley floor running back for about 3/4 mile and a huge amphitheatre of mountains tops around you. There is a huge boulder , about the size of the bowderstone in Borrowdale just into the valley. Its a worthy 1/2 day.

Have you been down Glen Nevis all the way down to Polludh? There are multitudes of roadside crags. If the rock is wet you can drive onto the road end and walk on for 1/2 mile through the gorge to steal falls and the wire bridge.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 2 April 2015, 06:31:21 PM
Been around one of my favourite areas today (and a recent revelation for snoopdawg), the North side of Cheviot.  I've been up this particular hill by just about every conceivable route now; this one (up Mid Hill just East of Bizzle Crags) is new to me and I'd fancied it for a while as I thought it might give a good view of Bizzle Crags across the corrie.  Apologies for the over-bright pictures; I might fix them up if I can be bothered :)

Parked up at Langleeford; surprisingly busy for a Thursday although the schools are off and we're heading into a Bank Holiday weekend, I suppose.  For all the activity in the car park, I only saw two other people all day; one fell runner in the Dunsdale valley, and one guy eating his dinner at the Cheviot summit cairn.

The path up the Hawsen Burn leading to the Scald Hill / Broadhope Hill col where you drop down into Dunsdale.  It's easy to go wrong at the top here and follow the Chevy Chase route up toward Scald Hill and then the dull and hideous route to Cheviot.
(http://i.imgur.com/MrmdRZQ.jpg)

First proper look at the North side of Cheviot.  A much more interesting hill from this side; it has a terrible reputation largely borne of people slogging up the yards-wide scar on its East flank which is the shortest way to approach it.  If you go up a good hill a crappy way, you have a crappy walk.  There are loads of good ways to get to Cheviot (although all of them feature hideous bogs at some point)
(http://i.imgur.com/9VrTtSP.jpg)

The path drops down to the valley and becomes what looks like an old forestry road.  It splits again at a plantation which is always gloomy and sombre; it starts off making a valiant effort to head into the heart of the woods but very quickly changes its mind amid tangled branches and tunnels that you have to duck through, heading back to the fence at the edge. 
(http://i.imgur.com/eImRIcQ.jpg)

Eventually it drops back through the very edge and leads to the lovely, and quiet, valley of Dunsdale and Goldscleugh. 
(http://i.imgur.com/eY4wF36.jpg)

A nice walk along a twisting and cambered grassy path on a steep hillside above the burn leads to the valley bottom, which is easier going but you need to ignore the fact that you climbed 200 metres up and have now gone back down by almost exactly the same amount.  A quick burn crossing gets you to the private road that runs up the College Valley to Hethpool.
(http://i.imgur.com/m7sABOA.jpg)

As you approach Goldscleugh, the corrie on your left opens up into what looks suspiciously like a rock face.  In the Cheviots.  You've been walking for a while, and you're a bit tired, and you're looking due North into the sun and you think, "well, this must be an optical illusion of some kind".  But it looks a lot like a genuine Scottish or Lake District corrie, with rocks.
(http://i.imgur.com/jHyhzMp.jpg)

A saunter up Mid Hill to the east confirms that it is indeed a rock feature in the Cheviots, and a really quite nice one at that, complete with tumbling and sparkling burn (on the right sort of day).
(http://i.imgur.com/trMGVDQ.jpg)

Turning through 180 degrees confirms that you are absolutely still in the Cheviots, though..
(http://i.imgur.com/ZIAVJIw.jpg)

..as does looking back down the way you came toward Goldscleugh, the College Valley and Newton Tors (the hill on the right).
(http://i.imgur.com/2KxN5Zw.jpg)

It's hard going; there are occasional traces of what might or might not be a human path, but long grass, heather and moss at a 35 - 45 degree slope is mostly the order of the day.  I was properly, properly exhausted when I got to where the angle eases.

Braydon Crag at the top of the cliffs.  The remains of a World War 2 bomber that crashed somewhere around here still emerge from the peat on occasion, if you know where to look.  I don't, and have never had the mental fortitude to go tramping through the peat bogs looking for it.
(http://i.imgur.com/0Id1bCB.jpg)

Presumably this is the Russians having a look around, and flying higher than the aforementioned American bomber
(http://i.imgur.com/sLb54ma.jpg)

The little crag at the top of Mid Hill where it joins Cheviot's peaty north flank.  A tremendous spot for dinner (again, on the right sort of day).
(http://i.imgur.com/2Lrgxon.jpg)

The sting in the tail is the crossing you need to make from the North of the Cheviot summit plateau to the South, if you want to make use of the easy path down (the aforementioned grim scar on the East flank).  It's a nightmare getting across here; a lot of the bogs are hidden in the grass, and you're never sure whether the bog is going to be 100% peaty mud, 100% water, or somewhere between the two.  Dropping up to your knees, or hips, or worse, in a Cheviot bog is an experience never forgotten.  Hips are as deep as I've ever gone, and I've not lost a boot yet.
(http://i.imgur.com/kGRXiCP.jpg)

The grim way down is, of course, the quickest way down.  It has nothing to recommend it as an ascent route other than its proximity to the nearest road end, though.
(http://i.imgur.com/UMlgVFd.jpg)

Mysterious alien activity at the base of Hedgehope?  Our very own Nazca Lines?
(http://i.imgur.com/sBoYUAI.jpg)

A bit too much of this going on today, though.  From the top of Cheviot all the way back down the air smelled of burning heather the whole way.
(http://i.imgur.com/LKjFHT8.jpg)

Great walk, other than the crossing of Cheviot and the descent down that way.  If it hadn't clouded over, I would have headed West when I got to the path and gone down from Cairn Hill and down the Harthope Burn valley to avoid it.  It looked like rain, though, so I just wanted off.  Cheviot is a much better hill (mountain, even) than people give it credit for, if you're prepared to put a bit of effort into finding a good way to get there.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 6 April 2015, 07:09:52 PM
Back in Scotland at last :megusta:

Quick look up Sgor Gaoith today, red hot at the bottom and icy cold on top.  Really should have done a new one but sometimes you just want to revisit an old favourite :)

No pictures until I get back, can't work out how to get them off Instagram and onto here :anguish:

Hoping to get at least one of Beinn Teallach, Beinn a'Chaorinn, Sgurr Thuilm and Sgurr nan Coireachan added, and preferably more or all although that's unlikely :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 10 April 2015, 01:36:45 PM
Didn't climb anything new in the end, spent most of the week with the family (which was a nice change tbh).  So, a couple of random shots from Scotland..

Sgor Gaoith Summit Ridge
(http://i.imgur.com/OfiFKqz.jpg)

Castle Stalker (from Monty Python and the Holy Grail, if you recognise it)
(http://i.imgur.com/gsHEOcd.jpg)

Morning at Loch Leven
(http://i.imgur.com/9VfobiS.jpg)

And again, looking at the Pap of Glencoe
(http://i.imgur.com/nGRCXrc.jpg)

Diabaig road, looking back to Upper Loch Torridon
(http://i.imgur.com/X7oWoI4.jpg)

Glen Nevis
(http://i.imgur.com/JhabXM1.jpg)

Buachaille Etive Mor
(http://i.imgur.com/YXfnPxV.jpg)

I don't take so many pictures these days, I'm beginning to prefer instagram tbh :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 15 April 2015, 01:27:08 PM
Nice shots Open C looks like you had a good time, here's a photo journal of my efforts during a ten day trip.

Travelled up on Thursday 2Nd April and drove to Inveruglas on the shores of Loch Lomond. The target was Ben Vane, a steep little hill ,one of the Arrochar Alps. Made the mistake of not reading up on the route and as the map does not show a path ended up walking up to the Loch Sloy dam and then ascending initially grassy slopes the onto decent snow. Its why I prefer Scotland, you normally end up having to work your own route out.

(http://i.imgur.com/ZKtEneI.jpg?1)

Initially started up having a look at the gullies to the centre left of the crags but the run out below, about 200/ 300 feet below got too much for the first day so I ended up ascending the lower slopes in the middle which were steep enough as it turned out.

(http://i.imgur.com/3CTGJd9.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/NPlYbAG.jpg?1)

Ben Ime from the slopes leading up to Ben Vane

(http://i.imgur.com/gQCVACD.jpg?1)

From the top of Ben vane to show the steepness.


(http://i.imgur.com/UvqdFa7.jpg?1)

Friday 3Rd went onto Beinn Bhuide on a foul day. didn't take any photos due to low cloud and rain. Met a guy on my way up who had turned back, he didn't fancy it as the cloud was so low.

Saturday 4Th had driven around to Loch earn the night before and kipped on the shore along with a few fishermen. The target was Stuc a Chroin which I missed out on 3 years ago as the buttress, the prow had been too iced over. I figured if I walked over the shoulder of Ben vorlich drop into the corrie and then up the shoulder of Stuc a chroin I would avoid it and return by the same route. The photographs show the prow and a corniced edge   

(http://i.imgur.com/V0GcWcn.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/3Zb020B.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/uih68qq.jpg?1)

Saturday night I had driven around to the Ben lawers car park to kip there, got woken up at 6.30am by the good people of Killin who came into the car park to have a easter Sunday service, music blasting and singing for 1/2 hr and then peace returned. As it was such a good morning had an early start to drive around to Invervar to ascend Meall greigh.
The photo is of Bheinn Ghlas from the car park

(http://i.imgur.com/2SuU2I7.jpg?1)

temperature inversion over Loch tay.

(http://i.imgur.com/DogIV8i.jpg?1)

Back of Meall garbh from the path up Meall griegh. the area holds snow for a long time and lends itself to Nordic skiing

(http://i.imgur.com/YKKAFQQ.jpg?1)

looking into the corrie below ben Lawers from Meall griegh

(http://i.imgur.com/T0w749L.jpg?1)

Had driven around to Bridge of Orchy on Sunday night and kipped behind the hotel. Drove around to achallader farm on Monday 6th morning. Initially the plan was to ascend up the corrie from the car park and do Bheinn Mhanach and then return to Beinn Achaladair and then Beinn a Chreachain, however got onto the shoulder of Beinn Achaladair and didn't fancy the steep wet snow slopes that traversed the shoulder across to Beinn Mhanach so went up Beinn Achaladair instead

(http://i.imgur.com/2tWqGkl.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/dbGoAoc.jpg?1)

The view across to Beinn a Chreachain from Beinn Achaladair

(http://i.imgur.com/WmRJSM7.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/VFV2i6D.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/BhNHCva.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/8QwfXXx.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/76QGDH4.jpg?1)

Beinn Achaladair from below, a huge hill it and its neighbour often referred to as "the wall of Rannoch". the second shot is slightly out due to looking directly into the sun when taking it.

(http://i.imgur.com/4MLJ3mJ.jpg?1)


(http://i.imgur.com/l1lEx0T.jpg?1)

That night I drove around to Glen etive and slept in the glen. Tuesday 7th. Walked up to the col between Ben starav and Ghlas Bheinn mhor and went onto Bheinn Nan aighenan. The return to the col is by the same route, by this time I think the previous days walking was taking its toll and I felt knackered and sat on the col for 1/2 hr before continuing onto Ghlas Bheinn Mhor
(http://i.imgur.com/FupZEJZ.jpg?1)

shot back to Ben starav

(http://i.imgur.com/eqV5hmX.jpg?1)


Middle top of Bheinn Ghlas Mhor

(http://i.imgur.com/kpHUOJg.jpg?1)

another shot back to Ben starav

(http://i.imgur.com/R18mh1o.jpg?1)

Route off Bheinn Ghlas mhor

(http://i.imgur.com/r5r0xbr.jpg?1)

Corniced top of Stob coir an albannaich

(http://i.imgur.com/2GtTuVs.jpg?1)

Following two shots are the snowy ridge descent towards Meall Nan Eun.

(http://i.imgur.com/oQA5RFK.jpg?1)


(http://i.imgur.com/6ysyKQf.jpg?1)

Zoomed shot of Buachaille mor from Meall Nan Eun

(http://i.imgur.com/artZoM6.jpg?1)

Back of Buachaille Etive Beag from Glen Etive. The total route ended up being 15 miles, 4 munroes and a time of 11 hours spent on the hills. was rather knackered so had a rest day, driving up to Fort William to stay on the site in Glen Nevis.

(http://i.imgur.com/854SKkq.jpg?1)

Shot of the Buachaille from the road side 

(http://i.imgur.com/x0g4nK8.jpg?1)

After having the Wednesday off drove up Newtonmore area and onto Garva Bridge and went up Geal Charn, an easy 4 hr walk

(http://i.imgur.com/6XrefpD.jpg?1)

Corniced edge from Geal Charn.

(http://i.imgur.com/opA3vUI.jpg?1)

Drove around to Newtonmore that night and drove the van up Glen Banchor to park up for the night. Its a good spot with scenic views across to Feshie and once the local dog walkers disappear very quiet. On Friday 10 th went up the estate path towards a Chailleach. The first two hills are easy, grassy and very rounded. Took this photo of a des res bothy on the way up

(http://i.imgur.com/oQDSpCc.jpg?1)

The path first goes onto A Chailleach and then drops down and back up onto Carn Sgulain. The photo is Carn Sgulain. From there an easy 4 mile ridge continues along virtually all the way at 3000 feet until you ascend Carn Dearg. Back to the vehicle is a 12 mile walk

(http://i.imgur.com/CA1WKKR.jpg?1)

Carn Dearg

(http://i.imgur.com/TBqubY8.jpg?1)

Corniced edge on the descent from Carn Dearg

(http://i.imgur.com/CNJPK9N.jpg?1)

All in a great trip, had 8 days walking, including two big days and on 14 munros, 1 of which I had been on before. The total is now 220 so hopefully I'll see the rest off in the next couple of years. Apart from 1 day definitely had the best of the weather, when I left it was snowing down to about 400 feet and the wind gusting to 50 mph. Onto May 1st when I'm back!


Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Deuce on Wednesday 15 April 2015, 01:38:20 PM
:thup: great pics, guys.


Found out that I'll be living in Chilean Patagonia until December, buzzing. Great opportunity for some world-class hiking and sight-seeing.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 April 2015, 06:00:30 PM

Great stuff snoopdawg :thup:  And aye, closing in on 50 to go must be a good feeling.  Which ones that you have left are you most, and least, looking forward to?

:thup: great pics, guys.


Found out that I'll be living in Chilean Patagonia until December, buzzing. Great opportunity for some world-class hiking and sight-seeing.

Sounds tremendous :thup:  Get some pictures in here :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 15 April 2015, 08:07:00 PM
Not done enough around the affric ,mullardoch ,strathfarrar areas so will be looking to get into those areas in a summer 5 backpack. The least favourite would undoubtedly be the inn pinn which I probably have to hire a guide for a day
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 15 April 2015, 08:34:16 PM
I suspect I will never climb it, alas.  Going to Skye in the summer and even setting eyes on it might be enough.  The only ones I speculatively have planned are Blabheinn and Bruach na Frithe, don't think I'm ready for the ridges just yet :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 17 April 2015, 09:48:30 AM
Was on Skye in July 2013 on an CalMac island hopscotch tour with the van. It was 1983 since I'd last been there and to be honest I wish I hadn't left it so long. I did Blaven on the last trip not having done it before. Parked the van in the car park at the foot of the hill on the Loch Slapin side and slept there overnight. Moved the van during the day as the other half who doesn't do hills was staying with the van and doing a bit of sunbathing and I went up on my own on a scorching day. My memories of Skye are not of scorching days so it felt unusual. The path is straightforward and as its gabbro does not have much growth on it so is very rocky. After the summit I did the south top as well and dropped down the south shoulder to rejoin the main path. Enjoy it, it is a straightforward walk with a top rock section of about 150 feet and 35 degree angle where you pick your way through the rocks to the top. Pick a clear day if you can, the views out to Rhum and other islands are stunning and across to the main ridge. Heres a couple of pics taken during the day. The third one is of the connecting ridge to Clach Glas which the main path does not go on.

Car park at the foot of Blaven looking at Clach Glas

(http://i.imgur.com/Wkh9nby.jpg?1)

Blaven from the road around Loch slapin

(http://i.imgur.com/q4GZDqv.jpg?1)

Clach Glas ridge

(http://i.imgur.com/G6zsdXI.jpg?1)

I haven't been on Bruach na frithe since the early 1980,s and haven't got any photographs of the hill itself. Certainly it is known as the only hill in the cuillin that you can walk onto easily. If you've got all day it would be worth while wandering over to Coire a Bhastier and having a look at sgurr nan gillean, am Bastier and Pinnacle ridge 

(http://i.imgur.com/jLd9ej8.jpg?1) 

Time dependent Coire lagan is worth a look and Sgurr alisdair can be ascended up the laborious path up the stone shoot or up into Coire a ghrunda where a thin ridge path but doable goes over to Sgurr nan Eag at the end of the main ridge. Both coire,s share the same approach path from glenbrittle   
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Northerngimp on Friday 17 April 2015, 09:58:26 AM
Great pics, i got some stuff from Whistler and Blackcome mountains in Canada but its all just ski areas.  No thing realli isolated or remote.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 18 April 2015, 06:44:10 PM
Cheers Snoopdawg, that's useful :thup:  I'd been worrying about how much pathless rock was at the top of Blabheinn.  And Northerngimp: just post them, man.  Ski areas are still the great outdoors.  Loads of my pictures are taken within 5 metres of my car :lol:

Did my 100% absolute top favourite Cheviots walk today to try out the new camera; a circumnavigation of Cheviot itself featuring no summits but a great route, about 14 miles of walking and more than 1,000m of ascent.  I posted the proper trip report on walkhighlands but a couple of pictures for NO (please note, I'm trying to get away from spending so much time fannying about with photos so these have the very basic lightroom treatment and aren't even cropped or straightened).

Lola, just after setting off and after she ran away from an adder.  Circumnavigation part one, the valley of the Hawsen Burn to the East of Cheviot.
(http://i.imgur.com/R1tF7zA.jpg)

Lambden Valley.  circumnavigation part two, the Northern valley.
(http://i.imgur.com/kn6blH0.jpg)

North side of Cheviot :aww:
(http://i.imgur.com/ExSi68u.jpg)

Bizzle Crags, where I went last time
(http://i.imgur.com/4C8HxGf.jpg)

Looking back down the College Valley. Circumnavigation part three, the Western valley.  This is the one that you have to work hard to climb out of; the rest of them are easy.
(http://i.imgur.com/GPn5O2I.jpg)

Hen Hole
(http://i.imgur.com/AQLNQP7.jpg)

Mountain Refuge Hut at Mounthooly, featuring Matteson's Smoked Pork Sausage
(http://i.imgur.com/hNiWt0R.jpg)

Cheviot summit plateau ambience
(http://i.imgur.com/FUqf7bj.jpg)

Circumnavigation part four, looking back to the Harthope Valley to the South, which is a pain in the arse to walk down but strangely enjoyable
(http://i.imgur.com/Yt3o4KA.jpg)

Took six and a half hours, I'm goosed.  Pleased that I appear to be able to remember how to use an SLR, though :)

Spoiler
(http://i.imgur.com/5TMarqw.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 19 April 2015, 09:50:25 AM
Good walk OC , enjoyed reading the trip report on walkhighlands. The Cheviots and the grass particularly the shot of Bizzle crags looks quite dry??
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 April 2015, 10:41:01 AM

Aye, it's not bad up there at the minute.  Not so great that I'd like to tackle Comb Fell or Bloodybush Edge but certainly I've seen it considerably worse in April than it is now :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 26 April 2015, 04:56:55 PM
Just back from a couple of days with a friend of mine, in Torridon on Friday and the Cairngorms yesterday.  Torridon first.

The forecast was the most uncertain I've ever read, with lurking low pressure to the North and South of the area threatening rain and snow and gale force winds.  We had originally planned a leisurely trip up to Aviemore where we were staying, a little Cairngorms wander on the Friday then a big day in Torridon on the Saturday but given the forecast we decided on an early start and do Torridon on the Friday.  So out of bed at twenty to four aiming to reach Torridon (300 miles away) by around midday and only do one of the munros on Beinn Alligin rather than the traverse of both that we'd originally planned.  The trip up the new and safe A9 was a bit of a delight, actually, and we got there on schedule to find that while the Cairngorms had been shrouded in cloud over around 800m, the West coast mountains were clear, although under a menacing dark grey sky.

Torridon; Beinn Alligin is the mountain to the left.
(http://i.imgur.com/buqFxTm.jpg)

Parked up and ready to go, you can assess fairly well from the carpark how steep the route is going to be.  The actual distance involved in this walk is tiny, but the relentless ascent makes it a slow and steady pull.  The first part of the route heads straight up a crag toward a levelling where the top of the mountain sits.  Very steep, very rough, but good scrambling practice in a non-exposed situation.

At the top of the initial pull, the ground levels out and the path heads straight for the corrie which twists up into the mountain and leads directly to the top of this first munro.  At this point, the views toward the other Torridon munros start to get a bit more special as well.

Beinn Eighe
(http://i.imgur.com/82GLhsv.jpg)

Liathach
(http://i.imgur.com/Se2YJPY.jpg)

The route ahead
(http://i.imgur.com/8faaw5s.jpg)

The corrie is ever-steepening and rough, and hemmed in by towering rock walls but it's a safe way up, as long as you're careful not to put your feet on anything too loose.  The course of the burn in the corrie has altered due to a rockslide, it's now running over grass and into a new channel which has been carved out.  There was still snow lying in here but far less than I'd seen when I was here two or three weeks ago.

Snow in the corrie.  The skyline is virtually the top of the mountain and feels very close but is still around 300m higher than I was here.
(http://i.imgur.com/9pb71K2.jpg)

Pulling out of the top of the corrie feels amazing, with the views back to where you start really opening up.  On a clear day, you can see for miles and out to the islands of Skye and the Outer Hebrides.  On a miserable day, it still looks pretty good.
(http://i.imgur.com/BxoPF7h.jpg)

My mate hasn't got the best head for heights so I warned him about the drop-off in advance; there's nothing that prepares you for the first view over the edge of this mountain, and although pictures still look good, the scale of the place is unbelievable.  It was fairly clear that he wouldn't have been up for the complete traverse even if we'd arrived earlier in the day so I'm pleased we did it this way.  This is my favourite summit (so far) and the view from the other high points on the ridge aren't as good as this one.

Tom na Gruagaich summit view, with the other munro of Beinn Alligin to the left and the "horns" on from that
(http://i.imgur.com/6XVkSTU.jpg)

Great day, the only disappointment was that we arrived at the Torridon Inn before they started serving food :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 26 April 2015, 05:22:11 PM
The day on Cairn Gorm was one of epic spindrift, deep powdery snow and huge mugs of coffee at 1,100m surrounded by attractive female skiers and snowboarders who will not have been impressed at our weatherbeaten and bedraggled looks :)  There's not really a report to write and the weather was too poor for many pictures, but this is a quick version of the day.

Meall a'Bhuachaille from the ski road
(http://i.imgur.com/1Rpm6Ak.jpg)

Cairn Gorm area under new snow
(http://i.imgur.com/5vb6I0Y.jpg)

A rare shot of your brave correspondent enjoying conditions approaching the top of Cairn Gorm, just before the wind created near whiteout and forced a turnaround when we heard the whistles and buzzers from below to get the ski crowd to safety
(http://i.imgur.com/Q2BULzs.jpg)

Epic snowstorm approaching as we descended.  It reached us about ten minutes before we got to the car, and I will be forever grateful that it didn't reach us higher on the mountain.
(http://i.imgur.com/5ym1zFZ.jpg)

Two very different days, both around four or five hours, for my mate who isn't a massively experienced walker.  I'm pleased he got to experience what were almost full winter conditions (missing only hard, iced snow) on what's probably the safest munro to experience them, though :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 26 April 2015, 08:25:13 PM
Love the torridon shots oc, beinn alligan is on the must revisit list,it's been too long since I've been on it.I,m impressed with your determination in driving big distances for short trips.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 26 April 2015, 08:30:32 PM
Yeah, this trip was more for my mate this time, since I'd promised to introduce him to those two areas for a while. I would've headed further had I been on my own (was looking enviously over to Beinn Liath Mor and Maol Chean Dearg which are the one I really want to do over there) but sometimes an easy day with good company and a few beers is enough :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 27 April 2015, 01:52:10 PM
OC I'm up in Fort William from this Friday on the Cape wrath trail. Granted that the weather can and does change frequently,  can you give me an idea of the air temperature at glen level that you experienced on the weekend?

I thought I had settled on choice of clothing which as I am backpacking is crucial but the recent change of weather has me concerned as my choice of route takes me away from civilisation for days on end sometimes up to 6 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 27 April 2015, 02:05:41 PM

The weather was just on the change when we were on the West coast and still relatively warm at glen level; I climbed most of Beinn Alligin in just a technical t-shirt and only needed a thin windproof above around 800m).  I suspect it's a lot colder over there this week.  We were on the wrong side of the country for you when the anticipated cold air finally arrived on Saturday; given the windchill and the snowfields the Cairngorms were, I think, the coldest I've ever known them (which is saying something) and in Aviemore I'd say it was around 8 - 10 degrees through the day but still feeling quite warm if the sun appeared.  I suspect tha the majority of the cold we felt was from wind out of the North rather than air temperature, and the cold air looks to have well and truly settled up there now so my guess is that it'll be colder for you than it was for us.

Which way are you heading..?  I'm guessing up through Ardgour / Morar / Knoydart way if you're away from civilisation for that long..?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 27 April 2015, 04:47:39 PM
Thanks for that info.

My route is to from Fort William, walk up the Great Glen to Clunes, continue on towards Kilfillan ,through Glengarry, over to Claunie from Poulary, to Altbeithe YH and Glen Affric and via Gleann Gniomhaidh and Loch a Bhealaich, up to Iron Lodge to Maol Bhuidhe bothy, Strathcarron, Torridon via Coulags and Bealach ban, Kinlochewe via the back of Beinn Eighe, Strath na Sealga, Inverleal, Oykel bridge, Loch Ailsh, Glendhu, Glencoul, Ben Dreavie, Lochstack, Rhiconnich, Blairmore, Sandwood bay, Cape Wrath.

I've got a room booked at Kinlochewe Hotel on the 7th night, there's also a shop where I can restock. Other hotels that I will pass en route will be at Claunie, Strathcarron, Oykel bridge and Kinlochbervie if I need them. There's also an opportunity to divert to Ullapool if required. Other than that its camping or bothy.

I had thought about Knoydart, via Sourlies and Barrisdale but I've been that way scores of times and know that's its a fair effort to get to Sheil Bridge and didn't want to be knackered too early, wanted to give the Falls of Glomach a miss, been that way with a full pack once coming upover and didn't like it at all, Its really the only place that I've truly felt exposure, wanted to include Coire Fionnaraich area from Cuolags, and Torridon and if I feel well might give Ullapool a miss and go via Glen Douchary.

Its roughly about 200 miles and I've given myself 19 days to complete and get transport back to Aviemore from where I've got a train booked on the 21/05/2015.

when I was in Scotland early April I was experimenting with combinations of tops. Obviously the waterproof is a given and I was going to take a Montane windshirt which can be worn either with a Helly Hansen polyester top or a breathable t shirt dependent on temperature. On top of that I've just bought a Rab vapour rise gilet. I've always shied away from Gilet,s in the past as I didn't fancy the cold arms bit but I've worn it around the doors and found it quite warm. On top of that I've a mountain equipment micro fleece for cold evenings. That was the initial plan. If I have to carry fallback gear for freezing days it would be either a Patagonia jacket or Montane Prism or Flux. Obviously weight and packing are crucial so they all cant go.

Time will tell how it goes, I did try last September but a combination of bad footwear, lack of fitness and heavy winds knocked it back . The reason I chose May is because the weather is generally more settled and warmer however the recent turn is worrying however I'm away long enough for it to turn around again   
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 27 April 2015, 04:59:06 PM

Amazing route, sounds brilliant :thup:  I stayed in the B&B south of Kinlochewe at Cromasaig once, the bloke was really enthusiastic about the Cape Wrath trail, and particularly the Giving Ullapool A Miss idea :)  He'd be delighted that people are doing it.  That little shop in Kinlochewe is an absolute godsend in that part of the world :lol:

Not sure how I'd approach the gear question on a walk like that where presumably you're keeping the all but the essential ups and downs to a minimum.  I get away with it quite easily because I get hot when I walk so usually on ascent I can get away with a fairly thick wicking base layer and just a very light windproof; then for the downhills can add the bigger and warmer jacket.

I know the big report will rightly go on Walk Highlands but would love to see an abridged version (if necessary; I'd read the whole thing) on here as well :thup:  And good luck, if you don't post in here again before you head off :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 27 April 2015, 05:09:27 PM

Which rivers will you have to cross to do it that way, btw..?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 27 April 2015, 05:36:27 PM
Thanks for that, I've tried to do the map on walkhighlands already but the software gives up after a while!

I think the bloke at Kinlochewe you mention is Tom Forrest who has Cromasaig. He also used to have a mountaineering shop in the old garage in Kinlochewe called MORU and I think he has a hand in the current shop. I think he was one of the original persons pushing the trail and still runs a website http://www.capewrathtrail.co.uk/foreward.htm. I don't claim to know him just things I've picked up along the way.

In relation to rivers I think I will be quite fortunate in that respect. I do carry a pair of crocs for river crossings. I've done a lot of planning and chosen areas that I can access bridges but might struggle in the areas leading to Shenavall and around Lochstack towards Rhiconich
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 27 April 2015, 05:47:35 PM

Aye, that's the guy.  He was really passionate about it, was great to meet him.  Next time I tried to book with them, I got an email back about six months later saying sorry and their email had been hacked but please don't forget about us :)  Epic breakfasts as well, and you just ate with him and his wife and talked about mountains which was cool, and different :)

I have nightmares about being stuck on the wrong side of the Abhainn Strath na Sealga, only seen it once when I was on An Teallach but it looked like the Red Sea :lol:  It had rained for about three years before that, though, so I assume sometimes it's just a normal river :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 27 April 2015, 06:01:42 PM
It takes careful planning and a bit of luck to avoid major river crossings. I find it much easier with a walking pole and crocs. Hopefully the current weather wont provide too much snow melt as I did see the effect of that in early April. The route does via the Abhainn Strath na Sealga but thankfully I'll be on the right hand side bank and hopefully wont need to cross. The ground northwards from Maol Bhuide bothy might be interesting as there is no path up to the shoulder of Ben Dronaig, it goes straight over boggy ground until you hit the path around Loch Calavie
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 27 April 2015, 06:44:35 PM
I've only ever done it once on a short morning-killing walk up to Seanna Mheallan in Torridon.  I only did the walk to practice crossing a river (although really it's just a burn; just above the waterfall above the Ling Hut) and walking on completely pathless terrain.  Boots and gaiters were enough to just splash through that day but I remember not enjoying it a great deal and thinking if a river was much wider it might be enough to turn me around.  I've never really checked but I'm guessing there are more than a few Munros where a crossing is unavoidable no matter which route you take.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 27 April 2015, 07:41:53 PM
Cant think I've had too many problems with river crossings when ascending hills, Monadh mor in the Cairngorms springs to mind when ascending from Glen Feshie when the snow felt had enlarged the outflow from Loch nan Stuirteag causing me to walk up river for a good mile before finding a collapsed snowbridge enabling me to cross. But for finding that I think I would have turned back as the flow was too fast.

its usually backpacking when I've found problems. Its mainly the cairngorms I'm thinking of, the Geldie burn when coming up from Glen tilt springs to mind as does the fords of Avon which in normal conditions is just a plodge across but in spate its a different matter
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 29 April 2015, 09:12:20 PM
Is it legal to sleep in your car, as long as you're not drunk, and as long as you're parked safely and legally?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Wednesday 29 April 2015, 09:13:29 PM
Yes.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 29 April 2015, 09:17:30 PM
Well that's good news :) and coming from an authoritative source as well :thup:  Cheers. 

Never been 100% but I guess police advice is usually to get some sleep if you're tired.  Will commence the car sleeping in a week or two, I think, see how it feels compared to camping since I never ventured far from the road with a tent anyway.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Wednesday 29 April 2015, 09:20:14 PM
It feels f***ing horrible but then so does camping iyam.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 29 April 2015, 09:27:05 PM
It feels f***ing horrible but then so does camping iyam.
I've done it in a seated position which was awful but now I'm nearly 40 I am in possession of an old man style estate car which I can just about stretch out in, so it might be easier :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Wednesday 29 April 2015, 10:56:10 PM
Oh you might get woken up because the police think you're drunk, though to be honest if you're in a remote area it's unlikely to be a problem.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 30 April 2015, 04:01:56 PM
Is it legal to sleep in your car, as long as you're not drunk, and as long as you're parked safely and legally?

Absolutely, do it all the time in my van and usually have a few beers as well.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 30 April 2015, 07:37:54 PM
Any problems with condensation or do you just leave a window open and damn the midges?  And I keep reading that if you have a drink but keep the keys inside you can be done for drunk in charge if not drink driving :anguish:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Monday 4 May 2015, 07:50:04 PM
Anybody on here use any decent Android apps when they go out walking? Looking for something to help me on specific routes that I'm not too familiar with when out.

I know OpenC is probably old school and uses paper. ;)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 4 May 2015, 08:00:26 PM
I use paper and compass, and dedicated GPS, and Memory Map on android :)

I previously used viewranger which is brilliant and which allows downloading of free topographic maps (although not Ordnance Survey ones, which you have to pay for).  Well worth a look :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Monday 4 May 2015, 08:04:48 PM
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.pp&hl=en_GB
This Galileo offline map app got me round Cuba on my bike 2J. Records where you are going too which is great. You just search for a map of where you going through the app, and it takes it then it's good to go.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Monday 4 May 2015, 08:32:35 PM
Cheers man. :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 13 May 2015, 08:29:58 PM
First of all, unbelievable stuff from OC and SD on the last few pages.  :o

Second, I finally made it to the Lakes! After over a month of very little exercise including a 2 week holiday where I just drank and ate s**** and put on half a stone, me and wor lass went and did Catbells like yous suggested and it was brilliant! The weather was perfect and parking was a nightmare and we did a little over 7km in about 3 hours. The look on her face when we climbed that first rocky bit only to realise that we werent at the top! :lol:

To be honest going down hurt my legs more. Is that normal? All in all a class day (I won't bother posting any shitty phone pics) can't wait to go back! 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 13 May 2015, 08:33:34 PM
Weyyyy, well done man :thup:  Catbells is a brilliant first fell, small enough to be safe but steep and rocky enough to feel like a challenge.  Post the pictures, damn it :thup:

If you're in the mood for something higher, I can recommend Blencathra or Great Gable as bigger but not epic days.  Have a look at both and I'm sure we can come up with some routes for you :)  A lot of people have more bother on the way down; really hammers the joints as opposed to the muscles/fitness.  Personally, I find up and down equally difficult but in different ways :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 13 May 2015, 08:55:52 PM
Haha cheers OC, I bet it feels like mission accomplished for you lol. Yeah it was a class day out and has wet the apetite. As soon as we reached the Lakes I instantly recognised Blencathra and then when I looked at Sharp Edge I nearly s*** me duds tbh :lol:. It is definitely on the agenda in the near future.

OK, here's a few shitty phone pics. The weather was much better than it looks and I even got a little sunburn!

(http://s13.postimg.org/xnqptn25j/20150513_144454.jpg)


(http://s1.postimg.org/4b0y0595r/20150513_144355.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 13 May 2015, 09:03:22 PM
Aye, looks like a great day :) all you want is cloud level above the summits, blue skies are an extra bonus but sometimes mean too hot.  Good pictures too :thup:

Yeah, Blencathra is unmistakable as the first big hill you come to going in the northern way.  Sharp Edge looks even worse up close :lol: my favourite route on the mountain goes around it, rather than up it, and is easier than what you did on catbells (although almost twice the ascent, I think).
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Wednesday 13 May 2015, 09:31:29 PM
Yeah Cheers mate I believe you already outlined the route for me earlier in the thread. What would be the next 5 that I should do from now?

Back to Catbells, I couldn't believe some of the people out there. One woman must have been 70 odd and cracking on as if nowt was the matter. It kind of shamed wor lass into doing the last bit. :lol: There was also some bloke with a new born baby strapped to his back. Thought that was a bit weird mind.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 14 May 2015, 05:13:11 AM
Assuming you're sticking with the Lakes for now (which you should - the Cheviots won't feel dramatic enough for you now, and Scotland is a long way away), in order of difficulty and seriousness I would go with:

Blencathra, the way I described; technically easier than Catbells and not massively longer, but with a lot more ascent.  No danger, occasional loss of path.
(http://www.grough.co.uk/lib/img/editorial/blencathra1200.jpg)

Green Gable and Great Gable; a bit scrambly and with a bit more sense of exposure than you had on Cat Bells but no real danger.  Also quite a bit longer and with quite a lot of ascent.  There's an escape route down from the bealach/col between Green and Great Gable if the final ascent looks too intimidating.
(https://gtphotographs.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/great-gable2.jpg)

Scafell Pike by Grains Gill; a long day but the best way to approach Scafell Pike.  Ups and downs on the summit ridge will also test mental strength which is massively important.  You can vary the return and come back by the Corridor Route which is a more scenic way to do it but harder.  You can also add Great End to the day for not much extra effort, since it's on the Scafell summit ridge.  Picture shows the whole summit ridge from Great End to Scafell Pike.  The path joins it at the first dip after Great End.
(http://www.alanwaters.org.uk/photos/77_great_end/8_Ill_and_Broad_Crags_and_Scafell_Pike_summit_from_.jpg)

High Crag, High Stile and Red Pike from Buttermere or Gatesgarth; the best ridge walk in the Lakes IMO, and always quiet once you get away from the Haystacks path.  Steep ascent and descent will get you used to more difficult, unsteady and steep terrain.  This would be my pick of the five; it feels like Scotland, albeit a little version.  This is a great day :thup:
(http://www.lakedistrictwalks.com/wallpaper/high_stile_wallpaper.jpg)

Crinkle Crags and Bowfell from Great Langdale; a really long day by Lake District standards, with a couple of routefinding problems and the option of going over the famous (but not that hard) Bad Step, which can be bypassed if you prefer.  Very satisfying walk, and ends at a pub :)
(http://www.stridingedge.net/old/images/2011/07.%20July/14.07.11%20-%20Pike%20o%20Blisco/14.07.11-080_l.jpg)

Until you get used to the terrain and start to feel that you have a head for navigation, be careful in iffy weather.  There are good paths all along most of these walks, but there are places (the Gables, Scafell Pike, certainly the very quiet High Stile Ridge) where the path can run out and if the mist is down it can start to feel very serious indeed.  Pick a good day :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Thursday 14 May 2015, 06:06:42 AM
Still waiting for the snow to get out of most of the mountains here. :(
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Thursday 14 May 2015, 10:10:26 AM
Thanks for the guide OC. The next one is definitely going to be Blencathra. The ridge walk you mentioned from Buttermere I'm sure I saw a video on YouTube of some guy doing that and it looked amazing.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Thursday 14 May 2015, 11:36:27 AM
You're gonna hate me here. I live literally minutes from where many of them pics were taken and they interest me not one jot. Each to their own though boys I hope you all have fun.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 14 May 2015, 06:40:16 PM
You're gonna hate me here. I live literally minutes from where many of them pics were taken and they interest me not one jot. Each to their own though boys I hope you all have fun.

Why would we hate that?  I can't imagine anything worse than living over there and not liking the mountains, what the f*** else do you do?  :pow:

Nah, I often find the Lakes pretty dull myself to be honest.  Spoiled by going to the big mountains North of the border; it all feels a little bit small scale to me when I head over that way these days, alas.  I still like it when I'm there but I very rarely go any more.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Saturday 16 May 2015, 10:07:08 PM
We mostly just drink and watch football on TV. Then go to work and argue about the football on TV.

I have done most of the bigger walks but once was enough, it's just not for me. And the tourists wind me up something chronic. This isn't meant as a dig at anyone but we call them "hill w*****s", the type of people you see walking round Buttermere with walking poles and all the North Face gear. Seriously you can walk round Buttermere in flip flops yet tthese clowns drive up from Cheshire ever weekend thinking they're scaling Everest.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 16 May 2015, 10:36:39 PM
:) I agree, and that's why I never come to your towns :lol:  people clacking around the streets with poles and the sort of boots I keep for ten hour days in steep and frozen snow is a bit weird but tbh your part of the world would maybe be in a s*** state without them.

Scotland is a much more convivial experience because there's nobody else around.. and because the mountains are orders of magnitude more impressive, of course.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Sunday 17 May 2015, 12:25:25 AM
I've been to Keswick maybe three times in the last 15 years, and it's about ten miles away. The place is just jam packed with w*****s. Even Cockermouth which can barely even claim to be in the Lake District is off limits through summer.
The people who wind me up more than anyone however are The Friends of the Lake District, not one of them actually lives here! And the anti-nuclear arseholes don't even get me started on them.

Christ I must sound like Victor Meldrew. Anyway it's a lovely part of the world and you're all very welcome to visit if hills and ponds float your boat. But it's not Nepal so you don't need to set up base camp anywhere or bring huskies.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 17 May 2015, 07:25:47 AM
The thing is, you just need to look in Scotland to see what happens to places like yours when there's not that tourist infrastructure; somewhere like Kinlochewe, with scenery immeasurably grander than yours, but there's just nothing there.  The place is deserted in comparison to the lakes and as such the only real money there comes from landowners exploiting shootable wildlife, which you can't really do.  Long may it stay that way - the lack of tourists (and, dare I say it, the lack of intolerant locals - nee offence like) is part of what makes it great for me.

Keswick and Ambleside would be in danger of declining massively imo, with the majority of the kids being forced to move away for economic reasons, if you didn't have your w***** tourists.  You can't all make a living cutting each others' hair :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 17 May 2015, 08:01:05 AM


it's not Nepal so you don't need to set up base camp anywhere or bring huskies.

:lol: this is true :) again, though, your outdoor shops bring a lot of commerce that you might not otherwise get, so to some extent you should just grit your teeth and let them get on with it :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 17 May 2015, 11:15:03 AM
OC, got Blencathra tentatively penciled in for next weekend, weather permitting of course. Am I becoming a hill w*****?  :D

Better than being a bus w***** I suppose! :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 17 May 2015, 11:41:43 AM
No, you're not.  Just avoid the locals, obviously, who would clearly rather live in a big flat marshy field that they could keep to themselves :lol:

There is such a thing as what henke refers to, to be found clattering around paved streets in big boots, with walking poles and packs that look like they're going for an expedition to the south pole.  The ones who are just showing off their purchases with no intention of doing anything more strenuous than having a wander around Derwent Water are more to be pitied than scorned, but some of them genuinely are on long distance expeditions and are just resupplying, having to avoid restless natives all the while :lol:

Enjoy, Blencathra is a great mountain and a good fitness tester as an introduction to the bigger hills.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Toondave on Sunday 17 May 2015, 11:49:52 AM
OC, got Blencathra tentatively penciled in for next weekend, weather permitting of course. Am I becoming a hill w*****?  :D

Better than being a bus w***** I suppose! :lol:

Hill w***** is getting ahead of yourself; hillock pillock.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Sunday 17 May 2015, 03:19:00 PM
Keswick can fade into the earth for all I care. Anyone who was born there has long since been priced out, which makes the tourist coin irrelevant because the locals don't see any of it.

The truth is that this place is 100% dependant on the big atom plant on the coast. The one that supports every single family who doesn't own a holiday home here. The very same place that the Friends of the Lake District campaign against - for a couple of days before they do one back to Cheshire.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 17 May 2015, 04:10:52 PM
Well, as I say I could live without Keswick and Ambleside quite happily myself, and I don't find Buttermere any more attractive because it provides ice creams.  The argument that the locals are priced out runs all the way up the West coast of Scotland as well and it'd be hypocritical of me to pretend that I don't want to be one of the newcomers buying a house up there at some point. The reality is, of course, that it's down to economics and the plain truth is that there is no work for a sizeable population in mountain areas.

Seems unusual to be so down on visitors, though: my corner of Northumberland National Park is one of the quietest and most unspoiled parts of England but it doesn't get me down when people come here, although it's a completely different scale.  With Northumberland's charms appealing to a more select crowd, the likelihood of me ever getting stuck in a traffic jam on the way to the Cheviots is limited :lol:

Anyway, to get back to your original point: I don't hate you because you live in the Lake District, because I don't think I'd like to live there either :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Sunday 17 May 2015, 04:32:57 PM
Yeah it goes back to what I was originally saying, I live on the edge of a national park but the only time I ever see it is passing through to get to the M6. I don't hate the tourists, as it may seem, because I rarely come into contact with them. It's just weird how people travel from far and wide to visit something I regularly drive through and don't even look at.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: TheHoob on Monday 18 May 2015, 10:04:49 PM
Off up to Fort William for a few days camping at the end of next month. Anyone recommend any good camping sites/spots? Going to be 3-5 of us arriving quite late, probably end up being after dark.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Monday 18 May 2015, 10:22:17 PM
Took the Missus to three cliffs bay for my Birthday last week. Very fortunate with the weather and the whole time we were there we saw less than 10 people.

(http://s24.postimg.org/kjfrt5exx/3_cliffs_1.jpg)

(http://s3.postimg.org/735rk516b/three_cliffs_3.jpg)

(http://s14.postimg.org/ytan2p59d/three_cliffs_2.jpg)

Stunning beach with the ruined Pennard Castle on site.

Spoiler
(http://c8.alamy.com/comp/BJNC5X/pennard-castle-ruins-overlooking-three-cliffs-bay-the-gower-peninsula-BJNC5X.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 22 May 2015, 06:37:41 PM
Looks tremendous :thup:  Where's that?

Hoob: are you talking about wild camping or going to a proper campsite?  I've never camped around there but have considered the campsite near Glencoe on plenty of occasions.  Not Fort William, obviously, but only about 10 miles down the road.  Wild camping isn't that easy around Fort William because the place is so busy, but there's the potential for wild camping in Glen Etive and Glen Coe. There are tales of people being moved on from wild camping in Glen Nevis.

And Pedro: if you've still got Blencathra pencilled in for the weekend (tomorrow looks tremendous weather), then based on my ascent of it today, I would recommend a change to my route.  Instead of heading to the valley end then turning southwest to go up the ridge behind Sharp Edge, I recommend heading straight up the path by the waterfall that issues from Scales Tarn (obvious route with stone steps and the occasional easy rock to cross, nothing like as hard as Catbells) and climbing to the Scales Fell ridge from there.  It was lashing it down all morning and the section between that waterfall and the valley end, which is fairly pathless anyway, will be absolutely vile I suspect.  You'll not miss anything of note going this way, other than a couple of nice rock features and a traditional mountain zigzagging scree ascent high on Foule Crag: you still see people going across Sharp Edge (in fact, you're closer to it this way) and you can assess whether you fancy it yourself easier from this side than the other, since the hazardous drop is more obvious from here.  Joining the descent route high up also means you get to see which way you need to come off the top when you're heading back down, which is helpful because there are more paths than you might expect on the top and it's not always clear where they're going to.

Be ready for the first ascent up Mousethwaite Combe, it's a short sharp start to the day and will test your hill fitness :)  Whole route will probably take you somewhere between two and four hours depending on how fit you are.

New route would be:

(http://i.imgur.com/DSQO1Tq.jpg)

Also watch out for parking.  You need to come off the A66 at a tiny road marked Scales which goes up a steep single track toward a pub (the White Horse, I think).  There's parking just up there now on the right just under the telephone symbol on that map (never used to be), but you can, if you get there early enough, take a sharp right before the pub and drive a quarter mile along the narrow country road above that new car park to the very bottom of Mousethwaite Comb, which you'd otherwise have to walk along.  There's parking there for five or six cars.  If that's full, and the new car park is too, you'll have to head into one of the A66 laybys.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Shay's Given Tim Flowers on Thursday 28 May 2015, 11:13:40 AM
(http://s17.postimg.org/46k6m0nhr/swa.png)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 28 May 2015, 07:36:59 PM
Would never have guessed :)  Looks amazing, and amazing that it's so quiet that close to Swansea.

I'm back to Scotland tomorrow night, hoping to knock off either another Cairngorm or two, or maybe the majestic Slioch which has been on my hitlist pretty much forever :)

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3729/8927218442_9239d7d727_o.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 30 May 2015, 07:34:17 PM
Wasn't back to Scotland in the end so did an epic Lakes day instead, starting in Grasmere and adding seven Wainwrights to my count (Helm Crag, Gibson Knott, Calf Crag, Ullscarf, High Raise, Sergeant Man, Blea Rigg).  Around 20km and must have been Ben Nevis levels of ascent, I'm absolutely exhausted :lol:  And realised that I missed out Tarn Crag right in the middle, although not sure how I could have easily added it to the route without significant descent and reascent*.  I'll have to count the Wainwrights I've done, must be in the 60s by now or thereabouts.

*edit

Should have climbed it instead of Ullscarf and left Ullscarf for another day, obviously :anguish:

I wonder how Snoopdawg is getting on up in Scotland.  Ferociously cold up there at the minute and snowing around the highlands :(
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 30 May 2015, 07:57:01 PM
Not so many pictures, alas.  Being spoiled by Scotland, most of the Lake District doesn't seem so photogenic any more (w*** hills to go with the hill w*****s, perhaps), and particularly the dreary and low fells around this part of the world.  Some views still inspire, though:

Helm Crag summit ridge
(http://i.imgur.com/1sWdnuE.jpg)

High Raise summit featuring Scafell Pike, Great End, and a very prominent Great Gable
(http://i.imgur.com/Hiw2cQp.jpg)

Bowfell (under heavy cloud), Esk Pike, Scafell Pike and Great End (probably the four best mountains in the Lake District, although Wainwright would disagree vociferously).  This is the best viewpoint I've found for them.
(http://i.imgur.com/5Z3uMJp.jpg)

I added a significant extra hike onto the end of the day to try and get a shot here.  Didn't really work, alas, but Belle's Knot
(http://i.imgur.com/WoVRZIY.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 30 May 2015, 09:13:09 PM
:lol: so much cramp now

Thighs and feet, all night :anguish:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 31 May 2015, 11:40:35 AM
Did the CWT, 212 miles in total In 16 days, though probably could have cut that by a day. Weather has been generally crap and spent more times in B and B, hotels and bothies than I normally would.

Been back since last Tuesday 19th but had network access problems so couldn't post.

On with a trip report now on walkhighlands which I will split into 3 parts.http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=52516

 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 31 May 2015, 11:42:40 AM

Well done man :thup:  Kept looking at the weather and wincing for you :anguish:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Sunday 31 May 2015, 06:42:09 PM
Is Hill w*****s part of your vocabulary now? :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 31 May 2015, 06:48:32 PM
I've known that expression for a long time, alas, it's not unique to you lot :)

I have to say, though: wandering forlornly back through the streets of Grasmere up to the tits with mud and sweat after nearly eight hours out on the hills, being confronted with droves of people in similar outdoor gear to mine but brand spanking new and utterly clean, people but who clearly haven't been any further than a gate that leads to a field before heading back into town for more coffee.. well, I know what you mean.  They do my head in as well :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: STM on Sunday 31 May 2015, 07:04:48 PM
Got a peregrine falcon nesting half a mile up the road. Stunning creatures.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 1 June 2015, 05:29:02 PM
As mentioned previously recently did the Cape wrath trail a 212 mile journey over 16 days from fort William to Cape wrath. Anybody wanting to read the trip report here's a link to the 3 parts.  http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=52516

Some pics for this site.

Ben Nevis from Banavie railway station
(http://i.imgur.com/GyoEfhI.jpg?1)

Loch Lochy , Great Glen from Clunes area
(http://i.imgur.com/BJY7LP1.jpg?1)

Looking westwards up Glen Loyne
(http://i.imgur.com/BhCegCh.jpg?1)

The old road to the isles towards Claunie
(http://i.imgur.com/4wOvfqf.jpg?1)

Into Coire Fionnaraich from Coulags
(http://i.imgur.com/VHds7SS.jpg?1)

In Coire  Fionnaraich going up to the Bealach ban
(http://i.imgur.com/JHLCJeo.jpg?1)

Liathach from the Ling hut
(http://i.imgur.com/F7eCsAw.jpg?1)

overnight camp Glen torridon
(http://i.imgur.com/4QvYhwTh.jpg?1)

triple buttress Coire Mhic Fhearchair Beinn Eighe
(http://i.imgur.com/tEc5wDD.jpg?1)

Slioch from Coire Mhic Fhearchair
(http://i.imgur.com/R3QqwWi.jpg?1)

Lochan Fada
(http://i.imgur.com/qZKfANOh.jpg?1)

An teallach
(http://i.imgur.com/rd76GsHh.jpg?1)

Loch Coul
(http://i.imgur.com/WGckN73.jpg?1)

Arkle
(http://i.imgur.com/2PiBq87.jpg?1)

Storm on Sandwood bay
(http://i.imgur.com/9lPnoXZ.jpg?1)

Am buichaille Sandwood bay
(http://i.imgur.com/114eaku.jpg?1)



Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Monday 1 June 2015, 05:38:52 PM
Beautiful.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 1 June 2015, 06:11:36 PM

Nice one again :thup:

Best bit?  Worst bit?  Torridon and An Teallach way are hard to beat but I imagine the far North is also fairly special.  Love that shot of Arkle; looks like a range of low hills tipped on their side a little bit :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 1 June 2015, 07:29:24 PM
Best bit ?   hard choice but I would say that route from Coulags over to the back of Beinn Eighe, walking through fantastic country on old, well maintained stalkers paths.
worst bit? there's a few contenders, the storm from hell springs to mind having to walk 21 miles over 11 hours from Claunie to Maol bhuide bothy just to make the bothy, the trackless 3 miles after Beinn Eighe or the trackless ground over to Glencoul over the back of Ben More Assynt
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 9 June 2015, 10:35:21 AM
Off on my hols next week doing a two week in the van on a Caledonian Macbrayne island hopscotch tour. Starting off on Arran getting the ferry from Ardrossan to Brodick. haven't been there since 1999 so looking forward to it. Unfortunately cocked up on the booking meaning only two days instead of 3 on Arran.
Then its off to Islay leaving Arran at Lochranza ferry to cloanaig and drive to to Kennacraig to get the ferry to Port Askaig, Islay. never been to Islay before so it will be two days explore. The next ferry is on the Saturday ( they only run Thurs and Sat) back to Oban and drive through to Arisaig where we stay on a campsite for two days before getting the ferry from Mallaig  to Skye on the Monday. On Skye for 3 days and ferry before getting ferry to Harris and Lewis where we stay for 3 days before coming back to Ullapool. Will probably stopover in Glen Nevis campsite before driving home.

Probably wont get much walking in as I tend not to bother in the summer months.

Sunset from Blaven car park

 (http://i.imgur.com/Wkh9nby.jpg?1)

The Cuillin from Sligichan campsite

(http://i.imgur.com/jLd9ej8.jpg?1)

Horgabost beach Isle of Harris

(http://i.imgur.com/fZt5UWE.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/sbWxrp7.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 19 June 2015, 03:53:18 PM
Two days of rain and low cloud in Torridon and no views but managed to add Beinn Liath Mhor and Sgorr Ruadh (complete with terrifying descent from Beinn Liath Mhor through misted out crags then an unexpectedly exciting river crossing) and today Slioch, one I've waited a while to do (3.30am start on the hill, so many deer :aww:, and a much rougher climb than I expected).  Slioch was supposed to be my 40th birthday mountain but I'm here a week earlier than I planned :) Two really hard days, must be 40km and close to 3000m ascent.  Planned to do Fionn Bheinn on the way home tomorrow but I have no dry gear left :lol: will see if it dries overnight but I started drinking in The Torridon just after 3 so might not fancy it :)

46 of 282 done now but tbh, the thought of the mountains lurking in the wilderness behind Slioch - which is already plenty far enough out from the road network and took close to eight hours, two or three of which were just walking in and out - has put me off the idea of finishing them :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 20 June 2015, 03:35:29 PM

Nothing here to trouble the curators of the Photo Thread, but for a flavour of Scotland over the last few days

Fuar Tholl
(http://i.imgur.com/1nbGvcx.jpg)

Beinn Eighe from the ascent of Slioch
(http://i.imgur.com/H2CJ7DQ.jpg)

Slioch Ascent
(http://i.imgur.com/QlovdFm.jpg)

Liathach, Glen Torridon
(http://i.imgur.com/gvloBns.jpg)

Bealach na Ba, Applecross road
(http://i.imgur.com/TgCvq4r.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/8iZcUmE.jpg)

Skye from Applecross
(http://i.imgur.com/Sv2bQ8I.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 20 June 2015, 09:39:14 PM
I thought about this all the way home and have officially given up on the Munros :) I live too far from them and I don't want to spend my life driving up there to climb cloudy and dull hills just for the sake of list ticking :)  Will continue to climb new ones but if I never reach 282 then never mind :)

To be clear, though, none of this trip's hills were dull; just cloudy :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Sunday 21 June 2015, 07:11:29 PM
Hope Snoopdawg has made it off Lewis and Harris by now, absolutely rancid weather up there past wee while.  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 23 June 2015, 01:10:23 PM
thanks for that Colin, came back a week early as the weather has been abysmal. Got to Arran staying at Kildonan and lochranza then over to islay staying at Kintra and Port Charlotte before going back to Oban via Colonsay. Kintra would be perfect, camping in amongst the dunes but the 40mph wind and driving rain for 28 hours spoilt it a bit.
Drove on then through Fort William and then camping at Sunnyside croft camping site just shy of Arisaig for two nights. If anybody is up that way have a look at this camp site. We've stayed there now 3 times and its excellent, with great views over to Rum and Eigg though sadly not on this occasion. Made the decision to cancel the trip to Skye, Harris and Lewis and after learning of Calmac refund policy got a full refund for the cancelled journey.

OC I see you had similar weather. Beinn Liath Mhor has a bit of a sting in the tail doesn't it? I did it about 2000 on a clear day and remember the drop down through the crags after an easy approach to the summit and walk along the ridge.

With regards to the munros I understand that. It takes a colossal effort to push up the numbers given the distances, personal time, logistics , weather etc just keep visiting and doing fresh hills each time and see where it takes you. Although I had been chipping away at the numbers for a while i think I only really starting counting back in 2009 and made a conscious effort to seek out new hills each time I visited. I was using Irvine Buttefield,s book back then and had checked off the hills that I had done,looking at the book now I was only on 122 back then so have done 100 in 6 years. its become a bit of an obsession with me. I aim to get to 240 this year. I'm aching to get them done and to then repeat hills from the past such as Creag Megaidh or Ladhar bheinn or the Torridon hills     
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Tuesday 23 June 2015, 01:25:30 PM
 :thup: Just been seeing flooding etc in Stornoway the other day. My mum's been saying it has been really terrible. Sounds like you made the most of it anyway. Strange year weather wise, can usually guarantee a good few days of solid lovely weather end of May up there but not this year. Keep meaning to plan a trip up to do the majestic Suilven but might have to wait until September.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 23 June 2015, 01:54:31 PM
Yeah it has been crap. I was up in early April and the weather was better then than in May or June. still we must be due a good run soon.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Tuesday 23 June 2015, 05:38:33 PM
Had a lush day trailing through the Galloway Forest today. :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 23 June 2015, 05:47:37 PM
Not been up there for a long time, you on your jollies?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Tuesday 23 June 2015, 10:19:44 PM
Aye. Girlfriend's parents have a caravan up at Brighouse Bay, so making use of it. :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 26 June 2015, 09:05:12 PM
With regards to the munros I understand that. It takes a colossal effort to push up the numbers given the distances, personal time, logistics , weather etc just keep visiting and doing fresh hills each time and see where it takes you. Although I had been chipping away at the numbers for a while i think I only really starting counting back in 2009 and made a conscious effort to seek out new hills each time I visited. I was using Irvine Buttefield,s book back then and had checked off the hills that I had done,looking at the book now I was only on 122 back then so have done 100 in 6 years. its become a bit of an obsession with me. I aim to get to 240 this year. I'm aching to get them done and to then repeat hills from the past such as Creag Megaidh or Ladhar bheinn or the Torridon hills     

TBH my maudlin mood has already passed and I'm planning a Southern walk for my 40th this weekend :) maybe Ben Chonzie, maybe Beinn Tuilachan and Cruach Ardrain, maybe I'll make use of the long days and go for Beinn a'Ghlo.

Was thinking about the genuinely hard to get at ones today; in the scheme of things there aren't huge numbers.  In Pin, of course.  The Fisherfield ones which Slioch have made me fear.  Lurg Mhor and the one next to it.  The Knoydart few. Seana Braigh, maybe. Those insanely remote Southern Cairngorm ones.  I can do 250 or 260 before I start thinking about all those, which will sharpen the mind for the last 20 or 30.  I've done a sixth of them without that much hardship or planning in five or six years, it's obviously possible even for non-Scotland-residents :)

So difficult not to just want to go to Torridon, though :(
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 27 June 2015, 09:53:33 AM
I think everybody goes through that phase,particularly when you travelled maybe 600 hundred miles, spent a fortune on fuel, feel knackered and only got soaked in return and it's another few weeks before you can get away again. I boosted my numbers by being selfish started in 2008 taking a weeks walking holiday in April and May. In relation to the remote hills I started I think looking further afield around the late 90,s and started getting into knoydart. Initially I hated carrying the extra gear for the overnight stops but gradually increased the distances and days. Fisherfield you'd be surprised you could do with one overnight stop and bag 5 hills. You have time on your side,you're only 40 and have plenty of time, I,m mid 50,s and still going strong.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 28 June 2015, 07:55:24 PM
I think you're right and thank you for posting that :thup: I guess we all go through a crisis of confidence sometimes.

As it happens, my celebratory walk was again stymied (this time by broken, but hopefully warranty-covered, power steering).  Happily, I'm surrounded by hills and moorland so I went for a random 15km local wander instead.  Thoroughly enjoyable, other than being chased by cows :)

The Munro quest is back on, though.  Going to boost the numbers with a couple of rounds/ridges like Glen Lyon and Glen Shiel :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 28 June 2015, 08:51:56 PM
No problem. I know what you mean by cows. I hate being near them. Their increased numbers in the glens is something I've noticed over the last couple of years.

Sounds like we have similar targets. I'm breaking my habits of the last few years and going for some summer Munros. I will probably be in Kintail in the last week of July (in the van not tent camping) where I reckon I can get 12 munros in four day walks.

I've got loose plans for next May to get to Ullapool then backpack initially north onto Seana Braigh and Am Faochagach, then onto the two eastern Fannaichs but before heading to Fisherfield via Loch a Bhroain. Then its over to Kinlochewe to re supply and down to Lurg Mhor and "cheesecake" via Craig before heading for Shiel bridge ,through Knoydart and get the ferry back to Mallaig. About a 14 day trip and 14 munros.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Sunday 28 June 2015, 08:53:29 PM
If you think cows are bad, you should try bull moose. They will actually kill you.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Sunday 28 June 2015, 08:54:42 PM
Also it looks like a bunch of people got struck by lightning today up on a 14er here. Sad news. But when you're above the tree line the lightning risk is very real and very deadly. They were probably tourists since it was an easy 14er and they couldn't tell the weather was changing. :(
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 28 June 2015, 09:09:59 PM
I have experienced the terrifying electrical buzzing of the ice axe on my back as a storm approached.  Hideously scary.  Virtually everything that we call a mountain over here is a good 500m above the tree line which means huge exposure to the 75% absolutely unpredictable Atlantic weather rolling in.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 1 July 2015, 10:17:07 PM
Over the lakes today with two lads that I haven't seen for a while. Went up onto the climbers traverse on Great Gable as I,m trying to get back into scrambling and feeling happy with it. The Mwis had the weather at 40/50 mph winds rain and thunderstorm's and whilst  it blasted wind for a short period the forecast was wide of the mark. Here's a few photos of the day

link to report  http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=53762

First crag on the traverse which I believe is kern knotts crag

(http://i.imgur.com/4sPXont.jpg?1)

Napes Needle from below

(http://i.imgur.com/paB7YjJ.jpg?1)

The route up to the back of the needle commonly known as threading the needle

(http://i.imgur.com/v2CRxwq.jpg?1)

Scrambling buddy coming up the back of the needle

(http://i.imgur.com/YvNr9QS.jpg?1)

and dropping down the other side

(http://i.imgur.com/Wtw4aQI.jpg?1)

Napes needle. The scrambling route follows the rock behind the needle and straight down the cracks.

 (http://i.imgur.com/oMxv4a4.jpg?1)

The route continues along to the Sphinx rock

(http://i.imgur.com/vYFAzGL.jpg?1)

Top of the band that leads from the climbers traverse to the top of the gable

(http://i.imgur.com/QAj4I3Q.jpg?1)





 

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Haz on Friday 3 July 2015, 06:30:43 PM
C, are you a photographer that climbs hills or are you a Hill climber that takes photographs?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 3 July 2015, 08:39:18 PM
I'm both of these things, one (photography) led to the other (mountains).  I prefer mountains tbh, and am no longer disappointed if I get no pictures when I'm out (which is often the case, alas).

snoopdawg, missed that post.  Looks like a great day, and I had been planning on heading that way myself (but not upwards, more the girdle route around).  Last time I went to Gable I went up by Styhead and headed off to the left toward the traverse rather than climbing up by the Breast Route.. in the end, the weather beat me, so I ended up just going straight back down again.

Maps of Skye arrived today.  f*** me, it looks like serious business :)  In all honesty, I suspect I will spend most of my break with the family poking around Storr and the Quiraing.  If I get a good day I might have a shot at Blabheinn but there is every chance that the amount of rock and lack of path will intimidate :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 3 July 2015, 09:37:48 PM
Aye it was a great day and I've added a few more photographs. My legs are still sore which has surprised me as its normally a feeling I get from the first walk of the year and I thought I was still fit from the CWT. The only thing I can think of is that my walking pole packed up before the walk, I've been using a pole for about 6 years and I think its absence has caused me more movement than normal. Still its an excuse to get backover ASAP.

Regarding Skye yes it is serous business however there are a few hills that can be "easily" accessed. Bruach na Frithe is a walk with no technical difficulties and can be easily accessed from Sligachan. From memory (1983 ) its a good viewpoint for the continuing ridge southwards and also the Bhastier area.
In respect of Blaven its not technically difficult. I did it in 2013 and to be honest its not much more than the breast path on Great gable. The path goes across moorland for about 2 miles, then across into the corrie on stony paths and then right up a section of part rock and grass paths until you get to the point of the clach glas path. From there it is steepish rocky paths and a final rock rib about 35% which is not hands on, to get to the summit. I did the south top as well which was only 200 metres level walking and then dropping down that shoulder to the corrie. If you do it try and choose a clear day, the view of the main ridge and other islands is stunning.
You could try a few day walks from Glenbrittle. The coire of Lagan and A Ghrunda are worthy of a visit. Also worthy of a lengthy day is a walk down Glen Sligachan down to Loch Coruisk. The scenery is stunning.
Here's some more lakes shots

Ennerdale from Windy gap Great Gable

(http://i.imgur.com/0iXPF83.jpg?1)

Scafell Pike and Scafell from Great Gable

(http://i.imgur.com/wGVQnvU.jpg?1)

Styhead tarn

(http://i.imgur.com/7MTtvrZ.jpg?1)

Taylorgill force Seathwaite

(http://i.imgur.com/YHCKrDi.jpg?1)

Photo from the bottom of the back of Napes Needle before the scramble up

(http://i.imgur.com/qNLztMu.jpg?1)   
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pbxtn on Saturday 11 July 2015, 10:16:54 PM
OpenC suggested I post this in here to try and identify the peak on the left. It's somewhere between Loch Cluanie and Lochinver, sticking along the coastline for the most part.

(http://i57.tinypic.com/2lm417c.jpg)

This was pretty much the route...

(http://i57.tinypic.com/29ztnhu.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 11 July 2015, 10:20:10 PM
I suspect there are not many who can play Name The Peak on here, but this is probably the place to find them :)

The prow looks very familiar to me; I think either from the side of Loch Maree looking to Beinn Eighe, or perhaps part of An Teallach from near Dundonnell.

That's a route I know very well, which will be why I recognise it :)  all the same, if it's Beinn Eighe I find it hard to believe you didn't get a shot of Slioch on the opposite bank, and if it's An Teallach I would have expected more jaggedness.

Did you get to see the Torridon mountains or was it cloudy?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pbxtn on Saturday 11 July 2015, 10:21:10 PM
Just added the map if that helps   O0
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 11 July 2015, 10:28:13 PM
It does, I've edited :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 12 July 2015, 09:36:56 AM
Pbxtn, oc. I believe you're unidentified peak sgurr an fhidhleir in the coigach area just around the corner from ullapool
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 12 July 2015, 09:51:29 AM
I'd post a link but I'm on a kindle and can't do one, I have an smc guide book with a similar but closer photo
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 12 July 2015, 11:08:06 AM
That's the one :)  On (or next to) Beinn Mor Coigach?  You know your stuff, man :thup:  It's familiar because I spent so long looking at it when I was waiting for light on Stac Pollaidh, which never came :lol:

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5561/15048657746_3b077cc6e5_o.jpg)

I've never had a blue sky that far North before, it's always been grim and massively overcast for me.  The area suits it, though :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pbxtn on Sunday 12 July 2015, 11:33:53 AM
Pbxtn, oc. I believe you're unidentified peak sgurr an fhidhleir in the coigach area just around the corner from ullapool

 O0
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 12 July 2015, 02:30:24 PM
No problem
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Thursday 16 July 2015, 11:49:20 AM
What's everyone's favourite nature reserves? I'm thinking about signing up with the wildlife trusts so I can be one with the animals, but aside from that one in Gosforth, I don't know which ones are amazing and have the most going for them.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: BlueStar on Thursday 16 July 2015, 11:52:10 AM
Disc golf is a canny way of getting out and about. We play at Gosforth woods where there's a course painted on the trees, and further afield there's proper courses. Geocaching gives a ramble a sense if purpose as well.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Runner on Thursday 16 July 2015, 01:56:34 PM
Great thread
Got back Tuesday from a week solo on Skye, where I hadn't been for 25 years. Ended up on the campsite at Sligachan for all five nights- originally intended to move on to Glenbrittle or possibly over to Harris or Uist but the weather in the middle two days and three nights was so filthy that decided would keep everything drier by just staying put.
Didn't climb anything too dramatic ; did Beinn Dearg Mhor and Mhaodanach (sp ?)- first mile or so out of Sligachan is horribly boggy before you get to the ridge, or it was after two days of virtually non stop driving rain anyway.
Nice easy long walk round from Broadford out to Boreraig and Suisnish (saw my first sea eagle here) and then to Camas Malag and back to Broadford.
Best though was the walk out to Sgurr na Stri on the first (and best) day- easy for the most part ; tried to make it a bit harder for myself by looking for a route down to Camasunary and returning on the path from there but couldn't see an obvious one without going too far back- suppose its always easier picking out a way up from below than down from above.
Just sat on the top of Sgurr na Stri for over two hours taking in the view. One thing I've never known before- had a raven follow me for about a mile before the summit, flying off and landing on rocks to my left all the way and it then sat on the east summit for half an hour or so about 50 yards away. Either it has worked out that people with rucksacks could mean the chance of dropped food, or that they sometimes fall off crags and by staying close it could get first chance at the carrion....
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 16 July 2015, 04:55:03 PM
What's everyone's favourite nature reserves? I'm thinking about signing up with the wildlife trusts so I can be one with the animals, but aside from that one in Gosforth, I don't know which ones are amazing and have the most going for them.

The only one I know of is the one at Beinn Eighe way up on the West coast of Scotland, at Loch Maree.  I suspect that's a good deal further away than you meant, but it's amazing; pine martens and the most enormous dragonflies I've ever seen.  Not sure about stuff around here, but the Cheviots are really one big nature reserve if you go to the right parts.

Aye, I'm off to Skye on Saturday for the first time in my life (seen it from West Coast mountain tops enough time but never set foot on it); weather looks similarly filthy (should've gone this week), but can't wait :)  Got the family so I won't be off mountaineering too much, but thanks to snoopdawg Blabheinn looks just about do-able.  I'm not ready for the Cuillins yet, although I might head up to Bruach na Frithe if I get another fine day.  Sgurr na Stri looks amazing, aye :thup:  I love ravens on mountains :)

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 16 July 2015, 09:06:57 PM
Runner, funny that 25 years before a revisit, I only went back 2 years ago after my last visit in 1983!

Was over the Lakes yesterday, anybody wants to read a report here's a link

 http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=54254

http://www.trek-lite.com/index.php?threads/high-level-traverse-pillar.1130/

Some pics

(http://i.imgur.com/U1rRmud.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/kcRrn9w.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/p2xUFVl.jpg?2)

Will post more later, imgur just crashed !

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 16 July 2015, 09:49:32 PM
Looks great, I must get myself over to Ennerdale at some point :)  how do you approach it? From Gatesgarth or down the lake?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 17 July 2015, 09:31:21 AM
Gatesgarth on day trips as it easier from the ne, the only time I,'ve parked in ennerdale was a backpacking trip. It is a 2 and half hour walk up to the head of the valley from the car park
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Friday 17 July 2015, 10:29:07 AM
What's everyone's favourite nature reserves? I'm thinking about signing up with the wildlife trusts so I can be one with the animals, but aside from that one in Gosforth, I don't know which ones are amazing and have the most going for them.

The only one I know of is the one at Beinn Eighe way up on the West coast of Scotland, at Loch Maree.  I suspect that's a good deal further away than you meant, but it's amazing; pine martens and the most enormous dragonflies I've ever seen.  Not sure about stuff around here, but the Cheviots are really one big nature reserve if you go to the right parts.

Aye, I'm off to Skye on Saturday for the first time in my life (seen it from West Coast mountain tops enough time but never set foot on it); weather looks similarly filthy (should've gone this week), but can't wait :)  Got the family so I won't be off mountaineering too much, but thanks to snoopdawg Blabheinn looks just about do-able.  I'm not ready for the Cuillins yet, although I might head up to Bruach na Frithe if I get another fine day.  Sgurr na Stri looks amazing, aye :thup:  I love ravens on mountains :)



Christ, you weren't kidding with how far away it is like. Still, looking at the photos it looks worth it. Absolutely lush.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 17 July 2015, 01:56:34 PM
There's nowhere like it in this country (and quite possibly other countries), it's a phenomenal place and its remoteness puts off all but the most committed (thankfully; it would be terrible if the place ever got overrun with the beers-and-barbeques brigade that swarm on the Lake District every summer).

Heading up there tomorrow, 4AM :smitten:  Looks like pretty much the only bit of the West coast that might escape the rain.

Cheers snoopdawg :thup:  Didn't realise it was quite that long a valley but since it's way out West, Gatesgarth would be a better start for me as well.  Haven't been up to Scarth Gap for years but I suspect the Scottish miles I've put in will make it a fairly simple ascent these days :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Haz on Saturday 18 July 2015, 08:54:05 AM
Imposing photographs and excellent "3d". They should be in the Photo thread.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 18 July 2015, 04:37:04 PM
Skye is amazing, even with cloud at 600m and the heaviest rain I've ever walked in :)  big pools of water in the pockets of my waterproof :lol:

Drove past the Cuillins without seeing anything except Glamaig (which you can't really miss) but the forecast is picking up and up and up :smitten:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 July 2015, 05:48:58 PM
Just terrible phone pictures so far (which I can't work out how to link to from imgur or instagram on the phone), but Skye man :smitten:

Up to The Storr today, heading to Blabheinn Tuesday :)  also drove down to sligachan to see the cuillins this morning.  stunning :) they don't look very high from the bottom, but I bet they look plenty high enough from the ridge.

Can't wait to see the real pictures :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 19 July 2015, 06:17:17 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/J4qgjkP.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ecUNznq.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/hOebDum.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 20 July 2015, 10:25:20 AM
Oc great shots, weather looks a bit moody? Sure you've got plans ,have you got plans to get down to elgol, i,m sure you'll get a great shot of the southern cuillin over the water, or one of blaven over the bay,look forward to them.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 July 2015, 02:33:39 PM
Only rained on the first day so far; plenty of cloud swirling round the tops but I'm led to believe that's par for the course on Skye :)

Blabheinn tomorrow, over to Torridon Tuesday, Bruach na Frithe on Wednesday or Thursday.  Also want to get down to Glen Brittle and the Fairy Pools with the family Went to Glen Uig today and got the bairn to climb Castle Ewen with me :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 July 2015, 03:37:35 PM
Very roughly edited on the bairn's laptop, apologies if colours or sharpness or both and more are way off :)

(http://i.imgur.com/nMSvSDY.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/JvYZfrm.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/2ruH5Ah.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Monday 20 July 2015, 09:44:31 PM
My auntie and uncle went to Skye in the '80s and just didn't ever really leave. They built a house there and just stayed there. You can see why like.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 20 July 2015, 09:46:12 PM
It's astoundingly beautiful; it hasn't quite knocked my absolute favourite part of Scotland off the top but I could live here no problem at all :)  did you say he wrote a book on the place?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Varadi on Tuesday 21 July 2015, 08:17:12 AM
Just back from a couple of weeks hiking in the High Tatras in Poland, couple of hours south of Krakow, absolutely stunning place. First time trying out climbing on via ferrata, with the chains and ladders etc but found it relatively easy.


Looking up Mt Rysy:

(http://i.imgur.com/2aODqcIl.jpg)

View from the top of Swinica (7,500ft):

(http://i.imgur.com/RGsNlsZl.jpg)

Morskie Oko lake:

(http://i.imgur.com/pNQgxQGl.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/9i1rNaLl.jpg)

Chance stag sighting:

(http://i.imgur.com/dU3sZzjl.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Tuesday 21 July 2015, 08:42:39 AM
It's astoundingly beautiful; it hasn't quite knocked my absolute favourite part of Scotland off the top but I could live here no problem at all :)  did you say he wrote a book on the place?
Yeah, he's written a few.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Books-Roger-Miket/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A266239%2Cp_27%3ARoger%20Miket
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 11:11:51 AM
Varadi stunning alpine type photos, out of interest what made you choose the tatras ?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 01:43:36 PM
Absolutely drooling over these on Instagram at the moment if anyone else wants to look at them as well.

thetrickytree
campingofficial
natgeogallery
lifeonourplanet
wonderful_earthlife
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Varadi on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 02:41:49 PM
Varadi stunning alpine type photos, out of interest what made you choose the tatras ?

Ease of access mainly - live in Cyprus so it's one of the few places I can get easy budget flights to. Also cheap as chips - stayed in a really nice chalet-style apartment for 20 quid a night.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 09:44:05 PM
Aye, looks amazing :thup: can't quite get my head around via ferrata; how do you get around people if you need to?

Alas, I have to record a failure on Blabheinn today; I got to around 600m and a fair way up the crags and scree in the corrie headwall but the 50-60mph wind made me crouch to avoid being blown over too many times and while I daresay there may be a clever and easy route, I couldn't find it.  I found a few ways up (one scree run above the line of a burn, one narrow scree filled 'chimney' with a runout to a gully and a drop), there wasn't a way that I would have been comfortable downclimbing in that wind and the heavy rain showers that kept rattling through.  Amazing mountain though, never been on anything quite like it, even An Teallach and the Torridon munros.  Will probably give it another shot if I'm back this way.

I was gutted because the sky was generally blue so I wanted that picture from the top.  I found out at the Sligachan later that the Cuillins had been under cloud all day, so I didn't miss it.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: TheHoob on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 09:47:48 PM
That looks amazing Varadi. We did Nevis a couple of weeks back and I was hoping to be able to whack a couple of pics up here but the weather was absolutely abysmal. Probably couldn't see more than 20m once we were near the top. Absolutely love it up there though, we got to the campsite after dark and waking up in the morning and looking out over Glen Coe first thing was absolutely amazing. Dying to go back already.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 09:51:25 PM
Standard Ben Nevis conditions :)  I've probably climbed it 15 times in the last five years and only had a view off it twice :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: TheHoob on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 10:05:08 PM
No one tells you that! In a way i'm glad it was shrouded in cloud, there were a couple of points i'd have probably given up if I could have seen how far it was to the top  :lol: The last hour or so uphill through the snow was pretty brutal, didn't realise how unfit i'd become  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 10:11:39 PM
There aren't that many folk in the country - even some who run marathons or routinely cycle 70 miles - who wouldn't struggle on Ben Nevis imo; I (and plenty of others) spend a lot of time in the Scottish mountains and sometimes climb two, or three, or more munros (mountains over 914m or 3000ft) in one day, but I still feel it on Ben Nevis.  They're the longest unbroken slopes in the British Isles, you start virtually at sea level, and nobody should ever feel bad about feeling utterly f***ed when climbing them, particularly under snow which forces exaggerated big steps and tires even more :)

And just so you know, you don't see the top until you're pretty much on it anyway :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: TheHoob on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 10:30:20 PM
 :thup: Thanks man. Dying to get up there again and try some of the less busy climbs but not sure i'll be able to get up by the end of summer.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 22 July 2015, 10:40:28 PM
They'll be even less busy then :thup:  it's not unusual for snow not to cause a problem until October/ November.

mwis.org.uk will tell you when to go :)  and this thread can recommend the mountains for you (I recommend a researchy look at Stob Binnein, and at Beinn Ghlas & Ben Lawers, and at Schiehallion).
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Varadi on Thursday 23 July 2015, 08:12:41 AM
Aye, looks amazing :thup: can't quite get my head around via ferrata; how do you get around people if you need to?

The trickiest sections are one-way only - you have to go west-east so you don't meet people coming the other way, and the main summits have one way up with another down. In terms of overtaking there's plenty of places in between the chained sections where you can stop and perch on a ledge to let people past - I was climbing with the wife so we would stop quite regularly to have a breather/take photos and let the energetic kids fly past us!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 23 July 2015, 09:54:18 AM
Oc ,did you go in from loch slapin side? You must have missed the path from the lower corrie ,better luck next time. Hoob apart from those already mentioned I'd say give cairngorm a go to get the feel of the Scottish hills, the top car park is at 1800 ft and the slopes are easy, plus there tends to be less midges over the east side.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 July 2015, 10:18:33 AM
Aye, I went in that way; the rain and mist set in hard just out of the lower corrie where the burn crossings are, and only cleared after I'd already started up the higher corrie wall.  I came back down it in beautiful sunshine but I still couldn't see a way up and had been psyched out by then anyway.  Will try it again; it rained again as I would have been heading down (i think) and I wouldn't have been keen on threading an uncertain way back off; had enough of that on Beinn Liath Mhor last month :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 23 July 2015, 10:26:38 AM
Skye I remember a saying from my early days " if you can't see it ,it means it's raining,if you can see it ,it means it's going to rain " better luck next time,it's a typical tale as you know of Scottish hillwalking .I'm off to kintail next Saturday in the van for a week,hopefully the weather will change. Got my eye on the munros ,9 of them north of the Claunie  hotel and then a couple around at morvich
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pbxtn on Thursday 23 July 2015, 11:49:16 AM
Off topic snoopdawg but I stayed in that hotel a couple of weeks ago, had a pork and crackling meal with a caramel (I think) sauce, was lovely :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 23 July 2015, 04:50:42 PM
Good hotel,stayed there when I did the cape wrath trail,didn't have an evening meal,good breakfast and the best drying room I've experienced to date
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 July 2015, 05:09:49 PM
Last time I was there, about five years ago, the food and the service fell well short of what I remembered; I was gutted.  Heard a couple of folk say it's getting back to its best, which is good; it was always a favourite of mine.

I had another look (inside, so no wind threatening to blow it to Norway this time) at the 1:25 of the Cuillins which absolutely indicates a simple looking curved spur leading straight to the summit of Blabheinn from the upper corrie, under the little lochan which looks like Styhead Tarn.  That spur is not there on the ground, like :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 23 July 2015, 05:24:10 PM
Oc if you're not happy you could continue above the Lochan and join the rib that runs se from the south summit. It's a short 200 mtr " walk" over to the summit. I came down the se rib when I did blaven in 2013. It's a bit loose underfoot but straightforward plus if you did it that way you could pick out the main path from above. When I get on the laptop I'll see if I have any pictures to assist.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 July 2015, 05:34:29 PM
Aye, that was another route I was considering but I didn't get close enough to see if it was a goer or not.  To be honest, the narrow scree chimney I was talking about would have been fine on a less windy day (and there was a little cairn at the bottom suggesting it's a common route), but it was ferociously gusty and the rocks and walls were dripping wet - and the sight of the drop yawning beneath was enough to make me consider my mortality :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 July 2015, 05:38:24 PM
And aye, would be good to see any pictures.  when I get back I'll post the one I took of the headwall and try to indicate where I tried.  And if I had my gps recording (not sure) I'll post the sad little dotted line which will show my wandering around the crags :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 23 July 2015, 07:38:42 PM
OC don't know if these assist but until recently I didn't really photograph with the idea of a trip report in mind-I just took what I thought looked good.
The first photo you will recognise as the classic shot of Blaven. You can just see bottom left the path entering into Coire Uaigneich . The path continues into the coire and passes the large bottom buttress that you can see in the picture. After that I turned up to the right through steep grass and scree fields and from memory joined the ascending right slanting shelf that you can see. Its difficult now looking at photographs and trying to picture the route because its different being on the ground. 

(http://i.imgur.com/q4GZDqv.jpg?1)

The second photo is more or less the same ground and shows in more detail. You can see the path into Coire Uaigneich and if you follow the natural line of the shelf above you can see a path making its way through the scree to the summit. 

(http://i.imgur.com/vEpV29F.jpg?1)

If you were able to follow the true path you would have come to the point at these two photos which are the same location looking over towards Clach glas. This is a serious scrambling area and one I've not done myself. These photos were taken from the point where the top path starts through the scree and cuts left from these buttresses.


(http://i.imgur.com/UNW9XQo.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/G6zsdXI.jpg?1)

This is the SE rib running from the south summit. I've not any photos of the top of the rib from the summit. You can see the path cutting through the scree to the shoulder. The path going from the south summit to Blaven top is described as "awkward " I didn't find that ,I followed a level groove running between the two and used hands once. Rhum is the island in the photo.

(http://i.imgur.com/Db38vez.jpg?1)

Further shot looking out to the islands.

(http://i.imgur.com/nogMDSg.jpg?2)

Hope it helps and best of luck. Skye is like that, I went every year for 6/7 years in the late 70,s and early 80,s and spent many a time doing recces of routes

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 July 2015, 07:52:38 PM
Yeah, that's good to see.  I got to the top of the scree path by the burn into the upper corrie, then made the right turn on steep grass and scree toward the buttress you're talking about in thick mist and there were five or six different paths from there.  That's where I couldn't find an onward path that suited the conditions.  could see what looked like easier conditions toward the top from where I was but certainly didn't get high enough to see Clach Glas again.

It's the first time I've ever found myself properly beat and unable to proceed (i wasn't expecting that after having managed in Torridon and on An Teallach) but Skye has that reputation so I won't get myself too down about it :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 23 July 2015, 08:02:53 PM
No one tells you that! In a way i'm glad it was shrouded in cloud, there were a couple of points i'd have probably given up if I could have seen how far it was to the top  :lol: The last hour or so uphill through the snow was pretty brutal, didn't realise how unfit i'd become  :lol:

Hoob its quite often like that. These pictures were taken in early Nov 2009. First one is going up, looks great, the second is the frozen summit shelter and the third a white out on the way down. I've been up 4 times, only once it was clear and unknown to me the light exposure had bust on the camera so I have no shots!

(http://i.imgur.com/qHAHwsK.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/8Soi7ey.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/luGf40M.jpg?1)

If on returning you get a chance to have a look around the back of Ben Nevis to the north face, its well worth a visit, a far more enjoyable side to the Ben. Its only about a 45 minute diversion across the moor from the half way lochan.

(http://i.imgur.com/jmoTzp0.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/BUzLNF5.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 23 July 2015, 09:04:03 PM
+1 for the North of Ben Nevis; even if you don't climb a mountain, a walk up the Allt a'Mhuillin under the North Face cliffs is always worthwhile.

SD: I've always wondered if there's a way up to the Ben from Coire Leis without going over the arete (I loved the arete but never felt like doing it again).  Any idea?  The map looks like a mostly easy angled ascent SW from the Coire around 173717, but I'm sure it must be beset by crags.  I guess there must be a reason that it's not a recognised ascent.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 23 July 2015, 09:41:14 PM
To be honest I wouldn't like to say. I,'ve done it but a long time ago and actually can't remember it other than it was massive boulders. I remember the abseil posts being in place to aid a winter descent as the Corrie tends to stay frozen solid during the colder months. I have dropped down from the cmd arete to the coire before so I would be confident of getting back onto from the coire if I was up that way again.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 25 July 2015, 04:31:17 PM
A couple from Blabheinn showing where I got too intimidated to continue.  It looks like a beautiful day from these pictures.  It was, but only for about 20% of the time :lol:  Not pictured: high winds and frequent punishingly heavy showers :)

The whole top headwall from the upper corrie (click for bigger version).  I guess the route to the South ridge down to Camusunary must be the long rock slope on the left.  I swear I explored the whole of the easier looking grassy section on the right and found no traces of a previously followed path anywhere :lol:
(http://i.imgur.com/PxDOhJJ.jpg)

My highest point, looking up the scree run which looked like probably the easiest option but just didn't feel safe in the wind.  Pictures never do justice to the steepness :lol:
(http://i.imgur.com/ZXRfoe4.jpg)

I thought I took a picture of the rock chimney I mentioned, but I mustn't have.

The mountain looking stupendous on the way back down :anguish: 
(http://i.imgur.com/cIoO4TD.jpg)

Amazing that the Cuillin ridge, just a mile or two distant and not significantly higher, was under cloud all day.  I never really believed what I read about Skye weather, but it's absolutely true: never known such changeable conditions. 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 26 July 2015, 03:16:54 PM
OC judging by the broken nature of the rock in the second pic I think that was probably the path. Like the last shot of the soaring buttresses. 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 26 July 2015, 04:41:44 PM
To be honest, everything that could possibly be a path on there had bootmarks on it :)

Just consulted my Ralph Storer, which I should have done before I went.  He recommends the ridge, which I guess is easiest joined at the lochan or thereabouts.  Definitely wouldn't have tackled it in the wind, though, so I still wouldn't have managed :) Already can't wait to try it again, although I suspect it may be a while before I'm back.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Thursday 30 July 2015, 11:01:45 AM
Do any of you go wild camping in Northumberland or in the North East in general? I fancy going in a week or so and I know that Kielder have allocated locations where you can do it, but I'd much rather be able to have a small fire (which they don't allow), so I'd like to go somewhere a bit more secluded that won't f*** people off or harm the land too much.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Thursday 30 July 2015, 12:12:33 PM
Having a look back through and there are a few suggestions from years ago. If anyone has any other favoured locations though that would be class.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Saturday 1 August 2015, 10:51:50 AM
Havent clicked on this thread in over two months due to starting a new job and moving house and all that that entails. Looks like you guys have had some tremendous trips. I still haven't been able to get back to do Blencathra, in fact I've done very little walking at all in the past two months and put on nearly a stone. What a numpty.  :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 2 August 2015, 08:19:18 PM

Every time I come back from Scotland, when the weather allows me to see them, I remember how lucky I am to live in the foothills of one of the quietest and most unspoiled areas of high country in the UK.  Have spent the weekend blasting around the Cheviots, a long and random wander around Cheviot yesterday and the classic up-and-down Hedgehope from Langleeford today.

View down to Northumberland from near Cheviot summit
(http://i.imgur.com/BXp2Zdw.jpg)

Unexpected gliders in the other direction over the summit plateau
(http://i.imgur.com/E1W4OCv.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/gd67qiq.jpg)

Housey Crag on the way up to Hedgehope
(http://i.imgur.com/IflA4X1.jpg)

The view over the moor to Langlee Crags
(http://i.imgur.com/DrLGgsS.jpg)

Lola, making the Cheviots look way more dramatic than they really are
(http://i.imgur.com/xe12xf8.jpg)

Looking back down to the moors from Hedgehope summit, a much more accurate representation of how the Cheviots generally look and feel to walk on :)
(http://i.imgur.com/el1vDg9.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Monday 3 August 2015, 07:43:10 AM
Superb mate.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Monday 3 August 2015, 10:21:04 AM
Love how on that first one the horizon is completely uninterrupted. Brilliant.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: TBG on Monday 3 August 2015, 10:54:21 AM
Would love to take my dog somewhere like that but I can just see him running straight down that hill :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Monday 3 August 2015, 02:41:20 PM
Don't want to keep bugging everyone like, but i'm trying to find some good places to walk in Kielder that will be mainly forest/waterfall/nature areas, if anyone has any recommendations?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 3 August 2015, 05:21:34 PM
I don't know Kielder at all, sadly :(  I would have thought that there'll be waymarked trails to follow, though?

Alternatively, you could have a look at a long drive north to Wooler and then around to the College Valley, a private road (£10 charge at the Estate Agent in Wooler to drive down it and park, more than worth it IMHO) which leads right to the hidden (and amazing) North side of Cheviot, Bizzle Crags and the Hen Hole.  Not so much foresty, but who wants trees man?  They just get in the way :lol:  Googling College Valley will probably give you an idea of the place - it's a wonderful part of the Cheviots, and if you were feeling energetic it's also without question the best way to climb the hill - either up Hen Hole, or up the ridge above it.  At the very least, you can walk down to Hen Hole and have a short scramble up into the gorge, as far as you're comfortable going.

http://www.college-valley.co.uk/ (http://www.college-valley.co.uk/)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 3 August 2015, 07:00:45 PM
Love how on that first one the horizon is completely uninterrupted. Brilliant.

You should see the real thing man, on a day with no haze.  100 miles in either direction easy, Lochnagar in the Cairngorms to the Saltburn coast and further, it's astonishing (and obviously the sea horizon goes even further - I think you can get a sense of the curve of the Earth from up there, although most authorities would say absolutely not).  Until you get up toward the actual summit, which is a big flat grassy bog that you can see nowt from :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Monday 3 August 2015, 07:02:45 PM
Had this lush view camping just over a week ago. :aww:

(http://i.imgur.com/ce3xKCZ.jpg)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Thursday 6 August 2015, 05:14:22 AM
I think next week is my 14er week. There's a place called American Basin that is apparently going off with wildflowers right now and a killer 14er right next to it is Handies Peak: http://14ers.com/routemain.php?route=hand1&peak=Handies+Peak
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 6 August 2015, 06:07:22 AM
:thup:  Make sure you take pictures and post them here :)

Good to see that the amount of ascent you need to put in for a giant american mountain is the same (a bit less, even, in this case) as you need to put in for one of our more modest ones.  Had visions of feeling wholly inadequate next to epic multi-day ascents :)  I often wondered how high your roads went.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Friday 7 August 2015, 08:02:36 PM
Don't forget that you're over two miles above sea level though, oxygen is scarce. ;)

Quote
At 14,000 ft, the air has 43% less oxygen than at sea level.
:yikes:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 7 August 2015, 08:16:19 PM
Best take oxygen, then ;)  I guess even the average altitude for the state must be fairly high?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Friday 7 August 2015, 08:29:27 PM
Best take oxygen, then ;)  I guess even the average altitude for the state must be fairly high?

Yeah we're called the Mile High City here in Denver because our official elevation is exactly a mile. Most of the front range is around there, a lot of the mountain towns (Vail, Aspen, Breckenridge, etc) are around 9-11 thousand feet. You get used to it. When I first moved here simple tasks like tying my shoes or walking up a few flights of stairs would make me winded, now it's a bit better. You really have to get out and hike at elevation to stretch out your lungs, the highest I've been though has been about 10,500 and not for very long (it was only about 7 miles round-trip). I haven't hiked above the tree line yet, which is where the trees stop growing because they don't have enough oxygen to grow :huff: . Next week should be interesting!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 10 August 2015, 06:24:26 PM
Been away in Scotland for an 9 day mini break getting onto hills that I've been ignoring for years. I'm now onto 230 munros, 52 to go which hopefully I'll knock off by this time next year! The weather has been generally crap, windy and colder than average for this time of year, still never really got bothered by the midges which is why I've been avoiding being in Scotland in the summer for years. Done some big trips with big mileage and ascent and usually only in return for 1 hill. The photos aren't up to much, the hills are in general grassy and rounded and with no snow doesn't give much opportunity for good scenery.
Day 1. Drove up from home in the morning getting to the Braemar area about 1pm and walking up onto An Socach.

(http://i.imgur.com/MpfDl0x.jpg?1)

Day 2. Parked up at the hotel at Spittal of Dalmunzie and took the track to Glas Tulaichean, onto Carn an Righ and Beinn Iutharn mhor and back. About 14 miles and 4000ft of ascent.

View to Beinn a Ghlo from Glas Tulaichean

 (http://i.imgur.com/ujZ2wqo.jpg?1)

Beinn a Ghlo again from Carn an Righ

(http://i.imgur.com/BRdUreS.jpg?1)

Contouring path from Carn an Righ to Beinn Iutharn mhor. On top got caught in a 2 hour rainstorm

(http://i.imgur.com/Yxr76RM.jpg?1).

Day3. Slightly easier day. 10 Miles from Inverey to Carn Bhac. The photo is the view towards the Lairig Ghru from Carn Bhac

(http://i.imgur.com/hAR26ze.jpg?1)

Day 4. Mount Keen walked from Glen Tanar house. 16 miles in total. The photo is the shoulder of Mount Keen towards the top.

(http://i.imgur.com/Ecdff9l.jpg?1).

Day 5. Took the long drive north intending to get onto Ben Kilbreck and Ben Hope. Did Ben Kilbreck on the afternoon and when driving to Ben Hope found the road blocked. Had to do a further drive around to the north part of the road to Ben Hope to find that blocked as well!. looks like I'll have to do another huge drive just to do Ben Hope

(http://i.imgur.com/n6FsVAH.jpg?1)

On top of Kilbreck there was a ferocious wind, I couldn't even stand up on the top.

Day 6.Because of not been able to do Ben Hope, drove around to Ullapool and went up Am Faochagach. To get to you have to cross a boggy moor and do a river crossing. The view is Beinn Dearg from Am Faochagach 

(http://i.imgur.com/8jFPNEc.jpg?1)

Further shot towards Beinn Dearg with Meall nan Ceapraichean in the middle and Cona A Mheall on the right. Seeing the Cona a Mheall from this angle the ridge to it looks worthy of a visit

(http://i.imgur.com/pr6Nn3x.jpg?1)

Day 7. Parked up on the edge of Loch Glascarnoch and went up onto Beinn Liath Mhor Fannaich and took the connecting ridge to Sgurr Mor. I'd been on these two before and they are worthy of a revisit. The photo is the path from Beinn Liath Mhor Fannaich to Sgurr mor 

(http://i.imgur.com/BpanxgP.jpg?1)

Then continued on towards Meall gorm and An Coileachan. The whole trip was about 13 miles and took 8 1/2 hours.

(http://i.imgur.com/6nMvoE6.jpg?1)

Day 8. Another big day. Going from Inverleal and taking the excellent stalkers path over Seana Braigh in a 15 mile day.

(http://i.imgur.com/XDBnUyl.jpg?1)

Day 9. Easier day on Fionn Bheinn from Achnasheen. Up and down within 3 hours on a boggy hill never to be revisited!

(http://i.imgur.com/qNVX7ve.jpg?1)

 

 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 10 August 2015, 10:28:57 PM
Good going :thup:

I had been considering Fionn Bheinn last time I was driving back from Torridon, but found it squatting under a slate-grey sky which had descended to around 400m so thought better of it :)  It seems to be fairly well regarded on a good day after good weather :lol:

The Glenshee ones are very remote but I've been trying to get the motivation up to head back there; how long did it take you?  14 miles and 4000 feet would take me about seven hours in the Cheviots but I suspect this is harder going.  And can you park at the hotel up from Spittal of Glenshee, which I believe is now either closed down, or burned down, or possibly both?

Great stuff anyway :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 11 August 2015, 09:50:07 AM
Hi the glenshee hills from dalmunzie took 8 1/2 hrs.the hotel at the junction is burnt down.You follow the road from there to a further hotel 2 miles up a single track road,park there and pay £2.50 at the reception.You are within 200 yards of the start of either glen to take,personally I would go up glas tulaichan first as it's an easy track all the way to the summit which was about 2 hours
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Tuesday 11 August 2015, 11:28:05 AM
I went Wild Camping in Kielder from Saturday to Monday. A lot of nice views and the weather was really kind to us, but you can tell the industry is dying a bit up there and they've done a few things without warning that has p*ssed tourists and locals off alike. They stopped the ferry - didn't tell anyone. They've changed all of the buses - didn't tell anyone. The buses that are supposed to be on are incredibly unreliable. Suffice to say, if you need to go to Kielder, don't rely upon public transport beyond Bellingham, because it's terrible.

Anyway, it was nice to have a taste of the outdoors and using Kielder as a litmus test for whats' needed and not needed when walking and camping was a good idea because it's all fairly leisurely. We're planning to go to Glen Trool in Scotland at some point in the near future, so we feel like we know what we need and don't for that.

Kielder's really nice at the moment actually, the weather's okay to the extent that even when it's raining it's not cold. There are hardly any midges (at least in the area we stayed) and there's a fair bit of wildlife, including some fly amanita mushrooms, dragonflies and owls (heard but not seen unfortunately)

I imagine loads of you will already know Kielder really well, but I would recommend avoiding the north side of the reservoir because - for want of a better word - it's a bit boring. 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 11 August 2015, 08:05:49 PM
Last time I was in kielder was biking around the reservoir about 1998. Time before that was in 1975 on a school field study trip staying at a centre before the dam was built. The centre is obviously no longer there,it's under the water,don't know if they do  diving courses !
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 15 August 2015, 05:40:09 PM
Nice KI, I also haven't been to Kielder since I was tiny (I also recall the dam being built and feeling panicked that the government could just flood a valley like that).

Been over to the Lakes today; I was there on Wednesday and Thursday on Best Man duties so I got a feel for the place again.  Can't go wrong with Blencathra via what I always somewhat grandly regard as "my" route (since it was the first proper mountain I climbed, and I picked the route myself.. even Wainwright, who famously wrote more on Blencathra than any other mountain, didn't write about this route, as I recall).

I've posted the map a few times in this thread so I won't bother with that.

A couple of views, one and and one down, from halfway up the short, sharp start at Mousthwaite Comb.  This is a good start and reminds you that you're on a proper mountain - hard work, and a couple of awkward rocky slopes above biggish and steepish drops toward the top of this path just to give a bit of pause to respect that this isn't just a wander through a field.

Down, back to the A66
(http://i.imgur.com/3Ac0X5E.jpg)

Up, toward the top of the Comb
(http://i.imgur.com/MsHQnbs.jpg)

At the top of the Comb, you get your first look at the top architecture of Blencathra and the fabled Sharp Edge, and the delightful flat stretch of walk toward them both.  My route goes past the bottom of Sharp Edge and carries on to the skyline at the back of the picture, climbing the mountain that way.  The way back down comes down the grassy hill to the left.
(http://i.imgur.com/TJkQSIG.jpg)

Lola, on the flat bit.  The gap where the watercourse issues from is where we're aiming.
(http://i.imgur.com/vRO9Fhm.jpg)

Sharp Edge beginning to tower over the route
(http://i.imgur.com/gDSPzw9.jpg)

This waterfall issuing from Scales Tarn under Sharp Edge is where the choice has to be made.  Carrying on up the steps leads to the Sharp Edge route and the regular bypass path around to Scales Fell.  My route crosses the waterfall then goes on to a much more faint path through the grass.
(http://i.imgur.com/lFfbpx2.jpg)

The Cheviot-esque route ahead after the waterfall
(http://i.imgur.com/e1JSYQx.jpg)

At this second, smaller, waterfall it's very easy to go wrong.  Following the lower path leads to it petering out very quickly, and while it's not a difficult moor to cross, it's certainly easier to follow the higher path which keeps on all the way to the col at the top.
(http://i.imgur.com/feNzXHD.jpg)

The back side of Sharp Edge, not viewed from any other ascent route on the mountain
(http://i.imgur.com/pWiY0QM.jpg)

At the col, the views open up to the famously dreary and empty "back o' Skiddaw"
(http://i.imgur.com/DgjAMCk.jpg)

The start of the final ascent to Blencathra, again looking rather Cheviot-esque from here..
(http://i.imgur.com/MRkO0i1.jpg)

..but less so after that first skyline is reached.  This is a wonderful little bit of ridge, and is always very quiet.
(http://i.imgur.com/5tEvkcW.jpg)

Not the summit of Blencathra, but these people are close enough.  It's like a gigantic and gently tilted field up there, although it doesn't look that way from here.
(http://i.imgur.com/ya2vkNk.jpg)

Skiddaw and the Grasmoor group behind it, just before the final final ascent through the grit and scree.
(http://i.imgur.com/BEFaouK.jpg)

The final final ascent is quite steep and exposed (to the elements - not in a "long way down" sort of way), but mercifully short.  These two girls were unbelievably good looking :smitten:
(http://i.imgur.com/rkxYvcO.jpg)

Summit plateau.  I didn't bother going to the very top today; the path down starts just tens of metres (horizontally) short of it with all the climbing done, and I've been up there enough times.
(http://i.imgur.com/lNeeY59.jpg)

The start of the path down.  It would probably be a good ascent route as well, but not as good as mine :)
(http://i.imgur.com/2D1x08J.jpg)

It's a good path, well maintained, and ventures thrillingly close to some big drops to remind you of where you are. 
(http://i.imgur.com/FEOIR8X.jpg)

Classic Lakeland views toward the Vale of Keswick on the way back down.
(http://i.imgur.com/TFvrNHD.jpg)

And a good look at the long drop side of Sharp Edge above Scales Tarn.
(http://i.imgur.com/jWNzMZ6.jpg)

I forgot to take a picture, but the way I finish this off is to branch left off this path to rejoin my ascent path at the top of Mousthwaite Comb, but it would be just as easy to continue down the ridge to the pub at the bottom.  All depends where you parked, really :)

I'm a bit of a Scotland snob these days, but the Lakes does have some really great mountains, and this is one of them :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pbxtn on Saturday 15 August 2015, 06:00:31 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/TFvrNHD.jpg)

Fantastic this one  O0
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 15 August 2015, 06:14:16 PM
Cheers :) i haven't yet subjected any of them to the photo thread treatment,  there might be one or two suitable candidates.  Took about 30 of that view :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 15 August 2015, 07:56:56 PM
Oc I also over the lakes today doing the hills behind Braithwaite on what began as an iffy day totally at odds with the forecast. Just got back in so will post some pics tomorrow
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 15 August 2015, 08:05:33 PM

:thup:

Was going to go to Scotland but I just had a fancy for Blencathra and I didn't get myself on the road until after 9 so would have been a late day for a new munro.  Rained as I approached the hill but it cleared up beautifully :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 16 August 2015, 11:00:52 AM
Good pics OC, only saw them last night on the kindle. looked at them on the laptop this morning and I like the quality. I'm a bit disappointed with mine, was going to do a trip report on the walk but there's not enough photos as I've deleted most of them. The walk that we did was starting from the small parking area behind Braithwaite on the road up to whinlatter  was to climb up onto Grisedale pike, around the corrie onto Hopegill head, drop down to  Coledale hause and then instead of continuing to the gap between Grasmoor and Crag hill, go up the shoulder of Grasmoor to the top and then drop down to the col and up crag hill, take the descending path via the wide arête and down the shoulder and where the path drops to the mines take that and return via the 4 x 4 track to the car. About 10 miles I reckon over 7 hours. Here's some photos

Hopegill head from the top of Grisedale pike just as the weather was breaking.

(http://i.imgur.com/hpffIhf.jpg?1)

The path around the corrie from Grisedale pike to Hopegill head

(http://i.imgur.com/Kzy8kjc.jpg?1)

Looking towards Keswick from the Coledale hause between Hopegill head and Crag hill. Grisedale pike is on the left, Skiddaw next to it and Blencathra in the distance.

(http://i.imgur.com/nUQ66cQ.jpg?1)

Loweswater from the path up the shoulder of Grasmoor

 (http://i.imgur.com/UZhA6AX.jpg?1)

Buttermere from the top of Grasmoor

(http://i.imgur.com/TSRhSEN.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 16 August 2015, 03:48:43 PM
Looks great (and the pictures are more than good enough for a report man), that's one of the Lakes walks I've always wanted to do.  Not been anywhere near there, other than a quick wander along to Ard Crags and the other one on that ridge from Newlands Hause.

I've not been anywhere so dramatic today, but continuing on my quest to get all the 500m Cheviots I added the very central Shill Moor today.

Starting on the long dead end road that leads to the farm at Ewartly Shank
(http://i.imgur.com/WXmru2m.jpg)

The path on is basically a continuation of that road although fingerposts try to tell you otherwise.  They should be ignored at all costs as they point only to that terrifying wobbly grass bog which I posted about a few months back.  Shill Moor is the hill in darkness in the middle here, with the long ridge of Cheviot behind it.
(http://i.imgur.com/LfdVrNm.jpg)

The farm of Ewartly Shank.  It feels like a trespass, but the path heads right through the farm buildings.
(http://i.imgur.com/lAVNO71.jpg)

Past the small forest behind Ewartly Shank, the road ahead is more clear.  You can follow this farm/estate track for most of the walk's length.
(http://i.imgur.com/ZfxTTRu.jpg)

Cushat Law is ahead on this section, one of the "big" Cheviots although just scraping into the 2000 footers by all of 20 feet.
(http://i.imgur.com/q3dThO9.jpg)

Eventually the path has to be left and the gentle, unsurprisingly boggy, and pathless slopes of Shill Moor have to be ascended as best you can. 
(http://i.imgur.com/g3q4oGO.jpg)

It was much more difficult going than I expected; long grass trampled into awkward potholes by cows, and the occasional hidden bog.  I don't know what this stuff is, but I always associate it with bogs and whenever I see it I go into "your next step could land you three feet down a boggy peaty hole" mode.
(http://i.imgur.com/ke2O1ih.jpg)

Shill Moor summit finally appears
(http://i.imgur.com/PUM2sjc.jpg)

It's a delight to approach from here through the blooming heather with no trace of a path.  Although the twin cairns surrounding the trig point are positively palacial, this is clearly not a place that people come very often.
(http://i.imgur.com/81Xd4yO.jpg)

The Cheviot - but only the very top bit, the rest is Comb Fell - over the heather
(http://i.imgur.com/XKJN2sr.jpg)

Cheviot (with Comb Fell lurking invisibly in front) and Hedgehope from the cairn.
(http://i.imgur.com/W6CbCG4.jpg)

View to the three other high Cheviots, Cushat Law, Bloodybush Edge and Windy Gyle
(http://i.imgur.com/I9mB2ht.jpg)

Spoilered for page-breaking width: panorama from the summit showing all the high Cheviots: Cushat Law, Bloodybush Edge, Windy Gyle at the back leading up to Cheviot with Comb Fell in front, and the only shapely one of the bunch, Hedgehope, far right.
Spoiler
(http://i.imgur.com/GIFm4VL.jpg)

A quad track on the way back down.  This did not guarantee easy going, alas
(http://i.imgur.com/SU43CEy.jpg)

Typical Cheviots scenery on the way back down, looking toward Ingram/Breamish valley
(http://i.imgur.com/BIHU6wF.jpg)

One for lovers of solitude only, and not one I would really recommend to a casual walker - but an amazing viewpoint for all the high Cheviots, and reasonably easy to get at.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: colinmk on Monday 17 August 2015, 10:46:07 AM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-south-scotland-33920065

One for Mick? Absolutely love golden eagles, such a beautiful thing to see flying.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 17 August 2015, 05:42:40 PM

Aye, will be nice to see them back South of the border in any numbers (although I swear to God I've seen one in the Westernmost reaches of the Cheviots before; it's not like you can mistake them for anything else).

I don't think for one second that they won't just be poisoned by w***** gamekeepers, though, since the grouse moors up here are still lucrative business.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Monday 17 August 2015, 06:36:30 PM

Aye, will be nice to see them back South of the border in any numbers (although I swear to God I've seen one in the Westernmost reaches of the Cheviots before; it's not like you can mistake them for anything else).

I don't think for one second that they won't just be poisoned by w***** gamekeepers, though, since the grouse moors up here are still lucrative business.

A pair nested near Deadwater Fell and somebody cut the tree down that they were using so they headed back over the border.  You just have to look at what is happening already to know they'll more than likely be either shot or poisoned.

It's not just Northumberland, Durham is terrible once you reach the grouse moors.  The land owned by Jeremy Herrmann is a no-go area for anything that they class as vermin.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 19 August 2015, 06:18:36 PM

Booked up to go back to Skye in October.  No idea what to expect from the weather but I've had amazing days in Torridon around then so hopefully I'll get a break :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 19 August 2015, 08:05:28 PM
Enjoy. I'm off backpacking for 12 days early October from Corrour station on Rannoch moor and through to the Cairngorms hopefully bagging 8 munros that are difficult to get. Hopefully we'll get an Indian summer and some settled conditions
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 29 August 2015, 11:16:18 AM

Going for my 50 tomorrow in Glenshee; looks like a fairly straightforward round of Cairn an Tuirc, Tolmount, Tom Buidhe and Carn of Claise from the carpark just North of the ski centre :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 29 August 2015, 02:15:07 PM
Enjoy I,'ve done the 4 before from the ski car park missing out on tolmount and Tom bhuide as I,'ve done them before.I'm missing out on hillwalking for a week over in golden sands bulgaria for the week.sun sand,30+ degrees and plenty of local ale
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 29 August 2015, 02:27:08 PM

Sounds like a reasonable alternative :lol:

Seems there are a virtually infinite number of ways to put the hills around the Mounth together.  The only ones I've done on the East of the pass are Glas Maol and Creag Leacach, so these four seem to present themselves as a round leaving a circuit of Loch Muick to get the other five.  Not sure if that's feasible but it looks just about do-able.. although I might leave Lochnagar as a solo just because its reputation is so good.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 29 August 2015, 02:31:20 PM
You're right,endless possibilities,I'm going over lochnagar in my October backpack doing the other munro  that I can't spell right now which is actually part of the lochnagar plateau.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 29 August 2015, 02:33:03 PM
Carn a' Choire Bhoidheach, I'm guessing :lol:  I always think I'm getting good at Gaelic, then run up against something like that :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 29 August 2015, 02:47:51 PM
that's the one did, haven't tried it on the kindle God knows what it will change it to, did lochnagar from Glen callater a few years back and hadn't done any research so missed out on that summit as I didn't know it had two munros and th it doesn't look like a separate summit from the plateau
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 30 August 2015, 12:52:26 PM
50 done, assuming i get down from this one :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 30 August 2015, 07:53:07 PM
Up at five to drive to Glenshee is some dedication.  This is not generally a highly regarded part of Scotland :)

It wasn't a day for photographing the route as I usually do; frequent cloud covering the tops and light rain were a feature for the whole time, so here are some selected views (mostly featuring the intrepid, and fitter than me, Lola) from when the rain abated.

Around Lauder on the drive up
(http://i.imgur.com/ddGkk2U.jpg)

Carn an Tuirc, setting off
(http://i.imgur.com/E6s8FuL.jpg)

Looking over toward Garbh-Coire
(http://i.imgur.com/komIgG3.jpg)

Golden Eagle, not done justice
(http://i.imgur.com/5pLGISJ.jpg)

Lola on the way up to Carn an Tuirc from the ruined hut at the end of the roundabout path
(http://i.imgur.com/qOPimfx.jpg)

Looking back to Carn Aosda and the pass
(http://i.imgur.com/lvxI1Rx.jpg)

Carn an Tuirc summit.  Navigational misgivings.
(http://i.imgur.com/PHzAlgx.jpg)

Love on the Mounth
(http://i.imgur.com/3RpA3x7.jpg)

Lola eyeing up a hare above Glen Callater
(http://i.imgur.com/pc0RoPK.jpg)

Tolmount
(http://i.imgur.com/0iUU0Ax.jpg)

Tom Buidhe
(http://i.imgur.com/tWab6if.png)

Cairn of Claise summit
(http://i.imgur.com/ez5BXNd.jpg)

Carn Aosda again, from the descent from Cairn of Claise
(http://i.imgur.com/560av3J.jpg)

Lola with the first clean water since that burn some time ago
(http://i.imgur.com/F9r2zBn.jpg)

Posing on Sron na Gaoithe
(http://i.imgur.com/vuwAEt1.jpg)

Carn an Tuirc looking altogether more pleasant before I left
(http://i.imgur.com/J9KSIPb.jpg)

Full report here (http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=55760), a bit wordy for Newcastle Online :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Monday 31 August 2015, 06:55:31 PM
Some amazing stuff there like OC. It's hard to pick any out, but that Carn an Tuirc summit photo is pretty other worldly, it looks like you could envisage yourself on another planet there.

I know you're more into your hill climbing but have you been to Galloway National Forest before? We're going at the end of September for some camping and a bit of walking so we're trying to research the best places to go for views, stargazing and so on...
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Monday 31 August 2015, 07:02:00 PM
I've been a few times. It's a lovely place around that area.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Tooj on Monday 31 August 2015, 07:02:42 PM
Kirroughtree visitor center would be the best place to start.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Monday 31 August 2015, 07:04:18 PM
Ah mint, is there anywhere in particular that you'd recommend/avoid or is it just all good? We're going to be wild camping so lush views and stargazing are the two most important things really.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 31 August 2015, 08:04:12 PM
Aye, there aren't any mountains around there so i haven't been but i don't know anyone who's come back disappointed (weather permitting) :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Monday 31 August 2015, 08:12:00 PM
Kirroughtree visitor center would be the best place to start.

Just seen this now. Mint, cheers. :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 31 August 2015, 08:18:33 PM
Carn an Tuirc summit photo is pretty other worldly, it looks like you could envisage yourself on another planet there.

Aye, it's a really strange place.  The Cairngorms are deceiving because of the high starting points but the altitude gives them Arctic ambience, weather, flora and fauna. It's hard to believe looking at it, but virtually all of the moorland in that shot of Lola looking at the hare is higher than the summit of Scafell Pike,  highest mountain in England.

I got the fear venturing through those stones on Carn an Tuirc following the compass, because it looked exactly the same in every direction :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 5 September 2015, 05:39:24 PM
Absolutely insane wind on Mayar and Driesh today, never known anything like it.  I could barely stand at the first summit and had to approach the second crouched down in the manner of a primitive ancestor of man.  The col between the two hills was full of worried looking people who didn't want to take any path down because they all felt too exposed when you were worried about standing up straight.

Pictures to follow, although most of the time I was too afraid to take the camera out of my bag for fear of losing everything in it and having to drive to Fort William to see if they'd landed around there :lol:

Anyway, 52 :) 18.4% :sweetjesus:

Exhilirating day, but good god it gets blowy up there sometimes :anguish:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: cubaricho on Saturday 5 September 2015, 09:20:11 PM
It started snowing on some of the 14ers this week. Looks like high elevation hiking season is quickly coming to a close. :'(
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 5 September 2015, 09:41:37 PM

Aye, was snowing in the Cairngorms today just North of where I was.  You can walk in the snow, you just have to have the right stuff and a bit of experience :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 6 September 2015, 09:26:44 AM
Pictures are not to my satisfaction; the conditions were very difficult anyway, and the sun was behind cloud the whole time early in the walk when I could get pictures, so it was much darker than it appears here.  My dog had been kicked by a horse so was not with me on this occasion.  All for the best, really; I suspect I might have lost her in the wind.

Driving up Glen Clova I had noticed how unusually blowy it was, but the first part of the walk is protected by steep corrie walls and forestry so for the first hour or so, there was no problem.  Getting out into the very lovely Corrie Fee (another NNR if you're reading, KI, and one which is definitely worth a look if you ever find yourself in the Dundee / Angus region) the wind immediately picked up and given that the forecast had been for Northerly winds (which I should have been protected from where I was) at 15 - 20mph (which was evidently a massive underestimate given the speed of the clouds and the fact that the waterfall at the corrie end was being blown upwards), I began to have concerns about how conditions might be up on the plateau.

Corrie Fee, which you enter about 45 minutes after setting off.  After the dull walk through the forestry, it comes as an amazing surprise.
(http://i.imgur.com/UDk3CPx.jpg)

The path heads up by the waterfall at the head of the corrie, and is a thing of wonder - a nice and easy way up what is a very steep headwall, with amazing views back down the corrie and the occasional feeling of exposure just to keep you interested.

The path up.  The waterfall was blowing upwards.
(http://i.imgur.com/SUxbrIT.jpg)

View back down into Corrie Fee
(http://i.imgur.com/5mAssxJ.jpg)

Emerging onto the upper flanks of Mayar from Corrie Fee, the wind didn't pick up as I expected and I started to wonder if it had actually just dropped to the forecast level.  This part of the walk was a real surprise - there hadn't been any really hard work yet, and the upper slopes of this mountain - from this direction - are just a constant and very gentle grassy slope.  This is, I think, the easiest Munro I've ever climbed.  Views opened up behind toward Lochnagar and to the higher Cairngorms and beyond, and it all looked very good indeed, but the wind had started to get up again.

The upper slopes of Mayar.  This is the steepest part once you're out of the corrie.
(http://i.imgur.com/j71bfsY.jpg)

Views to the West were outstanding but it was already getting too windy to comfortably take pictures
(http://i.imgur.com/dqFfOqB.jpg)

Mayar summit cairn
(http://i.imgur.com/8qJQkRh.jpg)

On the small plain that forms the summit of Mayar, the wind returned properly.  I hadn't felt that the open slopes I'd been climbing would have served as much protection from the wind, but I was utterly and abominably wrong.  I've never been out in wind like it; a constant buffeting roar like some f***er in Final Fantasy had cast Aeroja at you (one for the games forum there).  I've been in situations where it's difficult to stand before, but I've never known anything like this.  I couldn't get the camera out for fear of losing the lens cap, and I was getting chilled to the bone but I know that if I'd tried to get out my coat, it would have been in Fort William in around 15 seconds.  I beat a hasty retreat from the summit and got completely disorientated, heading in entirely the wrong direction for 30 or 40 metres before I realised my mistake.

Dropping down to the broad ridge that runs between Mayar and the second Munro of the day, Dreish, I expected the wind to drop off and so it did but only very slightly.  I got one shot of Dreish from the low point of the ridge and then put the camera away in the pack and got out the coat. 

Dreish from the ridge.  It looked better from Mayar summit but I couldn't stand to get the picture.  Last photo of the day.
(http://i.imgur.com/NpJNJLd.jpg)

The wind on Dreish was even stronger, and the summit even higher and broader.  What should have been a simple ascent was made positively spine-tingling and I ended up having to appoach the cairn almost on my knuckles, in the style of Cro-magnon Man.  I didn't hang about and got straight down to the spur which leads back down into the valley, and found myself surrounded by unhappy looking walkers who couldn't decide which way to go down since every direction felt too exposed when they were worried about standing upright.  In the end, the standard descent route quickly became sheltered by the spur and the corrie walls.

This would have been one of my favourite walks I've ever done, I suspect, had the weather been less demonic.  It's a beautiful place and while the mountains aren't particularly thrilling, they're relatively easy to get at and the walk to, and between, them goes through some amazing scenery.

On the off chance that somebody is reading this and fancies a go, Glendoll costs £2 to park, which is relatively unusual in Scotland and which i suspect might catch a few out :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Saturday 12 September 2015, 10:08:46 PM
Sickening, not as bad as the 22 birds of prey killed in the Black Isle in Scotland but still disgusting that this is happening in 2015.

http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/three-red-kites-north-east-10035898

Three red kites from the North East are found poisoned
 
15:26, 11 September 2015
By Tony Henderson
 

Protectors of the red kites reintroduced in 2004 express fears about the birds not expanding outside their core Derwent Valley area

Protectors of the North East’s red kites have condemned the poisoning of three of the birds of prey.

A total of 94 young red kites were reintroduced from 2004 into the Derwent Valley in Gateshead but conservationists have expressed concern that the birds have not expanded beyond their core area in the last 11 years.

Now the Friends of Red Kites (FoRK) have revealed that three birds found dead at the end of last year had been poisoned.

They were taken away by Natural England for tests and the results have been published in a quarterly bulletin on post mortem examinations of wildlife cases where poisoning is suspected.

Published on the website of the Health and Safety Executive, they show that two red kites found at High Spen in Gateshead had ingested the pesticide Methiocarb.

The third, discovered at Edmundbyers in County Durham, had died from poisoning by Carbofuran, one of the most toxic of pesticides which is banned in the EU.

“Red kites have not spread from the Derwent Valley as we hoped they would and we feel this is because of persecution by shooting and poisoning,” said FoRK secretary Harold Dobson.

The three deaths brings the total number of known kite casualties from illegal poisoning in the region to 10 in recent years.

FoRK fears that the known deaths are just the tip of the iceberg and that many more dead birds are never found.

It believes that persistent persecution, mainly through illegal poisoned baits, is among factors preventing the birds from spreading from their core Derwent Valley sites.

One of the High Spen birds was a wing-tagged female from a nearby breeding site which had produced young for the previous four years.

Previous poisoning involved two kites found dead in Hexhamshire and a breeding pair killed near Whittonstall in Northumberland whose chicks then perished in the nest.

Other local kites were found poisoned in Teesdale and Wharfedale, Yorkshire.

Another bird, which moved to Scotland, was found poisoned in the Cairngorms.

Other kites have been found in suspicious circumstances but have been dead too long for scientific examination.

Allan Withrington, FoRK kite welfare Officer, said: “These poisonings are appalling and totally unacceptable. Carbofuran has been illegal in this country for many years but is still apparently the poison of choice of those who illegally put out poisoned baits to target raptors, crows and foxes.

“Leaving poisoned baits in the open is not only illegal but completely indiscriminate as the deaths of many bird and animals, including dogs and cats, has shown over the years.”

“We will be continuing to do everything possible to expose those responsible and work with the police, farmers, landowners and other conservation organisations to protect the red kites and other species.”

The most recent available figures from the RSPB show that there were 76 confirmed cases of illegal poisoning in Britain in 2013, including 19 from Carbofuran and five from Aldicarb.

Twenty-one red kites were among the victims which also included buzzard, white-tailed eagle, golden eagle and marsh harrier. Raven, magpie, sparrowhawk died along with two dogs and two cats.

Britain’s single worst recorded wildlife poisoning incident occurred in April last year when 16 kites and six buzzards were found dead near Inverness.

Members of FoRK travelled to Inverness to join a rally in protest at the killings.

The Derwent Valley red kites have inspired here is a Go North East red kite branded bus service, a red kite pub, and red kite entrance signs to Rowlands Gill in the valley, while 14 schools have adopted and named their own birds.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 12 September 2015, 10:19:54 PM

I can't tell if they're trying to say that the poisoning is deliberate on the part of landowners, or if it's just because farmers are using it and it's getting into the birds that way?  Obviously the bloke from the action group feels it's persecution, but is there any room for doubt?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Saturday 12 September 2015, 10:37:19 PM

I can't tell if they're trying to say that the poisoning is deliberate on the part of landowners, or if it's just because farmers are using it and it's getting into the birds that way?  Obviously the bloke from the action group feels it's persecution, but is there any room for doubt?

The use of Carbofuran was banned throughout Europe roughly 8 years ago, it was used as a pesticide.  Birds of prey only eat meat so how would a long time banned pesticide get onto meat?  I doubt you would keep a banned substance for 8 years then start using it or stock enough to use for 8 years as a pesticide.

The only time I see this chemical mentioned is when it kills birds in our country and lions in Africa.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 17 September 2015, 11:34:30 AM
Lakes trip yesterday, topping up the fitness for a Scottish backpacking trip next month. Drove over to Glennridding Ullswater and parked up at the lay by about 1/2 mile north of the village. It costs £8 per day to park in the big car park, I'd rather walk the extra 1/2 mile. Got there for 8.30 and was walking by 8.45. The forecast had been 15mph wind increasing. There was no wind and the car temp read 5 C , perfect for walking. Walked into the village and took the road past the travellers rest PH up towards the YH. Went up to Sticks pass and then onto Raise and Whiteside before climbing onto Lower man and then walking onto Helvellyn. Got there just after 12 noon. Initially the plan was to walk along the Helvellyn ridge and then drop down to Grisedale tarn and out through the valley but I hadn't been on Striding edge since around 2003 usually because its always heaving so started to think about doing it. It was too early to go down onto Striding edge because to do It now would mean being at the car by 14.30 so I walked along the Helvellyn ridge to Nethermost pike by the corrie edges rather then the Helvellyn highway- the main route along this way-and continued onto Dollywagon pike. There is a spur that runs to the summit of Dollywagon pike from the climbing hut below in Grisedale that I'd done before. After a rest on top of Dollywagon pike I returned to Helvellyn via the highway and went to the top of Striding edge getting there for around 13.45hrs. Dropped down to the edge and continued along it by passing a few people who were either hobbling along it crab style or going too slow. Dropped down to Red tarn and then walked out via the spot height of 718 metre on Birkhouse moor and down to the camp site at Gillside and back to the car. I usually give Helvellyn a miss because of its popularity and I still wouldn't say its a favourite however doing it yesterday and looking at it from different angles and in different light it is actually an impressive mountain and if you like your mountains like I do it has everything you would wish for. Here is few pics. I'm not impressed with them as they don't portray what the light was actually like. Think I'll have to look for a new camera.

Catysecam from the Yh

(http://i.imgur.com/mC3tEKN.jpg?1)

Lower man from Whiteside

(http://i.imgur.com/McKybeL.jpg?1)

Top of Lower man

(http://i.imgur.com/tbfEXh0.jpg?1)

Classic shot of Red tarn and Striding edge from the top of Helvellyn

(http://i.imgur.com/tNEZ1LY.jpg?1)

Helvellyn from Nethermost pike

(http://i.imgur.com/UEpYG00.jpg?1)

Across the range from Dollywagon pike

(http://i.imgur.com/BIRfff0.jpg?1)


Striding edge looking to Helvellyn

 (http://i.imgur.com/sXHlIh3.jpg?1)

Red tarn and swirral edge

 (http://i.imgur.com/VdIJ1nI.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Thursday 17 September 2015, 11:44:43 AM
Really beautiful. Do you ever come across much nature when you're in these places? You and OC always seem to choose quite desolate places, but I suppose that comes with the altitude.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 17 September 2015, 12:05:31 PM
Not really in the lakes. Apart from the birds this is about as much as I saw yesterday! Scotland however is a different story.

(http://i.imgur.com/bksvgQg.jpg?1)

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Kid Icarus on Friday 18 September 2015, 03:39:24 PM
https://www.reddit.com/r/EarthPorn/
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 18 September 2015, 07:11:50 PM

Wildlife in Scotland is astonishing; eagles, ptarmigan and other birds (never seen a capercaille), red deer, reindeer, mountain hares, astonishing.  Depends where you go, of course :)  You have to get away from the roads, and in the Lakes that's difficult sometimes.

My lass is coming with me tomorrow for the first time; amazing forecast for the whole of the North of Britain, really, so I think I'll head back up to where I was a week or two ago and go up Mayar.  Easiest munro I've ever climbed, and there's a good chance of seeing the Golden Eagle she's so desperate to see up there.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Friday 18 September 2015, 07:36:08 PM


Around Lauder on the drive up
(http://i.imgur.com/ddGkk2U.jpg)


Incredible pic. Sell it on canvas, id buy it. Your shots are something else OC.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 19 September 2015, 10:40:20 AM
Agreed,should get some great shots today
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 19 September 2015, 10:42:31 AM

Wildlife in Scotland is astonishing; eagles, ptarmigan and other birds (never seen a capercaille), red deer, reindeer, mountain hares, astonishing.  Depends where you go, of course :)  You have to get away from the roads, and in the Lakes that's difficult sometimes.

My lass is coming with me tomorrow for the first time; amazing forecast for the whole of the North of Britain, really, so I think I'll head back up to where I was a week or two ago and go up Mayar.  Easiest munro I've ever climbed, and there's a good chance of seeing the Golden Eagle she's so desperate to see up there.
        enjoy should be a great day. I remember when my other half used to go hillwalking.She gave up when pregnant with our son. He's now 22 !
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 19 September 2015, 04:31:18 PM
She's just done her first Munro :) didn't bother with Dreish, there was a hill race on and it was mad busy.

Amazing day but i wasn't really going for pictures, alas. Might have one or two :)

And two golden eagles :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 19 September 2015, 07:51:54 PM
You do well to get back in time for 4.30pm! it must be at least 7 hours driving there and back?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 19 September 2015, 08:16:25 PM
Aye, a bit more in fact. Left at just after 5.45, on the hill for 9.45, off the hill for 2.30 (after interminable numbers of stops climbing out of Corrie Fee and down the Kilbo path to let runners by), home with takeaway and beer just before 7 :)

I posted that message from Kinross services :)

No pictures today, though. Never seen the Highlands looking better but today was different, really enjoyed going up with my girl and all three dogs.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 19 September 2015, 08:56:59 PM
Ah my assumption, I assumed that you posted from home because I don't have a phone with internet being an old git.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 1 October 2015, 09:05:18 PM
Was in the Lakes on Saturday 26/09/2015. The weather for the country was for everybody to be basking in sunshine and nearing 20c but surprisingly the lakes was cloudy and overcast until late in the day when the sun made an appearance around 7pm just in time for it to disappear over the horizon. Took the van over with intention of doing two days and stayed overnight at Braithwaite campsite but however the intervention of man flu, the worst kind ever! left me lying around the campsite until 11.30am and driving home on what was a perfect day. The Saturday route had been parking half way down the road to Seathwaite and then walking backover taking the farm road to Thornythwaite farm and onto the fell taking the path up the shoulder up to Glaramara. I normally take the route up through Comb Door to Glaramara which is a throw back to my climbing days when we used it a down route after being on Raven crag and then onto Glaramara. From Glaramara I continued onto Pinnacle Bield and Allen Crags. From there I dropped down towards Angle tarn and then up towards the col between Esk Pike and Bowfell and then onto Bowfell before descending to the col and then up onto Esk Pike before descending to the shelter on Esk Hause. I then dropped down towards Sprinkling tarn and down Grains Gill and back to the van. Here's a few shots of the Saturday

Great End from Glaramara

(http://i.imgur.com/HimZV0Y.jpg?1)

Great Gable from the path from Glaramara to Allen Crags

 (http://i.imgur.com/si1z8EE.jpg?1)

Bowfell from Allen Crags

(http://i.imgur.com/VWlioLx.jpg?1)

Langdale hills from Allen Crags

(http://i.imgur.com/pac72uX.jpg?1)

Scafell (left ) and Scafell Pike (right ) from Bowfell

(http://i.imgur.com/SsTRFtH.jpg?1)

 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 1 October 2015, 09:12:36 PM
Looks great :thup: how many Wainwrights have you got done, or are you not counting?

I'm wavering between Ben Chonzie, Beinn Dearg (Atholl), Carn a' Chlamhain and Broad Cairn/Cairn Bannoch on Saturday.  Will be my last Scotland trip before going back to Skye later this month to hopefully get Blabheinn and at least Bruach na Frithe on the Cuillin ridge.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 1 October 2015, 09:33:44 PM
I've done the counter on walkhighlands for the wainwrights but I'm not really counting, I mainly use the Lakes for fitness. I should have been away at the minute, I was due to get the train up to Corrour yesterday morning and backpack for 12 days but this flu has left me literally on the floor.

You'll enjoy Beinn Dearg if you go that way, I did it in Oct 2012 on a fantastic autumn day. The track to the bothy from the car park at Old Bridge of Tilt is surprisingly fast and I believe I did the whole trip returning by the higher route, in 7 1/2 hours. It can be biked? Ben Chonzie is a shorter day which in my opinion you could save for a shorter winter day. whatever you do, enjoy, I think the weather is due to hold.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 11 October 2015, 10:52:38 AM
Lakes Thursday 8/102015.

Parked up in a lay by outside the village of Grasmere. The lay by is on the A591 and is free and popular. I was there for 9.30am and it was already filling up. Seems as though its not just me who is keen to avoid ridiculous parking fees and is prepared to walk an extra mile to avoid them. The weather at the time was warm and sunny. Took the road walk into Grasmere and turned right up Easdale road. You cant miss it, there is a wall with a rock painted white and the words "easdale tarn " together with an arrow painted on it. Despite all the years coming to the lakes I'd not been this way before. My route took me up towards Easdale tarn. I continued on the road and turned off at a foot bridge, there is a sign for the tarn. From there it is a straightforward track to the tarn and took about 1 12 hours from the car. As I continued to the tarn, a bit of "mizzle" mist and drizzle took over and was to continue for a few hours. At the tarn took the path going around the tarn for about 1/2 mile and took the ascending path that goes to the left of Blea crag onto Castle how. Took the photograph of Easdale tarn as I climbed. The picture shows the general gloominess that had descended.

(http://i.imgur.com/vB2Kbcq.jpg?1)

Up on Castle How felt as a bit of nostalgia creeping in. This was my first ever fell walk at the tender of age of 8 when my father took me. We had been camping at Chapel stile in Langdale and we walked over the fell to Stickle tarn and down to the New Dungeon Ghyll and back to the campsite. Now 45 years later this was the first time I'd been back on this particular bit of hillside. Continued along to Blea Rigg and then drpped down to Stickle tarn. As I walked the cloud began to lift a little but the drop again. I intended going up Pavey Ark by Jakes rake which you can just in the picture going from the top of the scree Shute from bottom right to top left. I knew it would be wet and with the time of the year greasy with no chance of drying out   

(http://i.imgur.com/6YZvSqr.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/fzPu7Xs.jpg?1)

The start of Jakes rake which as I thought was wet and greasy and in some bits a bit of running water. The rake is about 500 feet of ascent and holds your interest all the way. From memory there are more or less 3 scrambling sections before the final rocks and you cant go wrong as you follow the grooves up the rake. As the rock was wet and greasy the scrambling takes on a higher degree of competence and it takes a little while longer to look for flat footholds and putting your foot on sloping rock which would normally hold in the dry usually means your foot coming straight off. There were a few manoeuvre's that I wouldn't fancy reversing in the wet. Got to the top of the rake and then picked my way through the rocks to the top of Pavey Ark   

(http://i.imgur.com/XhAVZr6.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/c40HoKG.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/tbSUuyZ.jpg?1)

Continued from Pavey Ark doing a bit of fellwalking along to Thunacar Knott, to High Raise, Greenup edge and intended dropping down and going along to Helm crag but felt a bit knackered so continued down far easdale gill and dropped towards Grasmere and back to the car. Typically as I descended the sun came out and the temperature raised by about 5/6 degrees. All in 12 miles on hills some of which I hadn't been in a in long time

Harrison Stickle from Thunacar Knott

(http://i.imgur.com/EunWwFp.jpg?1)

The sugar dome of Pike of Stickle to the left and the band up to Bowfell from Thunacar Knott

(http://i.imgur.com/uUx6WmG.jpg?1)

The walk out to Grasmere

(http://i.imgur.com/ZXynYat.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 17 October 2015, 05:53:41 PM
Looks amazing :) Jack's Rake is officially Not For Me, though :lol:  One go was enough, even on a still and sunny day.  That said, I've been to Torridon since then so maybe I'll find it more convivial these days.

Skye next week; looks like I've missed the good weather by days but never mind: would still rather be there in the rain than here in the sun :)  forecast for Wednesday when i drive up is shocking so will pick a Munro which is suitable for that sort of day on the way over, then Blaven or Bruach na Frithe on Thursday which looks ok, then I think i might get Fionn Bheinn out of the way before a long drive home Friday.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 18 October 2015, 10:32:25 AM
I've just been up, came back yesterday and yes you have missed some great days. I was walking in a t shirt for 3 of the days. Went to Breamar and went up onto Lochnagar topping up on Carn a'Choire Bhoidheach, then went around to Aviemore and went up onto Ben Macdhui via the Fiacaill Buttress and back to Cairngorm, then drove up north and went onto Ben Hope before driving to Kintail and doing Carn Ghluasaid, Sgurr nan Conbhairean and Sail Chaorainn. Will post some pics when I get sorted.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 18 October 2015, 08:08:07 PM
How many is that now, then? Must be getting through them.

Looks like I'll get away with the Cairngorms area on Wednesday (hopefully Creag Meagaidh area which is on my way anyhow), Skye Thursday and wherever on Friday so i might do ok after all.  Looks like snow coming, though, which might spoil things a bit.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 18 October 2015, 08:45:42 PM
Got a 4 day pass on Monday and after checking the weather for the Highlands the east looked favourable so decided to head up initially to the Braemar area and get onto Lochnagar. Ironically I had been due to go this way in a backpack for 12 days starting on 30/09/2015 but had to give it a miss due to man flu. I had done Lochnagar in 2011 but inexplicably hadn't done the second munro of Carn a'Choire Bhoidheach despites it ease from the plateau. Parked in a lay by  on the road down from Glenshee in the campervan and kipped overnight. Parked up the next morning in the car park (£2.50 ) giving access to Loch Callater and began the walk in to the loch. I was passed on the way by several estate vehicles none of which stopped so I presumed I was OK for the  day. Got to the lodge and began the stalkers path circumnavigating Carn an t-Sagairt Mor. The weather had been good to start but began to cloud over but without rain.

View down Loch Callater towards Jocks road

(http://i.imgur.com/SRLMcxT.jpg?1)

Cairn Bannoch starting to appear through the clouds.

(http://i.imgur.com/IMvDUlA.jpg?1)

The Stuic through the clouds from Lochnagar summit

(http://i.imgur.com/LbrTrsM.jpg?2)

Looking back to Lochnagar from the Stuic.

(http://i.imgur.com/j6Mo4eJ.jpg?1)

After getting onto Carn a'Choire Bhoidheach  continued onto the lochnagar summit via the main path and then continued back to the car park via the same route. About 14 miles all in.

Wednesday 14/10/2015.

Had driven around from Braemar the previous evening to the Aviemore area because I knew I would be heading north and wanted to half the journey. Parked up in the sugarbowl car park overnight in company with two other vans. It will probably be the last time I use the car park due the pay and display. Drove up to the top car park in the morning. I intended going up into the corries and up onto Ben Macdhui which I,ve been on countless times but this time via the Fiacaill buttress which I hadn't done before . Walked from the car park on the path that takes you up onto Fiacaill Coire an t Sneachda and continued up the ridge towards the buttress. Continued up the rock, there is a bypass path cutting up through the scree but decided to continue on the rock which was safe enough with big footholds and handholds despite being greasy. Topped out and went onto the top of Cairn Lochan. The weather by now had closed in and stayed throughout the march over to Ben Macdhui. Stayed on the summit with another walker for 30 minutes waiting for the clouds to clear without luck.

(http://i.imgur.com/P5JHmGR.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/qtJIaGU.jpg?1)

Going down the weather started to clear and I took this zoom view of Braeriach as I walked and the cliifs of Carn Etchachan. The intial plan had been to drop down from Ben Macdhui to the car park but because of the weather change continued onto cairngorm and joined the tourists on the summit before dropping down sron an Aonaich

(http://i.imgur.com/SYkYrrz.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/CevghTO.jpg?1)

Looking across Coire an t Sneachda

(http://i.imgur.com/YBR9FWB.jpg?1)

Thursday 16/10/2015.

Had made the long drive up to Altnaharra to do Ben Hope. Had been here in August but was put off by road closure signs. Having read about it I now knew I could drive to within 2 miles of the normal start. Parked up overnight just past Vagastie on the Altnaarra road and kipped overnight before driving and parking at the broch at Altnacaillich and road walking the 2 miles to the start.

(http://i.imgur.com/zUqF9bz.jpg?1)

View east from the summit of Ben Hope.

(http://i.imgur.com/0vJrqrU.jpg?1)

View down the northern cliffs of Ben Hope.

(http://i.imgur.com/u3hyhUj.jpg?1)

Having not seen any stalking activity decided to make a day off it and continued around the corries to the spot height of 718 and then down Creag Riabhach before dropping back to the van

(http://i.imgur.com/snTRkfi.jpg?1)

View across to Ben Loyal

(http://i.imgur.com/J2N8jfS.jpg?1)

Friday 17/10/2015.

 Initially the forecast for the west had been poor for the second half of the week but a check revealed the high pressure staying in place so I drove down to Kintail and parked below the Loch Claunie dam to kip overnight. The temperature overnight dropped well below freezing resulting in a temperature inversion which stayed in the glen till around midday. Parked at Lundie and made the way up Carn Ghluasaid by an excellent stalkers path. From Carn Ghluasaid continued onto Sgurr nan Conbhairean and onto Sail Chaorainn before dropping back to the van

(http://i.imgur.com/f4oLWkJ.jpg?1)

Sgurr nan Conbhairean from Carn Ghluasaid

(http://i.imgur.com/UBaY5O6.jpg?1)

Back to Sgurr nan Conbhairean  from  Sail Chaorainn

(http://i.imgur.com/7wy7Obx.jpg?1)

A'Chralaig from  Sail Chaorainn



(http://i.imgur.com/VSiol2G.jpg?1)

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Monday 19 October 2015, 08:37:47 PM
Our not so great outdoors.

http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/tests-show-county-durham-dead-10291009

Everybody should sign this petition and try to put an end to the carnage on the grouse moors. https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/104441 and support this on twitter to give two fingers to the gamekeepers who will kill anything that moves https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/32476-justiceforannie
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 20 October 2015, 12:43:25 PM
How many is that now, then? Must be getting through them.

Looks like I'll get away with the Cairngorms area on Wednesday (hopefully Creag Meagaidh area which is on my way anyhow), Skye Thursday and wherever on Friday so i might do ok after all.  Looks like snow coming, though, which might spoil things a bit.


Sorry OC missed this part must have been when I was posting from imgur, Creag Meagaidh is a great hill, don't know which you are going but be aware that the A86 is closed at Laggan due to repairs, best check before you go. I'm now on 235. Got big plans for next may when I plan to blitz the Affric, Mullardoch, Strathfarrar and Fisherfield areas which should net 21 hopefully I,ll get them finished by next September.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 20 October 2015, 01:17:28 PM

Great advice because that's exactly where I was going :thup:

Might just have a leisurely but wet and windy drive up the West coast tomorrow, then, and just do something on Skye Thursday then Fionn Bheinn and back down the A9 Friday.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 20 October 2015, 02:10:10 PM
Yeah the A86 was closed when I was up there don't know the current situation, mind you cant win the A9 is a pain at the minute with the cameras and speed restrictions.

I was going to suggest you could do Creise and Meall a'Bhuiridh and use the chair lift or Stob a'Choire Odhair but I've just checked MWIS and the weather looks bloody awful! 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 20 October 2015, 03:13:21 PM
Aye, it's going to be hideous :lol:  Actual weather for Thursday looks decent other than 120mph summit winds :lol:  If it turns out that way (there's a chance it'll clear during Wednesday night, which would be nice) I might end up just having a wander down Glen Sligachan toward Loch Coruisk rather than going up high, and trust the Cuillins to protect me from the worst of it ; would still rather be there in a storm than here in good weather :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: TaylorJ_01 on Tuesday 20 October 2015, 03:30:08 PM
I love reading this thread but then also get sad that I'm not doing these things!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 20 October 2015, 03:35:47 PM
Then you must start doing them :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Tuesday 20 October 2015, 04:23:41 PM
I love reading this thread but then also get sad that I'm not doing these things!

Me too, the south of England doesn't have any experts on here I can steal ideas from.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 20 October 2015, 09:23:47 PM
I love reading this thread but then also get sad that I'm not doing these things!

Me too, the south of England doesn't have any experts on here I can steal ideas from.
      can you not get a trip north ?? Long weekend in the lakes even ??
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 20 October 2015, 09:45:37 PM
That's the solution, like :thup: even North Wales, although i don't know how much useful advice we can offer on that.  None, in my case :)

There's no useful advice on the south of England because there are no proper hills there :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 21 October 2015, 04:59:29 PM
I could have got a walk in on the way over, in fact. Bit drizzly but basically ok. Wind is picking up now, though, but looking like the worst of it will blow through overnight.

SD, if you're reading: i was kept off the top of Blaven last time by the wind. Would you say that Bruach na Frithe is an easier choice on a blowy day, or are they much of a muchness? I get the impression there's maybe less scree to negotiate, which would do me :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 21 October 2015, 07:44:35 PM
Oc it was the early 80,s I was last on brauch na frithe so memory is a bit sketchy however what I would say is that a walk into the corrie below might be a better bet if the weather is crap  because in my opinion you will see more of your options than you would on blaven , as the blaven one is straight up with only the shoulder as an option. Where you staying btw??
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 21 October 2015, 08:01:27 PM
Youth Hostel at Broadford, which is most convivial. Wind is nowhere near as strong as forecast so far.

Cheers :thup: was thinking along the same lines - the upper corrie on Blaven is going to be an awkward exit either way.  Haven't yet decided whether Bruach na Frithe is best approached from Sligachan or Glen Brittle.  The Brittle approach looked easy enough when i recce'd from the Fairy Pools but you're never sure :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 21 October 2015, 08:18:50 PM
Also Glen Brittle starts at 160m rather than sea level, which appeals to my lazy side :)

Definitely going to get Fionn Bheinn out of the way on Friday, looks like the sort of hill which is easily doable in rain and clag :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 21 October 2015, 09:06:33 PM
Fionn bheinn ,be prepared for a mud battle,I thought I could use the new road/track up the left of the burn but it was padlocked  at the bottom so it was boggy from the start, enjoy brauch na frithe it's probably the easiest way onto the ridge and if you get a clear day at least you could have a look around in "safety"
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 22 October 2015, 09:41:19 AM
I love reading this thread but then also get sad that I'm not doing these things!

Me too, the south of England doesn't have any experts on here I can steal ideas from.
   ianw you could try walkingforum.co.uk ,there are sections on the south of England. I know it's not Scotland or the lakes but it might give you some ideas if you want to get started. I would post a link but I,m on the kindle.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Thursday 22 October 2015, 11:09:40 AM
Cheers, I'll have a look :thup:

I was getting into trail running at one point, but my fitness is gone at then moment. There's an awesome series of coastal trail runs all around the UK.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 22 October 2015, 03:47:29 PM
Didn't do anything of note in the end, just drove around Skye doing little walks and getting pictures :)

Wind (which was insanely strong at sea level, conditions at 900m weren't even worth thinking about) didn't drop until around 1pm by which time i felt it too late to commit to a Skye Munro with the light going by 6. Never a disappointment coming up here though, the place is amazing and i have high hopes for some of the pictures - and if I'm honest, i like photography more than i like mountains.

That said still on for Fionn Bheinn tomorrow and given the forecast I'll probably just leave the camera in the car :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 22 October 2015, 05:21:52 PM
By way of example, this is the s*** phone version of Cuillins from Elgol :)  i have high hopes for the real camera version

(http://i.imgur.com/m50sOew.jpg)

Apologies if it's stupidly blurry, I'm on my phone so not sure how big the image actually is :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 22 October 2015, 07:38:28 PM
Bad luck with the weather OC ,hopefully you,'ll get a good day tomorrow. Sometime you'll get a good run of weather on skye :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 22 October 2015, 07:45:04 PM
It could be worse; just means i have to keep coming back :lol:  I don't mind, really. Pretty sure I've got some decent pictures and they're my primary motivation :) 

It was beautiful from around 2pm to sunset.  Based on progress last time i could probably have managed Blaven but that path back to the road goes pretty close to the gorge and i wouldn't have fancied it in the dark :)

Tomorrow looks to be windy and rainy, so a dull and easy hill is definitively the order of the day
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Friday 23 October 2015, 09:46:54 AM
No you did right,the days are short at the minute. With your eye for a camera shot and your liking of dramatic scenery you should have a trip to Arran particularly in the autumn.It would be a shorter drive too
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 23 October 2015, 01:09:00 PM

Had to get home earlier than I expected so no munros this trip (never mind).  A few roadside views from Skye, though.

Elgol Beach
(http://i.imgur.com/yRo6naT.jpg)

The Storr
(http://i.imgur.com/T6fGPky.jpg)

Beinn Edra
(http://i.imgur.com/Ua2QujM.jpg)

Bioda Buidhe
(http://i.imgur.com/TN49UEI.jpg)

The Quiraing
(http://i.imgur.com/2yfyf0s.jpg)

Red Cuillin
(http://i.imgur.com/goW8QXv.jpg)

Marsco
(http://i.imgur.com/NjZS5Ca.jpg)

Elgol Beach, later
(http://i.imgur.com/yc872Se.jpg)

Black Cuillin
(http://i.imgur.com/mMyEmpD.jpg)

I'm happy to drive 600 miles and spend a couple of nights in the smallest room I've ever been in, for scenes like this :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 24 October 2015, 10:10:19 AM
Nice shots Oc Elgol beach towards the Cuillin is always a classic. Pity you didn't get onto the hills ,still as you say it's reason to go back, one of these days you'll get a good run of weather!!!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 24 October 2015, 10:37:46 AM
I wouldn't put money on it :lol:  Doesn't matter though, just being there and among it is enough for me.  I don't get summit fever so much any more (the Cheviots have taught me that the walk is more important than the tops you get to) so although it'd be nice to tick a few more off, I'm never too downhearted if I don't :)

Properly processed versions of the above

(http://i.imgur.com/CXXQauG.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/CFhDF1s.jpg)

Really pleased with the Beinn Edra one; might see if I can tidy it up even more and maybe break the walkhighlands competition hegemony with it next month :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 3 November 2015, 09:12:15 PM
Hegemony ,I had to look it up, best of luck with that, Jupes photo will take some beating.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 3 November 2015, 09:15:18 PM
Some photos of the Derwent walk Ebchester Monday 02/11/2015. I was out with the dog around 8am and missed the best shots, so went out later and tried some but the sun was too high. Love this time  of year. :lol:

(http://i.imgur.com/1iocsdx.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/2YAs4Yc.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/IKebzyz.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 3 November 2015, 09:27:46 PM
Was over the lakes today. Went from Seathwaite and up to Styhead tarn. Went over the Great Gable girdle traverse which I was pleasantly surprised with, up onto Kirkfell and then onto Great Gable and down by the breast route. Will post a proper report when I get sorted. Here's some pics just for starters.

Clouds starting to gather on the girdle path looking towards Great End

(http://i.imgur.com/NYtZnu1.jpg?2)

Cloud inversion over Ennerdale.

(http://i.imgur.com/dk55nmn.jpg?1)

 I was on Great gable for 1pm and it was T shirt weather so I sat for an hour. As I waited the cloud started to roll in and I took these photos of the cloud dropping like water over Black Sail pass. Wish I had the skills and equipment!!

(http://i.imgur.com/ueXheD7.jpg?1)

 (http://i.imgur.com/M5BIvtb.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/NiwZLtT.jpg?1)

Zoomed shot, about 3 miles of Illgill Head over Wastwater

(http://i.imgur.com/Fvmw5WS.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 3 November 2015, 09:33:51 PM

Tremendous :thup:  Love a good inversion, have never ever had a camera with me when I've seen one :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 3 November 2015, 10:27:32 PM
Thanks for that, will post more when I get sorted. have you not been out since Skye?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 4 November 2015, 06:52:08 AM
Nope, I've been back to work and spent the weekend with a classical guitar and a metronome :)  Think I'll have this weekend off as well (looks windy, I've had enough of that for a while), and look to get back out after that.  Ben Chonzie time.  Maybe Geal Charn at Laggan.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Sunday 8 November 2015, 09:23:26 PM
I'm thinking about going to Skye in December for a long weekend, what's it like at this time of year?  I'm not sure whether to give it a go or try somewhere closer as it's as good as a day to travel each way.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 9 November 2015, 06:50:25 PM
I should imagine it's similarly unpredictable to the rest of the year, unfortunately, but even more savage when it's bad. But if you get lucky, there aren't many places that measure up to it. Where are you looking to stay?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Monday 9 November 2015, 09:20:36 PM
I should imagine it's similarly unpredictable to the rest of the year, unfortunately, but even more savage when it's bad. But if you get lucky, there aren't many places that measure up to it. Where are you looking to stay?


I haven't decided yet, Dunvegan is probably where I'd prefer but Portree has more to offer for facilities and only half an hour away.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 9 November 2015, 09:42:02 PM
Aye, i would go Portree personally, if only for easy access to the amazing Trotternish peninsula which is probably my favourite part of the island (though the Cuillins take some beating).  Dunvegan isn't that much further out as you say, but would probably feel fairly remote as a place to stay.

Depends what you're going for, of course :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Mick on Monday 9 November 2015, 10:02:06 PM
Aye, i would go Portree personally, if only for easy access to the amazing Trotternish peninsula which is probably my favourite part of the island (though the Cuillins take some beating).  Dunvegan isn't that much further out as you say, but would probably feel fairly remote as a place to stay.

Depends what you're going for, of course :)


I'll be going to blow the dust off my photography gear, I haven't used it in months.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 13 November 2015, 07:43:57 AM

Cheviot and Hedgehope a beautiful shimmering white this morning :aww:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 23 November 2015, 10:55:35 AM
Had a bit of time off and given the recent snowfall I thought I'd have a look up the road.  The mountains are beautiful as you might imagine :)  I had a specific objective in mind, though - photograph of the North Face of Ben Nevis from Carn Mor Dearg across the corrie.

As soon as I got into the sunlight toward the top of Carn Beag Dearg, though, it became obvious that my photo mission was doomed to failure because I hadn't considered the low winter sun which was making a monster silhouette of the North Face.  So I turned around, headed down and went for a walk up to the CIC hut in the corrie instead, and although the view from down there isn't so spectacular, at least it was visible :)

(http://i.imgur.com/0j9SQ9y.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/iychzDB.png)

(http://i.imgur.com/916yBG7.jpg)

Great walk all the same - forgot how cold it gets and how strength sapping it is to wade through soft snow and tangled heather, and the CIC hut is always unexpectedly further away and more difficult to reach than I think :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 24 November 2015, 07:59:54 PM
Nice shots OC looks absolutely Baltic. I don't think the winter sun ever gets into the north side. Strange seeing these ,I was looking on Youtube last night at stuff on the Ledge route which I fancy next year when the snows gone. Its always nice to get a trip away.

I'm guessing you stayed at the YHA in Glen Nevis?. Its a beautiful glen. When its a crap day I often have a walk  from the car park at the end of the road down the end of the glen through to the Steall waterfall and the wire bridge.

I'm laid off at the minute. Shagged my left knee 10 days ago cutting some logs for the fire and maybe need another week or so before I trust it on a hill, Youtube will have to do for now!!  :sad:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 24 November 2015, 08:17:16 PM
My legs are absolutely buggered from the walk, the snow and heather on Carn Beag Dearg were really hard work, shudder to think how much pain I might be in if i'd gone on to CMD.  The steep and pathless descent to the Allt a'Mhuilinn probably didn't help either :)

I stayed in Aviemore as usual - just an hour or so from Fort William and the most comfortable beds in Scotland, in the private rooms at least :) and the trip down the A9 first thing is easier than the 82, if the weather doesn't allow for a second day walking. I think aviemore and kingussie are just about perfect bases if you know you're walking in Scotland but haven't quite decided where yet :)

And i was up there between around 11 and 1 and i would say the closest the sun got to Coire Leis was around 900m up on the CMD side.  It won't get any sun for a good few months now :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Wednesday 25 November 2015, 09:59:02 AM
Both times I've been on CMD and the arete I've gone straight up from the CIC hut. Hard work but I don't think there is an easy slope around there. I know what you mean about the Aviemore area. It's my favourite Highland town and if I could , I would live up there.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 25 November 2015, 06:57:21 PM

Aye, same.  Me and my lass have tentative plans to retire somewhere between Newtonmore and Aviemore, would love to think we could get away with it while I'm still fit enough for the Cairngorms :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 14 December 2015, 08:04:42 PM
Just had a short break in the Highlands. I haven't been out on the hills since early November and hadn't been to Scotland since mid October. Drove up in the van on Friday and parked up in a picnic site on the shores of Loch Iubhair to be near the starting point of tomorrows hills Sgiath Chuil and Meall Glas. The weather forecast looked promising with low winds, the promise of sunshine and high clouds. Saturday started gloomy and the sky looked full of snow. Took the private road through Auchnessan and then took the right hand side path up through the fields and up through the woods. The snow level was about 1500 feet and was once into it was wet shin deep and soft. Not ideal walking as you make your way across the moor to the slopes.  Another walker caught me up and I was pleased to let him past so he broke trail up onto Sgiath Chuil. Once on the top I didn't hang around as it was around 11.45 and there was still a fair way to go. The recommended route is straight down into the gap between the two hills a drop of around 1000ft into a boggy area and then re ascend up the nose of Beinn Cheataich and then onto Meall Glas. I climbed up to the base of the nose and didn't fancy the ascent so walked across the corrie to the north shoulder and ascended there, for the first time meeting some firm snow. From there it was a further 3/4 mile to Meall Glas. I was on the top of the hill at 14.30hrs and knew it would be dark around 16.30hrs so cracked on over the endless moor back to the starting point.

Across the glen to Ben More

(http://i.imgur.com/F5mZ1im.jpg?1)

Near the top of Sgiath Chuil

(http://i.imgur.com/U3OaPGy.jpg?1)

The nose of Beinn Cheataich

(http://i.imgur.com/o0AZT7L.jpg?1)

Meall Glas from Beinn Cheataich. Ben Challum off to the right.

(http://i.imgur.com/3tmF3BT.jpg?1)

Yours truly on the summit of Meall Glas

(http://i.imgur.com/TN0dc7k.jpg?1)

Looking East from the summit of Meall Glas

(http://i.imgur.com/hXUD6UJ.jpg?1)

On Saturday night I slept in the van at Dalrigh about 1 mile short of Tyndrum. I knew the forecast was for -5 so I reckoned on not driving in the morning, leaving the van there and walking up the west Highland way to Kirton farm the start point for Ben Challum. It was cold overnight, the taps freezing in the van. On the morning walked the half mile to Kirton farm and then up past the two cemetery's before striking up the hill, past the fences and keeping going up, pretty uneventful. Got to the south top and was walking in decent snow to the top of Ben Challum before reversing the same route and returning to the farm in five hours.

Zoomed shot of Ben Cruachan from the lower slopes of Ben Challum.

(http://i.imgur.com/4URk5Hp.jpg?1)

Zoomed shot of Ben Lui

(http://i.imgur.com/Tvv5lW4.jpg?1)

Shot of Ben Challum taken from the south top

(http://i.imgur.com/JWqJenT.jpg?1)

shot in reverse

(http://i.imgur.com/kYbQpoK.jpg?1)

Ben More and Stob Binnien from the south top

(http://i.imgur.com/KiXwJdc.jpg?1).

Stayed overnight in the picnic spot again as I couldn't find a forecast so was unsure of Mondays weather, in the event it snowed and rained overnight with the result that it was quite slushy at road level and the mist was down to 100 feet so came home. Chipping away at those munros, now on 238. 


Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 15 December 2015, 12:45:01 PM

Outstanding :thup:  Ben Lui looks amazing in the snow.

I've got a four day weekend coming up, hoping that Ben Chonzie will be looking clear one day.  Still can't quite work out how to get there, though.. the Glen Turret approach looks better but the road is very unclear on maps.  The western approach looks easier to find, but also looks pretty damned dull :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 15 December 2015, 03:37:22 PM
Thanks for that. I did Ben Chonzie from Glen Turret parking up and sleeping at the dam. You take the turn off from the A85 between Comrie and Loch Earn just outside Comrie, it's signposted I believe for the dam. The road goes past the Grouse distillery and then from memory takes a left turn before some houses. The road is not in great condition although it was April 2013 when I was there.The walk in to the hill is easy ,alongside the loch and then up with  the slopes of the hill always in site. Are you going to scout out some more YH or stick to Aviemore?, it was absolutely freezing overnight even in the van and I have come back with a stinking head cold so some decent overnight accommodation is a must
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 15 December 2015, 05:31:49 PM

I've used Aviemore, Torridon and Broadford so far.. Aviemore has the beating of all others, and is fairly central for just about everywhere :)  Would just do Chonzie as a there-and-back-in-a-day though, I should imagine; that part of Scotland is only three hours from me.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Tuesday 15 December 2015, 07:27:46 PM
I use the bunkhouse when I'm up that way but I might givesome of the SYHA a try sometime, although it won't be until next September as I've got my trips sorted for next year.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Saturday 19 December 2015, 07:39:35 PM
Outstanding stuff snoopdawg, looks amazing.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 19 December 2015, 08:40:51 PM
Thanks for that Pedro, I,m paying for the trip though, came back with a stinking head cold!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 27 December 2015, 06:40:52 PM
If you're reading, snoopdawg, I'm heading for Ben Chonzie tomorrow early doors and I've never been there and have no idea about the snow conditions.  Forecast is dry and potentially clear summits but strong winds.

The Turret approach looks a good deal more interesting than the Lednock one, although marginally longer, but I'll be travelling alone as usual and the avalanche risk has only just been downgraded from considerable to moderate: that said, South East aspects were clear and the steepest part of the Turret route is up a slope with precisely that orientation.  If you know the area well, would you say that the Turret approach carries enough of an avalanche risk to go by Lednock instead..?

If there's strong wind and lying snow there's a good chance I'll turn around above the snowline anyway to be honest (despite ski goggles I get the fear in spindrift high up by myself, I've not summited very many winter Munros although I suspect this is as benign a one as I could hope to find) :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 27 December 2015, 08:23:19 PM
You do choose your days!! Just checked MWIS and metcheck and the winds are forecast for 50/60 mph with gusts up to 90mph. It's your call but I think I would rather be elsewhere on such a day! If you are going I've just read a  Glencoe trip report and from the photos the snow level would seem to be about 1700ft. I have only done Ben Chonzie from Glen Turret. The path by the loch is easy and then it's a climb up through an open gully area up to an open col. When I did it I used crampons from that point. The slopes from the col are very much like the Cheviots and I think you follow the fenceline from the col. The fence will be handy as with the wind you are likely to be looking at your feet! As I said it's your choice, I was thinking of the Lakes tomorrow but the wind has put me off, I d rather wait for a more settled day.  Without seeing the snow levels on the southern slopes I wouldn't like to comment on the avalanche risk.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Sunday 27 December 2015, 08:25:54 PM
When I said a climb through an open gully it's very open and the slopes none too steep. It's about the hen hole angle
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 27 December 2015, 08:54:55 PM
That's a much worse forecast than this morning; will probably give it a miss if that's the latest :)

Cheers man :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 28 December 2015, 08:08:12 PM
OC you're going to hate me!,there's a trip report for today on  Ben Chonzie on walkhighlands. It's looks windy but must have been doable ,sorry !!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 28 December 2015, 08:31:41 PM
went to simonside with my parents instead, it was nice :) noticed that the wind seemed a good way short of the forecast :) if I saw the forecast I would have bailed so the trip was unlikely anyway

No matter, I reckon Ben Chonzie will still be there when I go :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Wednesday 30 December 2015, 05:14:34 PM

New Year's Day looking good :smitten:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 31 December 2015, 04:58:49 PM
Go for it!!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 31 December 2015, 05:03:34 PM
I will be :)  Up at half four, away for six.. quality New Year :)  Working on the principle that Glen Turret is the better option since there don't seem to be any burn crossings that way and it looked spating from Lednock side

It looks like about four or five hours in good conditions so I'll see how I get on :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 31 December 2015, 05:06:27 PM

That said, the forecast is for snow and ice and the carpark is about 350m up so I don't know if I'll even get there :anguish:

f*** it, though, I'm going somewhere
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 31 December 2015, 05:23:23 PM
I read the trip report on walkhighlands on Ben Chonzie from the Ledknock side,I wouldn't fancy that river crossing. Can't remember any problems with river crossings from Glen Turret when I did it. As I said go for it you might get decent views. Got to admire you're get up and go, don't think I've ever done a Scottish day trip



Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 31 December 2015, 05:48:45 PM
I live near Wooler though; much easier for me than you :) if the weather has the road closed I'll go back to Schiehallion or somewhere :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 31 December 2015, 07:05:32 PM
Have you done Ben Vorlich??,not too far from Comrie and probably easier to get to if there's problems with the roads
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 31 December 2015, 07:24:27 PM
Aye, that was my first Munro that wasn't Ben Nevis (so, my second Munro :lol:), was pleasantly easy and then I went across to Stuc a' Chroin which was less so :)

The Atholl ones are probably too long for short winter days, they're the only ones in that neck of the woods I haven't been to (unless there are any short easy days around Glen Lyon).  Alternatively I haven't been to Beinn Tulaichan (sp?) or Cruach Ardrain but I'd be approaching them from the South and the gradients thereabouts are relentless if Stob Binnein is anything to go by.  It looks fairly well pathless from the South as well.

..final option for a new hill is Meall nan Tarmachan next to Lawers, but if I can't get to the Loch Turret carpark the chances are I won't get to Lawers either.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 31 December 2015, 08:07:41 PM
Meall Ghaordaidh ,I've not done but its a short 6 mile day from Glen Lochay.

Sgiath Chuil and Meall Glas which I was on two weeks ago, would be tough day with all the driving.

Carn a'Chlamain from Blair Atholl could be done with a bike.

If you are able to get round the back of Ben Lawers , Meall Corranaich & Meall a'Choire Leith from the reservoir is a good short winter round with a decent level ridge walk.

I'm assuming you haven't been on any of these. Whatever you do enjoy the day.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 1 January 2016, 09:58:39 AM
Approach is impassable so I'm heading for Geal Charn at Drumochter which should be an easy option :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 1 January 2016, 05:10:26 PM
Took long enough to find the bloody road up to Loch Turret, no signposting at all after you get off the main road and you just have to guess around the Famous Grouse distillery :rolleyes:  Got about three quarters of the way up the approach road (past a little dam and some houses); after that was thick ice all over the road so alas Chonzie will have to wait a little bit longer.

Given the state of that road I thought I'd limit my options to ones which were literally next to main roads and I couldn't be arsed to climb Ben More so I thought I'd go for an easier day on Geal Charn with the little peak of Creagan Mor at just under 800m next to it.  MWIS had forecast 90% chance of clear summits for the Cairngorms so I fancied my chances.. I could tell passing Atholl that Drumochter was clouded over but when I got parked at Balsporran Geal Charn was, amazingly, clear despite the menacing skies.  There were hundreds of people heading up the normal approach so I decided to go with my more inventive route to Creagan Mor then around Coire Beul an Sporran instead.  I got a couple of shots on the way up to Creagan Mor but it clouded over as I got down to the bealach between the two hills (was really hoping for That Shot of Ben Alder over Loch Ericht which I think would have been outstanding today) and I climbed Geal Charn in fairly heavy cloud behind another enterprising soul who had broken trail for me the whole way :)

I had been considering pushing on from Geal Charn toward A'Mharconaich or at least coming down the estate road from the bealach between the two but with the weather as it was (bitterly cold, clouded over, getting very windy) I decided to follow the trade route straight back down instead.  Easy enough round with not a great deal of ascent but I didn't get there until around 10 after my exploits at Loch Turret so I didn't want to commit to anything too epic.  First winter Munro for a long time and it was pleasant enough although the snow was drifted to waist deep in places (as I say, though, I followed somebody else so they fell in the holes for me).  Took somewhere between three and a half and four hours which I didn't feel was bad going for the snow depth above around 700m - memory map reckons a regular round in ordinary conditions would take two and a half hours.  Enjoyed it a lot and it started to snow literally as I opened the car door on my return, which is always a good feeling :)

West Drumochter hills (Geal Charn itself not included since it's a bit of a boring one; my descent is the ridge leading out of shot on the right).  Menacing low level clouds building in the south, where the wind was coming from :anguish:
(http://i.imgur.com/y2Jg5mM.jpg)

East Drumochter hills
(http://i.imgur.com/vEPYK5S.jpg)

Approaching Creagan Mor summit, a familiar Cairngorms scene
(http://i.imgur.com/sqg7uip.jpg)

East Drumochter whiting out at around 800m just before West Drumochter did, from somewhere near Creagan Mor summit
(http://i.imgur.com/RHDu75d.jpg)

Very quiet roads as well, another massive plus :)  Took around three hours to get back from Drumochter, which is pretty good going.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 2 January 2016, 10:24:07 AM
Well done OC for your perseverance. It takes some effort to do all that driving and do hillwalking. I've driven home after a day on the hills and get very stiff legs at the end of the journey so I take my hat off to you. The shots are good, the snow looks a bit thin in places??.    That road up the Turret dam is a pain I recall having to reverse back from the houses after missing the turn, still it's another one to go back for. I might not be up Scotland for a while, ill wait for the weather to settle down.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 2 January 2016, 11:00:16 AM
Snow was mostly just an inch or two from the carpark at 450m, and by 900m was probably 10-12 inches away from the heather tops; felt mostly new and the wind was keeping it moving. Not a lot of frozen stuff; i used the crampons from the top of Creagan Mor but could probably have got away without them.  Where it had drifted it was as much as four feet I would say.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 9 January 2016, 12:06:31 PM
Been desperate to get out lately. Its been 3 weeks since Scotland but it seems longer. Been checking MWIS lately to try and find a decent day. Friday morning seemed a bit wet and cloudy with the day changing around midday to drier but cold. Set off yesterday a bit later than normal and got to Seathwaite around 09.45hrs after a bit of a to do with a farmer and his landrover on the road down from Seatoller to Seathwaite. It was raining on arrival so waterproofs were on from the start. Set off along the track to Stockley bridge then up the trade route up to Styhead tarn. At this stage I could see that the snow level was down to around 1300 feet and the cloud not much above it. The rain continued turning to sleet and occasional hailstones as I climbed. I brought my ice axe but intentionally left the crampons in the car after studying picture's during the week. The snow as I climbed was wet turning a bit firmer around the col on Lingmell. Snow depth on top of Scafell Pike was around 2". Continued onto the top. The wind was around 20 mph gusting to 40mph. Temperature was around -3 and visibility down to 50 metres. Didn't hang around much on the top due the conditions and went back via Broad crag, Esk Hause and Styhead tarn getting back to the car at 4.15pm.     

The ground just after the rock step the Corridor route

(http://i.imgur.com/UL7Y5Mw.jpg?1)

Looking down Piers Gill

(http://i.imgur.com/bd2Ug85.jpg?1)

The route across to Piers Gill

(http://i.imgur.com/tCJdvVx.jpg?1)

Lingmell through the gloom from the Shoulder

(http://i.imgur.com/akMKQCl.jpg?1)

visibility on the top

(http://i.imgur.com/4YLOov1.jpg?1)

Scafell Pike top

(http://i.imgur.com/yLQbau9.jpg?1)

Sprinkling tarn

(http://i.imgur.com/YjoaQ8l.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Saturday 9 January 2016, 03:03:35 PM
Lol you must be f'ing mental! ;) You probably drove past our house, I'd have put the kettle on.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 9 January 2016, 03:54:42 PM

Aye, I wouldn't have done the corridor in those conditions like.  Good stuff :thup:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Monday 11 January 2016, 03:54:15 PM
Something a bit more bucolic for me; a genuine Northumbrian classic hillwalking day, and on Hedgehope, the hill that started it all for me :aww:  Had an unplanned day off work and was guessing I'd have to spend most of it arguing with doctors.  As it happened, business was resolved fairly quickly and on the drive back from Rothbury it was fairly clear that I was going to have to go walking :)

The path from the top of the Ingram / Breamish valley is well known to a lot of North East scenery lovers as the way to the fabled (but disappointing if you ask me) Linhope Spout, one of very few waterfalls in the Cheviots.  However, the more intrepid can carry on past that path on estate tracks to tackle Hedgehope, second highest of the Cheviots at 714m and the source of the burn which feeds the aforementioned Linhope Spout.

Leaving the car at the road end, you're already in fairly deserted countryside with the steep-sided Breamish Valley behind blocking any sign of civilisation.  Some of the smaller central Cheviot hills are around here, like Shill Moor.  The long downhill start to the day is a grim portent for how the day will end.
(http://i.imgur.com/LT1pUAZ.jpg)

At Linhope itself, the map and situation on the ground aren't entirely clear.  The path looks like it continues straight through the grounds of whatever big old house is at the bottom of the road, but the actual footpath takes a left and circumvents that house, climbing round the side of Ritto Hill.  At the top of this fairly steep and rough little hill, the path to Linhope Spout branches right and in summer this is where you'd leave the crowd (most of whom will be thinking that you're lost).  A couple of yards further up the hill and you see Hedgehope properly for the first time.
(http://i.imgur.com/vIZGnah.jpg)

Crossing the grouse moor for around a kilometre and crossing a river brings you to the foot of Hedgehope and the start of the ascent proper, with around 400m of climbing to do.
(http://i.imgur.com/FCZDhRt.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/M0Gg48u.jpg)

The track is for farm vehicles, really, and after rain it is filthy :lol:
(http://i.imgur.com/x7P3Tqb.jpg)

The stony top dome of Hedgehope keeps disappearing from view but feels, encouragingly, much closer every time it reappears.
(http://i.imgur.com/LweIxCa.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/wbF1jR7.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/GmvU1Rz.jpg)

There's no doubt where Cheviot itself is in conditions like this; that extra 100m makes all the difference
(http://i.imgur.com/yDAMRhl.jpg)

The views of the National Park as you approach the summit are great - as long as you like wide open spaces and no pointy mountains :)
(http://i.imgur.com/HDU6RdH.jpg)

The top cairn is across a couple of hundred metres of plateau which was today frozen solid and difficult to walk across (left my crampons at home thinking I wouldn't need them).  Hedgehope is one of very few hills in the Cheviots that feels like it comes to a definite top, and this huge cairn is visible from miles and miles away as a tiny nipple on the top of the hill :)
(http://i.imgur.com/efAeIYF.jpg)

Cheviot from Hedgehope - that extra hundred metres again, the snowline was fairly easy to place at around 675m today
(http://i.imgur.com/ASV1IVu.jpg)


Hedgehope does not have spectacular views, alas, although it's the best of the Cheviots for viewing South East Northumberland.  A bit of summit ambience:
(http://i.imgur.com/BvIh8uB.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/hQm6Yah.jpg)

The National Park on the way back down.  This place doesn't have the drama of Scotland or the Lakes, but it has a feel all its own which most closely resembles the Southern Cairngorms
(http://i.imgur.com/8zneDTg.jpg)

The easiest way down is to reverse the route of ascent although there are plenty of alternatives to make things more circular - particularly going by Dunmoor Hill in dry conditions is a good way to avoid that reascent on the road at the start (although of course you have to ascent Dunmoor instead, which is much the finer option).

About 13km and somewhere in the region of 700m of ascent, given the reascents required on the way back.  That's a reasonable day and would put you on top of a few Munros, not to mention Wainwrights :)  Conditions were awkwardly soft then slippery today so it took me a bit more than three and a half hours; I should imagine most reasonably fit folk would do it in closer to three.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pbxtn on Thursday 14 January 2016, 01:05:37 PM
Are there any decent phone apps you guys use for walking which show distances, routes and difficulty etc?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 14 January 2016, 05:09:40 PM
Sorry can't help, I still use a phone that hasn't got a camera!,I use maps and books to work it out and also walkhighlands website has a mapping facility that gives you distance and ascent.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 14 January 2016, 05:30:21 PM
Same, maps and books and more lately websites.  I use Memory Map to plan routes, which does distances and ascent and which also folds an OS map into 3D for "flythrough" purposes, which is very useful.  Google Earth is also good for getting a sense of the land in advance but won't tell you how far you're going along or up.  Walkhighlands is a great place to start, and also includes England and Wales.

Difficulty is a fairly subjective thing though, there are so many different things that can make it awkward to get around which some people will struggle with, and some people won't (difficult terrain? extreme exposure? massive difficulty in navigation due to featureless terrain and no paths? unbridged rivers to cross?); you just have to start somewhere that looks doable and work your way up, or take somebody with you who knows what they're doing.

It's easy enough to download someone else's gps file to a phone and use an app like Viewranger to follow it, but it's not something I'd ever particularly recommend.. you should always go on your own terms and know where you are and where you're headed (and how to get back, most importantly).  Where mountains are involved, it can be worryingly easy to find yourself having ascended something that you can't even begin to imagine having to go back down :anguish:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pbxtn on Thursday 14 January 2016, 05:40:09 PM
Thanks for the replies. I'll check out the names you've mentioned.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 14 January 2016, 05:42:31 PM

Walkhighlands is a great place to start, full route descriptions with photos :thup:  They have difficulty grades but as I say they're so tenuous as to be of extremely limited value (the bog rating is much more useful).
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Thursday 14 January 2016, 07:42:44 PM
I went walking the North Downs Way at the weekend, not a good time to start. Whole thing was inches deep in mud, fell over twice, gave up half way through the planned route. Nice to get some fresh air, but much less relaxing than planned!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 14 January 2016, 07:46:42 PM
Try it on a frosty morning it will be a whole new ball game. High pressure predicted this weekend, might be perfect conditions for what is normally muddy conditions.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 14 January 2016, 07:57:21 PM
Friend of mine wanting to have a look up the winter Cheviots this weekend. Given the state of the roads around here tonight, I'll be amazed if we can get within 10 miles of the road ends, which is always the problem with the Cheviots
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 16 January 2016, 07:22:48 PM
Off to the Lakes at 7am tomorrow morning. East looks best so I might give Fairfield a go from Hartsop parking area, up Dovedale, Fairfield, Cofa pike and finish by St Sundays crag.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 16 January 2016, 09:40:10 PM
I'm going into the Cheviots with a couple of lads from work who fancy the snow experience.. they may change their minds after three or four miles of postholing through soft thigh deep snow and tangled heather
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 17 January 2016, 04:36:35 PM
Great day on Newton Tors in the end, enjoyed it a lot and the strong wind picking up spindrift from the snowfields gave it an ambience of much greater seriousness than it actually was.

Five hours on a hill that would normally take two and a half, the snow and heather combo was indeed a delaying factor.

Two dead on Bidean nam Bian I see; that mountain is a real killer, seems to take people every year :(
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 17 January 2016, 07:30:55 PM
Incredible pictures as always OC. Outstanding.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 18 January 2016, 09:44:16 PM
Some pics from Fairfield from Brotherswater on Sunday 16/01/2016

Angletarn pikes over Brotherswater

(http://i.imgur.com/NuUgu9l.jpg?1)

Dovedale looking towards Dove crag

(http://i.imgur.com/TiR0Pkm.jpg?1)

Looking down the valley

(http://i.imgur.com/NsL3GTW.jpg?1)

Looking up towards the rock path

(http://i.imgur.com/Xtn1vyn.jpg?1)

Looking down the rock path

(http://i.imgur.com/QXpMcBV.jpg?1)

The col leading to Hart crag

(http://i.imgur.com/Onc0pgS.jpg?2)

Visibility up to Fairfield

(http://i.imgur.com/pVERRCS.jpg?1)

Top of Fairfield

(http://i.imgur.com/YSvfvZu.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Tuesday 19 January 2016, 06:25:30 PM
Looks grim.. nice one on getting up there :thup: the Cheviots were bitterly cold but absolutely beautiful other than a big menacing cap cloud that sat over Cheviot, and nothing else, all day.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pedro111 on Sunday 24 January 2016, 01:58:55 PM
Great pictures Snoopdawg, ive no idea how you two find your way with snow that deep tbh.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Sunday 24 January 2016, 07:38:32 PM
I generally just go places that I already know like the back of my hand, and think carefully about proceeding if the mist comes down :) I probably would have turned around on Snoop's walk, truth be told :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Monday 25 January 2016, 10:59:19 AM
Great pictures Snoopdawg, ive no idea how you two find your way with snow that deep tbh.

Thanks for that. Knowing the lie of the land  and previous knowledge helps, building up the confidence to go into whiteout conditions is something you build up over the years. You might laugh but I seem to have an inbuilt compass. If I am on new ground I generally use a map to have a look at the lie of the land, after that the map rarely comes out. You can use all sorts of things to determine your way, like ridge lines, old walls, reading crags off maps, wind direction, natural sense of direction, watercourses, tarns or lochans and cairns off which there are massive amounts particularly in the lakes. I learned to read maps doing orienteering when I was in my teens. 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 11 February 2016, 01:58:44 PM

Returned to Fairfield yesterday for some unfinished business after the last trip on 16/01/2016 when the intention had been to go onto Cofa Pike and St Sundays crag


Got to the parking area at Cows bridge to find a walking group about 25 strong parked in the parking area. As I attempted to drive in as you can access the other parking area over the bridge the group did its best to walk as slow as possible about 4 across the road at a time. They seemed to be walking to Hartsop direction. In the valley it was like spring with sunshine and warmish temperatures.
Set off around 9.45hrs and took the previous route alongside Brotherswater to the farm and then the upper route through Dovedale. As I climbed higher onto the open hillside I could see the results of the storms with debris and landslips everywhere. Where the valley path meets the higher path there was a footbridge which is now flattened. The stream can be forded for anybody going that way. The temperature was warm and I had to open the pit zips of my jacket.
I got to the rock staircase and once starting to climb started to find that the steps, as they were in the shade of Dove crag, were ice covered. Once up rather than continuing up the pathway I skirted left and walked up the lower slopes of Dove crag. There was plenty of snow but it was good enough for foot placement. I climbed as high as the rock and then contoured left to meet the pathway of the Fairfield horseshoe.
The temperature had changed now the warmness of the valley long gone. From there I followed the track over Hart crag into the windy col and then climbed the slopes onto Fairfield. The top of Fairfield was very icy and bare of snow. The wind by now had started to gust requiring further clothing as I stopped for a rest.
I went over to inspect the slopes down to Cofa pike and met a walker coming up who had turned back. He stated that he had seen one person going that way. I sat down and removed my mitts which I just bought to fix the crampons on. Having put the right one on I found that the fastening buckle strap on the left crampon had snapped off the buckle fastening it to the crampon. As I attempted to fasten it a strong gust blew up and one of mitts blew out of my pocket and started to blow over Fairfield. Not wanting to lose it I gave chase abandoning the loose crampon, rucksack containing vehicle keys, ice axe and walking pole. I caught up with the mitt and returned to where I had been, thinking as I walked I hope that the other gear hadn't blown away. Thankfully they hadn't.
 I managed, by manoeuvring the strap around to secure the left crampon and set off to the col before the climb up the first pinnacle of Cofa pike. Ice axe in one hand and walking pole I climbed over the first pinnacle, then Cofa Pike itself before the 500 feet drop down to the col ,where I removed the crampons and then walked up St Sundays crag. The top of St Sundays crag was icy.
From there I always ignore the path back to Glenridding and instead made my way over to Gavel Pike as I wanted to drop into Deepdale to get back towards the car. I normally go down the ridge of Gavel Pike but the snow slopes to the left of Gavel Pike were in the shade and looked good for a quick descent so I dropped down that way,dropping out of the snow around 1400 feet. From there its a case of making you're own way down over the grass until you meet a ATV track which drops down to the valley. From there you follow the track out of the valley to the road and then I returned to the car at 3.30pm via the road. There is a path over the fence by the road but I always find it wet and filthy so I avoid it.
Drove home in the daylight for a change and on getting home heard the unmistakable sound of a hissing punctured car tyre. They say things happen in threes, the crampon strap and puncture, I wonder what's next?

All in an excellent winter round. Fairfield is probably one of my favourite Lakeland hills, I will return time and time again.

Storm damage. What's left of the footbridge where the upper path meets the valley path

(http://i.imgur.com/87jMsxj.jpg?1)

Dove crag

(http://i.imgur.com/5fA5G42.jpg?1)

Back to Brotherswater and debris from the storms

(http://i.imgur.com/hYGImdH.jpg?1)

The rock staircase

(http://i.imgur.com/ljujrg7.jpg?1)

Staircase from above

(http://i.imgur.com/7I6FxUp.jpg?1)

Looking across to Hartsop from the slopes of Dove crag.

(http://i.imgur.com/wCUZ2Gw.jpg?1)

Looking west from the slopes of Hart crag

(http://i.imgur.com/eGdDU6B.jpg?1)

Catstyecam from Hart crag

(http://i.imgur.com/kke3msW.jpg?1)

St Sundays crag

(http://i.imgur.com/KzaCZUv.jpg?1)

Top of Fairfield looking south

(http://i.imgur.com/9oOL2BF.jpg?1)

First pinnacle of Cofa Pike looking back to Fairfield

(http://i.imgur.com/FJwrT5a.jpg?1)

Wider shot.

(http://i.imgur.com/lruxO6S.jpg?1)

Cofa pike

(http://i.imgur.com/1DBKBqF.jpg?1)

Back to Cofa Pike and Fairfield from St Sundays crag

(http://i.imgur.com/SVvZnoP.jpg?1)

Ullswater from Gavel Pike.

(http://i.imgur.com/ODHv9Zj.jpg?1)

 



 
 

 

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Thursday 11 February 2016, 06:44:07 PM

Nice :thup:  Fairfield is an unsung hero in the lakes, definitely.  I also think that the High Crag / High Stile / Red Pike traverse are underrated gems over there.  Do you have any other favourites that aren't necessarily among the popular ones?  Always wanted to get up Grasmoor but never managed anything around there other than the two little ones from Newlands Hause, the other side to Robinson, the names of which I forget.

Heading up to Drumochter on Saturday, weather permitting, with a friend who wants to get a winter Munro in but doesn't have full winter gear.  Not sure if it's going to be possible or not, but if anywhere is doable it's going to be Geal-charn by the track to the bealach with A'Mharconaich then North to the summit.  Will see how it goes; if we have to turn around due to excess slippiness it'll not be the end of the world.

Currently selling my SLR gear (again) after deciding that it is after all just too bulky (which I knew really, but I missed it).  Will be going back to a Sony RX100 I think, best little camera I've ever used.  No pictures from the forthcoming trip, though, or phone ones only :anguish:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Thursday 11 February 2016, 09:07:48 PM
Thanks I always like to fit Fairfield in especially by this route. Favourites? I would say doing Helvellyn via sticks pass instead of heading for the popular ridges or Pillar from Gatesgarth or the Newlands round using the shoulder of Grasmoor as the ascent route.

If you are stuck for an easy hill this weekend why not give Glas Tulaichean a try from the Spittal of Dalmunzie?. Once up past the derelict lodge its a straightforward 4 x 4 track to within 100 feet of the summit. The departure from the track is marked with a cairn.

I carry a Pentax optio compact. Its not perfect but it was cheap (£ 100 ) off Ebay and is waterproof, great for backpacking. I looked at your sony choice but didn't fancy paying the price

Whatever you do this weekend enjoy. 
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pbxtn on Friday 12 February 2016, 07:31:35 AM
Currently selling my SLR gear (again) after deciding that it is after all just too bulky (which I knew really, but I missed it).  Will be going back to a Sony RX100 I think, best little camera I've ever used.  No pictures from the forthcoming trip, though, or phone ones only :anguish:

Give it a year and you'll be back again  :lol:

Nice photos snoopdawg, particularly like the second one and the one where the sun is behind the peak making it seem like it's glowing  O0
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 12 February 2016, 05:48:47 PM
Currently selling my SLR gear (again) after deciding that it is after all just too bulky (which I knew really, but I missed it).  Will be going back to a Sony RX100 I think, best little camera I've ever used.  No pictures from the forthcoming trip, though, or phone ones only :anguish:

Give it a year and you'll be back again  :lol:

Nice photos snoopdawg, particularly like the second one and the one where the sun is behind the peak making it seem like it's glowing  O0

Nah, it's really too big to justify carrying in the winter, which is exactly why I got rid first time :lol:  RX100 quality is more than good enough..

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7548/16062155719_76775ceb88_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/qtmKii)

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7511/15937546835_49a0c3775b_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/qhm6qg)

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5602/15012222803_d27db20898_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/oSzyPD)

..I only returned it because it developed a fault and in a moment of madness started looking at how much a 30D would cost :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: pbxtn on Friday 12 February 2016, 06:05:30 PM
Aye I can understand when you can get images like that tbh. I think everything about a dslr is great, except the size. You going for the mk1 or a newer model?
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 12 February 2016, 07:17:31 PM

Nah, the 1 will do me just fine and for £250 new these days it's really not a bad price at all.  This is assuming that I can sell the 17-70, of course :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: ope on Saturday 13 February 2016, 05:05:11 PM
Lush out on the fjord today.



Spoiler
(https://scontent.fsvg1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/v/t34.0-12/12696222_10153992223224390_659022345_n.jpg?oh=b13e5ccb419668adf6130caef25da38c&oe=56C25135)

Spoiler
(https://scontent.fsvg1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t34.0-12/12735900_10153992223279390_847913240_n.jpg?oh=98901e5760100440c57dd59ec5600c2b&oe=56C14F19)

Spoiler
(https://scontent.fsvg1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/v/t34.0-12/12696010_10153992223349390_1963311260_n.jpg?oh=4df0e63102a9739542f8219d6e140fa4&oe=56C15EF5)

Spoiler
(https://scontent.fsvg1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xft1/v/t34.0-12/12746101_10153992236159390_84250854_n.jpg?oh=d14230959e9a4486b90d4ff1c4994c27&oe=56C14E70)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Friday 26 February 2016, 06:39:09 AM
Pictures gone ope..?

Still had no sun for the RX100, but a few from Windy Gyle yesterday under leaden winter skies that were spitting snow the whole way up and down

(http://i.imgur.com/pQmXc5Q.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/5kwhd2g.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/lBCmnHW.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/7UuzQKn.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/HVdOKYe.jpg)

RX100 is definitely not as good as the old 30D with the Sigma 17-70 at 100% pixel level - but it's more than good enough looking at these, and so much more convenient for this style of photography :)

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 27 February 2016, 12:45:12 PM
Looks a decent day, I was on the Corridor route, Scafell pike and Great end on 25/02/2016. Here's some pics. Probably going to Catstyecam, Swirral edge, Helvellyn tomorrow to catch the last of the ice.

(http://i.imgur.com/71YHkQy.jpg?1)

 (http://i.imgur.com/jkeVtH9.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/SayNMuI.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/wOUjYTY.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/8SIN2w0.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/tR5hcOS.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/wBMsO3f.jpg?1)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Saturday 27 February 2016, 01:46:02 PM
It's been maybe five years since I wandered up Scafell, and a few evenings ago the wife asked if I fancied doing it this summer. Nah. I'll leave it for you boys. 👍
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 February 2016, 02:44:58 PM
Just driving back from a sparkling, pristine winter day at Drumochter. Positively suntanned :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: Ian W on Saturday 27 February 2016, 02:45:39 PM
The Instagram photos are amazing, looks like you're on the moon!
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 February 2016, 02:48:49 PM
## edit
That didn't work :) will post from home
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 February 2016, 05:32:53 PM
It's been maybe five years since I wandered up Scafell, and a few evenings ago the wife asked if I fancied doing it this summer. Nah. I'll leave it for you boys. 👍

It's about the same since I've been there, aye, and I haven't felt the desire to go back either (at least not in the summer - maybe in the middle of winter like SD does).  I'm spoiled by living so close to Scotland; just an extra twenty minutes or half hour on what it'd take me to drive to Scafell Pike and I could be at Stob Binnein, or Ben Lawers, or Schiehallion, and there's really no comparison :)  Was a genuine epiphany moment when I realised that I could climb so many Scottish mountains as day trips :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 February 2016, 05:44:38 PM
Anyway.  Drove up there specifically to see the view from Geal-Charn summit in the winter, denied to me on New Year's Day by cloudy conditions.  Was absolutely worth it :)

Geal-Charn from the bottom.. well, from the car park at approximately 450 metres :shifty:
(http://i.imgur.com/PUmY8ON.jpg)

Original choice of summit was A'Mharconaich, but I didn't have time for both and from memory the view isn't quite as good
(http://i.imgur.com/vlSgYxW.jpg)

Panorama of what I presume are the Northern Cairngorms but can't really identify any of them.  The one that looks like a breaking wave might be the Sgor Gaoithe ridge but I'm not sure.  SD?
(http://i.imgur.com/jWbgkqS.jpg)

Geal-Charn summit view of Loch Ericht and the Ben Alder hills beyond.  Astonishing, probably my second favourite view in the UK :)
(http://i.imgur.com/KOETrPz.jpg)

Leaving Geal-Charn summit
(http://i.imgur.com/b7D7PmB.jpg)

RX100 has acquitted itself well :)  So much easier to use on days like this than a full SLR kit :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Saturday 27 February 2016, 06:27:27 PM
It's been maybe five years since I wandered up Scafell, and a few evenings ago the wife asked if I fancied doing it this summer. Nah. I'll leave it for you boys. 👍

It's about the same since I've been there, aye, and I haven't felt the desire to go back either (at least not in the summer - maybe in the middle of winter like SD does).  I'm spoiled by living so close to Scotland; just an extra twenty minutes or half hour on what it'd take me to drive to Scafell Pike and I could be at Stob Binnein, or Ben Lawers, or Schiehallion, and there's really no comparison :)  Was a genuine epiphany moment when I realised that I could climb so many Scottish mountains as day trips :)

For all my lack of desire to visit these places I do enjoy the pictures in this thread, it's one of my most viewed in the chat section.

Re: summer hill wanking, last time I was on Scafell me and the Mrs set off from home at about a quarter to six to get to Wasdale for six and beat the rush. We were just near the top when a guy walked off a ledge to our west and fell about sixty foot! (Apologies for my lack of proper terminology here) His head was smashed in and his femur was sticking out of his arse! We stayed with him til the air ambulance arrived then as we walked back down we counted the air ambulance make half a dozen trips ferrying casualties down the mountain. Stay safe kids. :)
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 February 2016, 06:34:55 PM
Oof, can spoil your day like I posted a tale about a silly f***er getting hypothermia on Ben Nevis in August a couple of years back. There's nothing quite like getting involved in a mountain emergency :)

Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: henke on Saturday 27 February 2016, 07:23:09 PM
I noticed the air ambulance has what I'd call a site box, a big secure metal store near the top of Scafell. Full of equipment and supplies for when folk break themselves. :lol:
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: OpenC on Saturday 27 February 2016, 07:42:29 PM
Aye, there's another one at Styhead Tarn between Great Gable and Scafell Pike :) never seen one in Scotland; they could probably do with one or two given the number of people who die in Scotland every winter.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors
Post by: snoopdawg on Saturday 27 February 2016, 07:45:58 PM
I noticed the air ambulance has what I'd call a site box, a big secure metal store near the top of Scafell. Full of equipment and supplies for when folk break themselves. :lol:

Its a mountain rescue stretcher box, been there since way before air ambulances, used by mountain rescue teams.
Title: Re: The Great Outdoors