Poll

What do you think will be the outcome of the General Election?

Conservatives win increased majority
28 (26.7%)
Conservatives retain small majority
59 (56.2%)
Hung parliament
14 (13.3%)
Labour win majority
4 (3.8%)

Total Members Voted: 105

Voting closed: Wednesday 7 June 2017, 11:51:33 PM

Author Topic: UK Politics: The Tory Years - 2015-17  (Read 557995 times)

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20200 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 12:50:57 PM »
Is Laura having a small funny turn of is she being embarrassed by Sky News?

http://www.bbc.com/news/election-2017-39973399

Quote
Conservative manifesto: Lack of costings leave blanks to be filled in

Laura Kuenssberg
Political editor
2 hours ago

Labour is crying foul this morning.
The Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell says he's angry the Conservatives haven't given out full costings for their manifesto.
Labour of course, did show us their sums at their launch earlier in the week, and they are on the warpath.
The Tories are vulnerable to claims their plans would hit millions of people, because they will not give out the details of how their plans would actually work.

On the winter fuel allowance, for example, experts like the Resolution Foundation believe the only realistic way to introduce means testing is to limit the benefit to pensioners who get pensions credit.
To do otherwise would be an administrative palaver, would create costs and would only give limited savings.
But use that system, and five out of six pensioners would lose out, which translates to 10 million people - yes, you read that right, 10 million.
In that scenario, only people entitled to pension credit would keep the benefit - those with a family income of less than £159.35 a week if they're on their own, or £243.45 for couples.
Open to suspicions
Tory sources suggest that is not the intention at all, that they will create a new means test instead, implying that the numbers won't be as large.
But they won't give any more detail than that; the plan is instead to produce a draft version of the new rules, a Green Paper, if they win, and then consult on the best way to do it.
Without being specific of course, they do leave themselves open to suspicions about their true intentions.
The same is true on their plans for social care.
How many more people will be asked to pay? How exactly will the proposed system work? They are making big promises but again the plan is to produce a Green Paper if they win, then work it out.
Again, on immigration there are questions about detail - ministers won't put a timetable on when they think they will actually (finally) get net migration down to the tens of thousands.
It is not unusual not to produce detailed breakdowns of every policy cost in manifestos.
They are broad contracts with the electorate, and no politician wants to set themselves too many tests that are impossible to pass later.
Labour is often under more pressure to show their numbers because, traditionally, they are considered to be behind on economic credibility.
I remember the Greens, too, in the last election, going to huge efforts to show they were a serious force to be reckoned with by publishing their numbers and an independent audit alongside.
That didn't save Natalie Bennett, the then leader, from quite an awkward moment when we asked her how she planned to spend one billion pounds on 'The Earth', as their spreadsheet suggested.
But some of Theresa May's plans have plenty of blanks to be filled in.
And if the Tories won't, then others will and questions will keep being posed.
Guessing will go on
Just as George Osborne was asked again, and again, and again, in the last election about how on earth he would make £12bn of welfare cuts, the Tories will keep getting asked this time round exactly what their plans will be.
This morning, David Davis said that numbers doing the rounds this morning were just "guesswork". But that is exactly the issue - for as long as they don't give the full details, the guessing will go on.
PS: On where the numbers end up on winter fuel allowance, if the Tories win, one of the most interesting things is that Theresa May would be dipping her toe in challenging the gap between young and old.
In the last few years, pensioner incomes have been continually protected, many would argue at the expense of the younger generation.
Part of this manifesto seeks to start to reverse that, which is a fundamental shift.
The former Treasury adviser and well respected policy wonk Torsten Bell has explored that a bit here.
People should not be afraid of their governments, governments should be afraid of their people.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20201 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 01:13:59 PM »
Is anyone watching QT. That posh angry tory boy is amazing :lol:


BlufPurdi

  • Administrator
  • Speaking truth to stupid since 2005.
Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20202 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 01:15:50 PM »
Incredibly apt.  :lol:
You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.
We ourselves are responsible for our own happiness and misery. We create our own Heaven. We create our own Hell. We are the architects of our own fate.
Student says " I am very discouraged. What should I do?" Master says, "encourage others."
We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.
It takes a wise man to learn from his mistakes, but an even wiser man to learn from others.
This is what should be done. By one who is skilled in goodness, and who knows the path of peace: Let them be able and upright, straightforward and gentle in speech. Humble and not conceited, contented and easily satisfied. Unburdened with duties and frugal in their ways. Peaceful and calm, and wise and skillful, not proud and demanding in nature. Let them not do the slightest thing that the wise would later reprove.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20203 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 01:27:47 PM »
So with this new "death tax" what happens if you transfer your house to your kid(s) well before you get old/ill? Surely then you'd have no assets and the state would end up paying?

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20204 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 01:30:31 PM »
Labour up to 34% in latest poll, only 1% less than Tony Blair won with in 2005...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/jeremy-corbyn-gains-conservatives-new-ipsos-mori-labour-party-tories-election-2017-a7742536.html
That Tory manifesto is the most complacent piece of claptrap I've seen. They're trying to make it all about repeating the Brexit vote and it appears the public are catching on.

The Independent have been knocking these opinion poll stories out every day. Not sure how much I believe them. They seem to have gone very clickbaity, at least their online stuff.

BlufPurdi

  • Administrator
  • Speaking truth to stupid since 2005.
Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20205 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 01:35:23 PM »
The proof is in the poll data, doesn't matter what the Indy say.  Although, accept your point on the clickbait quality of their content/article titles.  It's actually an incredibly awful outlet now.  Often have stuff that's weeks old on the front page, does my box in.  Every single article has grammar or spelling errors to the point it's clear that no-one proof reads a f***ing thing.  So bad, but still has a couple of the best reporters going, somehow. 
You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.
We ourselves are responsible for our own happiness and misery. We create our own Heaven. We create our own Hell. We are the architects of our own fate.
Student says " I am very discouraged. What should I do?" Master says, "encourage others."
We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.
It takes a wise man to learn from his mistakes, but an even wiser man to learn from others.
This is what should be done. By one who is skilled in goodness, and who knows the path of peace: Let them be able and upright, straightforward and gentle in speech. Humble and not conceited, contented and easily satisfied. Unburdened with duties and frugal in their ways. Peaceful and calm, and wise and skillful, not proud and demanding in nature. Let them not do the slightest thing that the wise would later reprove.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20206 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 01:51:30 PM »
The more I see of the Tory campaign and now manifesto had the polls been closer I'd be convinced that they were trying to throw the thing so that a LabLib coalition had to handle Brexit and the inevitable fallout, Tories plan to swoop back in after 5 years for another dynasty of chaos and death.
So raise your fists and march around
Dont dare take what you need
I'll jail and bury those committed
And smother the rest in greed
Crawl with me into tomorrow
Or i'll drag you to your grave
I'm deep inside your children
They'll betray you in my name

Sleep now in the fire

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20207 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 02:32:46 PM »
The proof is in the poll data, doesn't matter what the Indy say.  Although, accept your point on the clickbait quality of their content/article titles.  It's actually an incredibly awful outlet now.  Often have stuff that's weeks old on the front page, does my box in.  Every single article has grammar or spelling errors to the point it's clear that no-one proof reads a f***ing thing.  So bad, but still has a couple of the best reporters going, somehow. 


It's online only now, no??
People should not be afraid of their governments, governments should be afraid of their people.

TBG

  • King of GIF. WHAT?
Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20208 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 02:40:54 PM »
Quote
A FRAMEWORK FOR DATA AND THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
Some people say that it is not for government to regulate when it comes to technology and the internet. We disagree. While we cannot create this framework alone, it is for government, not private companies, to protect the security of people and ensure the fairness of the rules by which people and businesses abide. Nor do we agree that the risks of such an approach outweigh the potential benefits. It is in the interests of stable markets that consumers are protected from abusive behaviour, that money is able to flow freely and securely, and that competition between businesses takes place on a level playing field. It is in no-one’s interest for the foundations of strong societies and stable democracies – the rule of law, privacy and security – to be undermined.

So we will establish a regulatory framework in law to underpin our digital charter and to ensure that digital companies, social media platforms and content providers abide by these principles. We will introduce a sanctions regime to ensure compliance, giving regulators the ability to fine or prosecute those companies that fail in their legal duties, and to order the removal of content where it clearly breaches UK law. We will also create a power in law for government to introduce an industry-wide levy from social media companies and communication service providers to support awareness and preventative activity to counter internet harms, just as is already the case with the gambling industry.

Just as we led the world in regulating embryology thirty years ago, we know that if we create the right system of governance for the digital economy and use of data, we will attract the right businesses who want to become the global centre for data use and research.

Take that extremist perverts
Benitez will be gone before the end of October.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20209 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 02:45:48 PM »
They haven't got a f***ing clue.
Gimme-gimme-gimme-gimme-gimme some Ganja!

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20210 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 03:35:03 PM »
Quote
A FRAMEWORK FOR DATA AND THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
Some people say that it is not for government to regulate when it comes to technology and the internet. We disagree. While we cannot create this framework alone, it is for government, not private companies, to protect the security of people and ensure the fairness of the rules by which people and businesses abide. Nor do we agree that the risks of such an approach outweigh the potential benefits. It is in the interests of stable markets that consumers are protected from abusive behaviour, that money is able to flow freely and securely, and that competition between businesses takes place on a level playing field. It is in no-one’s interest for the foundations of strong societies and stable democracies – the rule of law, privacy and security – to be undermined.

So we will establish a regulatory framework in law to underpin our digital charter and to ensure that digital companies, social media platforms and content providers abide by these principles. We will introduce a sanctions regime to ensure compliance, giving regulators the ability to fine or prosecute those companies that fail in their legal duties, and to order the removal of content where it clearly breaches UK law. We will also create a power in law for government to introduce an industry-wide levy from social media companies and communication service providers to support awareness and preventative activity to counter internet harms, just as is already the case with the gambling industry.

Just as we led the world in regulating embryology thirty years ago, we know that if we create the right system of governance for the digital economy and use of data, we will attract the right businesses who want to become the global centre for data use and research.

Take that extremist perverts

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/theresa-may-internet-conservatives-government-a7744176.html

Utter fucknuckles.

Goes hand in hand with them wanting to regulate and control every sodding aspect going forward. They are absolutely frightening, but people crawl to them because of the fear they and the media have drip fed us over the last decade that putting the country on lock-down is the only way to keep us 'safe'. Deluded/power crazed/ignorant c***s. Good luck with making an Internet for England.
"Newcastle is a strange club and I don't know what else you can say about them" - Ferguson.

Toondave

  • I, Toondave
Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20211 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 03:39:23 PM »
Stupid neoliberal freemarket regulatory loving ultraconservatives ey



GeordieMessiah

  • Forum Colossus
  • Suck it up, bitch!
Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20212 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 03:40:15 PM »
Quote
A FRAMEWORK FOR DATA AND THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
Some people say that it is not for government to regulate when it comes to technology and the internet. We disagree. While we cannot create this framework alone, it is for government, not private companies, to protect the security of people and ensure the fairness of the rules by which people and businesses abide. Nor do we agree that the risks of such an approach outweigh the potential benefits. It is in the interests of stable markets that consumers are protected from abusive behaviour, that money is able to flow freely and securely, and that competition between businesses takes place on a level playing field. It is in no-one’s interest for the foundations of strong societies and stable democracies – the rule of law, privacy and security – to be undermined.

So we will establish a regulatory framework in law to underpin our digital charter and to ensure that digital companies, social media platforms and content providers abide by these principles. We will introduce a sanctions regime to ensure compliance, giving regulators the ability to fine or prosecute those companies that fail in their legal duties, and to order the removal of content where it clearly breaches UK law. We will also create a power in law for government to introduce an industry-wide levy from social media companies and communication service providers to support awareness and preventative activity to counter internet harms, just as is already the case with the gambling industry.

Just as we led the world in regulating embryology thirty years ago, we know that if we create the right system of governance for the digital economy and use of data, we will attract the right businesses who want to become the global centre for data use and research.

Take that extremist perverts

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/theresa-may-internet-conservatives-government-a7744176.html

Utter fucknuckles.

Goes hand in hand with them wanting to regulate and control every sodding aspect going forward. They are absolutely frightening, but people crawl to them because of the fear they and the media have drip fed us over the last decade that putting the country on lock-down is the only way to keep us 'safe'. Deluded/power crazed/ignorant c***s. Good luck with making an Internet for England.

Funny how they don't want to regulate the press, though, isn't it? https://inforrm.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/the-tories-hand-the-press-their-get-out-of-jail-free-card-brian-cathcart/
"Football violence will continue as long as they're shitting in our shoes and we're pissing in their Bovril" - Billy Connolly

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20213 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 03:44:05 PM »
Quote
A FRAMEWORK FOR DATA AND THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
Some people say that it is not for government to regulate when it comes to technology and the internet. We disagree. While we cannot create this framework alone, it is for government, not private companies, to protect the security of people and ensure the fairness of the rules by which people and businesses abide. Nor do we agree that the risks of such an approach outweigh the potential benefits. It is in the interests of stable markets that consumers are protected from abusive behaviour, that money is able to flow freely and securely, and that competition between businesses takes place on a level playing field. It is in no-one’s interest for the foundations of strong societies and stable democracies – the rule of law, privacy and security – to be undermined.

So we will establish a regulatory framework in law to underpin our digital charter and to ensure that digital companies, social media platforms and content providers abide by these principles. We will introduce a sanctions regime to ensure compliance, giving regulators the ability to fine or prosecute those companies that fail in their legal duties, and to order the removal of content where it clearly breaches UK law. We will also create a power in law for government to introduce an industry-wide levy from social media companies and communication service providers to support awareness and preventative activity to counter internet harms, just as is already the case with the gambling industry.

Just as we led the world in regulating embryology thirty years ago, we know that if we create the right system of governance for the digital economy and use of data, we will attract the right businesses who want to become the global centre for data use and research.

Take that extremist perverts

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/theresa-may-internet-conservatives-government-a7744176.html

Utter fucknuckles.

Goes hand in hand with them wanting to regulate and control every sodding aspect going forward. They are absolutely frightening, but people crawl to them because of the fear they and the media have drip fed us over the last decade that putting the country on lock-down is the only way to keep us 'safe'. Deluded/power crazed/ignorant c***s. Good luck with making an Internet for England.

Funny how they don't want to regulate the press, though, isn't it? https://inforrm.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/the-tories-hand-the-press-their-get-out-of-jail-free-card-brian-cathcart/

Hilarious. :angryfire:
"Newcastle is a strange club and I don't know what else you can say about them" - Ferguson.

BlufPurdi

  • Administrator
  • Speaking truth to stupid since 2005.
Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20214 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 04:05:36 PM »
The proof is in the poll data, doesn't matter what the Indy say.  Although, accept your point on the clickbait quality of their content/article titles.  It's actually an incredibly awful outlet now.  Often have stuff that's weeks old on the front page, does my box in.  Every single article has grammar or spelling errors to the point it's clear that no-one proof reads a f***ing thing.  So bad, but still has a couple of the best reporters going, somehow. 


It's online only now, no??

Yeah? 
You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.
We ourselves are responsible for our own happiness and misery. We create our own Heaven. We create our own Hell. We are the architects of our own fate.
Student says " I am very discouraged. What should I do?" Master says, "encourage others."
We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.
It takes a wise man to learn from his mistakes, but an even wiser man to learn from others.
This is what should be done. By one who is skilled in goodness, and who knows the path of peace: Let them be able and upright, straightforward and gentle in speech. Humble and not conceited, contented and easily satisfied. Unburdened with duties and frugal in their ways. Peaceful and calm, and wise and skillful, not proud and demanding in nature. Let them not do the slightest thing that the wise would later reprove.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20215 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 04:51:48 PM »
Tory or not, their plans for Internet regulations look terrifying.  It's a continuation from the slippery slope they recently started on down. 

How this appeals to anyone, let alone the politically incorrect types that swarmed to UKIP and are now drifting to the Tories, I do not know.

Not going to lie I actually agree with a lot that's in their manifesto. Some of the motivations behind this are good in my opinion, especially with regards to ensuring news companies get a fair share of advertising revenue. Whether the cure is worse than the disease though is another question (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/theresa-may-internet-conservatives-government-a7744176.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-38333249).

Still not voting for them, ironically because this election is essentially about brexit and i think her strategy here has some serious flaws.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20216 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 04:55:06 PM »
Labour up to 34% in latest poll, only 1% less than Tony Blair won with in 2005...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/jeremy-corbyn-gains-conservatives-new-ipsos-mori-labour-party-tories-election-2017-a7742536.html
That Tory manifesto is the most complacent piece of claptrap I've seen. They're trying to make it all about repeating the Brexit vote and it appears the public are catching on.

The Independent have been knocking these opinion poll stories out every day. Not sure how much I believe them. They seem to have gone very clickbaity, at least their online stuff.

I know its a f***ing travesty.

One poll means nothing, I assume you know about this? http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/

(@bluf) If all the polls start to narrow (which they have slightly but not enough) then something is happening.
« Last Edit: Friday 19 May 2017, 05:05:09 PM by louistoon »

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20217 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 05:03:41 PM »
Jezza's down with da kids


Toondave

  • I, Toondave
Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20218 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 05:05:28 PM »

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20219 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 05:11:19 PM »
Labour up to 34% in latest poll, only 1% less than Tony Blair won with in 2005...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/jeremy-corbyn-gains-conservatives-new-ipsos-mori-labour-party-tories-election-2017-a7742536.html
That Tory manifesto is the most complacent piece of claptrap I've seen. They're trying to make it all about repeating the Brexit vote and it appears the public are catching on.

The Independent have been knocking these opinion poll stories out every day. Not sure how much I believe them. They seem to have gone very clickbaity, at least their online stuff.

I know its a f***ing travesty.

One poll means nothing, I assume you know about this? http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/

(@bluf) If all the polls start to narrow (which they have slightly but not enough) then something is happening.

Not so much that the Independent are trying to mislead people (Bluf), just that we now know polls are often bollocks.

For example, that blog is written by someone from Yougov, didn't they poll the 2015 election catastrophically wrong? Though it does seem to be a good read.

It's really sad to see the decline of the Independent into what it's becoming. It used to be one of the better ones overall.

BlufPurdi

  • Administrator
  • Speaking truth to stupid since 2005.
Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20220 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 05:16:53 PM »
Tory or not, their plans for Internet regulations look terrifying.  It's a continuation from the slippery slope they recently started on down. 

How this appeals to anyone, let alone the politically incorrect types that swarmed to UKIP and are now drifting to the Tories, I do not know.

Not going to lie I actually agree with a lot that's in their manifesto. Some of the motivations behind this are good in my opinion, especially with regards to ensuring news companies get a fair share of advertising revenue. Whether the cure is worse than the disease though is another question (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/theresa-may-internet-conservatives-government-a7744176.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-38333249).

Still not voting for them, ironically because this election is essentially about brexit and i think her strategy here has some serious flaws.

Yeah, but I'm clearly not talking about news organisations collecting a fair share of advertising revenue.  It's about a continuation from the Investigatory Powers Act, their lack of logic when it comes to these things.

Quote
The new rules would include laws that make it harder than ever to access pornographic and other websites. The government will be able to place restrictions on seeing adult content and any exceptions would have to be justified to ministers, the manifesto suggests.

There's also the precedent of it all.  The Tories may not go on to abuse these new powers and proposed powers, but they can and, ultimately, someone will.  We already heard Cameron et all talking about how subversive and destructive conspiratorial websites are, with some mentioning that they should be banned.  They can now do stuff like this, if they win and follow what they've proposed.  That's also ignoring the fact a British conservative Internet sounds like the stuff of nightmares.  And boredom. 

No one is going to argue against rhetoric condemning online bullying, abuse etc, but pretending regulating the internet is going to sort that out is fantasy land stuff.  Deal with the root causes. 
« Last Edit: Friday 19 May 2017, 05:27:19 PM by BlufPurdi »
You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.
We ourselves are responsible for our own happiness and misery. We create our own Heaven. We create our own Hell. We are the architects of our own fate.
Student says " I am very discouraged. What should I do?" Master says, "encourage others."
We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.
It takes a wise man to learn from his mistakes, but an even wiser man to learn from others.
This is what should be done. By one who is skilled in goodness, and who knows the path of peace: Let them be able and upright, straightforward and gentle in speech. Humble and not conceited, contented and easily satisfied. Unburdened with duties and frugal in their ways. Peaceful and calm, and wise and skillful, not proud and demanding in nature. Let them not do the slightest thing that the wise would later reprove.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20221 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 05:25:45 PM »
Jezza's down with da kids



That's actually fairly laid back and charming.

Compare and contrast to Miliband getting down with the kids in his Brand interview, or any interview where any form of human has to speak to Teresa May.
"Newcastle is a strange club and I don't know what else you can say about them" - Ferguson.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20222 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 05:27:13 PM »
Labour up to 34% in latest poll, only 1% less than Tony Blair won with in 2005...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/jeremy-corbyn-gains-conservatives-new-ipsos-mori-labour-party-tories-election-2017-a7742536.html
That Tory manifesto is the most complacent piece of claptrap I've seen. They're trying to make it all about repeating the Brexit vote and it appears the public are catching on.

The Independent have been knocking these opinion poll stories out every day. Not sure how much I believe them. They seem to have gone very clickbaity, at least their online stuff.

I know its a f***ing travesty.

One poll means nothing, I assume you know about this? http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/

(@bluf) If all the polls start to narrow (which they have slightly but not enough) then something is happening.

Not so much that the Independent are trying to mislead people (Bluf), just that we now know polls are often bollocks.

For example, that blog is written by someone from Yougov, didn't they poll the 2015 election catastrophically wrong? Though it does seem to be a good read.

It's really sad to see the decline of the Independent into what it's becoming. It used to be one of the better ones overall.

I don't think you can just look at the fact that he happens to work for a pollster that got stuff wrong and conclude he must know s***, as all polls use different methodologies to correct for essentially unknown quantities such as voter turnout, thus just because their methodology may have been wrong during the last election, it doesn't necessarily follow that they know f*** all. The problem with the polls, is that in periods where there is a high degree of volatility in voting patterns (such as 2015 and a referendum, which is essentially an unknown quantity) uncertainties in corrections for voter turnout etc will be a lot more uncertain. Until things settle down again I think they're going to continue to be pretty inaccurate, this election will probably be even worse than the last one due to brexit and all of the various tactical voting strategies which may be employed.


Tory or not, their plans for Internet regulations look terrifying.  It's a continuation from the slippery slope they recently started on down. 

How this appeals to anyone, let alone the politically incorrect types that swarmed to UKIP and are now drifting to the Tories, I do not know.

Not going to lie I actually agree with a lot that's in their manifesto. Some of the motivations behind this are good in my opinion, especially with regards to ensuring news companies get a fair share of advertising revenue. Whether the cure is worse than the disease though is another question (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/theresa-may-internet-conservatives-government-a7744176.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-38333249).

Still not voting for them, ironically because this election is essentially about brexit and i think her strategy here has some serious flaws.

Yeah, but I'm clearly not talking about news organisations collecting a fair share of advertising revenue.  It's about a continuation from the Investigatory Powers Act, their lack of logic when it comes to these things.

Quote
The new rules would include laws that make it harder than ever to access pornographic and other websites. The government will be able to place restrictions on seeing adult content and any exceptions would have to be justified to ministers, the manifesto suggests.

There's also the precedent of it all.  The Tories may not go on to abuse these new powers and proposed powers, but they can and, ultimately, someone will.  We already heard Cameron et all talking about how subversive and destructive conspiratorial websites are, with some mentioning that it should be banned.  They can now do stuff like this, if they win and follow what they've proposed.  That's also ignoring the fact a British conservative Internet sounds like the stuff of nightmares.  And boredom. 

No one is going to argue against rhetoric condemning online bullying, abuse etc, but pretending regulating the internet is going to sort that out is fantasy land stuff.  Deal with the root causes. 

Well yes that does sound pretty worrying.

Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20223 on: Friday 19 May 2017, 05:34:34 PM »
It may turn out they learned a lot from their miscalculations, I've no doubt the bloke is competent enough at his job.

A good insight into the 2015 polling methodology errors:

https://www.spectator.co.uk/2015/05/how-did-the-polls-get-it-so-wrong-jim-messina-knows/

BlufPurdi

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Re: UK Politics: General Election 2017 - 8th of June
« Reply #20224 on: Saturday 20 May 2017, 09:44:11 AM »
Fallon has nightmare interview, says immigration target 'just an ambition', not a word heard anywhere. 
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