Author Topic: The Great Outdoors  (Read 91186 times)

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OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1375 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 02:54:14 PM »
As ever in Scotland, the weather is everything tbh :)

I have a particular soft spot for Glen Torridon which I think is the single most spectacular part of Scotland.  There's a walk which I would say is easy but which is still three to four hours and with appreciably tiring ascents, which starts halfway down that glen, climbs between the feet of Liathach and Beinn Eighe and skirts around the base of Beinn Eighe to a place called Coire Mhic Fhearchair.

It's a very difficult place to photograph successfully (I've managed once or twice) because it's North facing so it's generally either in shadow or the sun is trying to spoil your shot, but it's a seriously majestic location with genuine high mountain ambience and the walk to it is in some of the best scenery in Scotland.  You'll find plenty of route descriptions online (including my own here).

On Skye, the walk up to The Old Man Of Storr and slightly past it to get the classic view back to it with the sea and the west coast in the background is well worth it - again, it's potentially a tiring ascent for people not used to hillwalking but it's well worth the effort.



Elgol beach and the Quiraing are also must-see's for me.









Will think of some more, but those two stand out in terms of (landscape) photography trips

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1376 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 03:03:19 PM »
Really appreciate that mate  O0


Storr was the one thing I really wanted to see last time so it was the first on my list this time round, I don't know much else about Skye but if there's other photogenic places and some decent places to stay that could well be a place to end the day at.

OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1377 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 03:15:44 PM »
Christ, Skye is incredible full stop - on the right sort of day :)  The Quiraing is a landslip on the same range as the Storr so you can do them both in a loop.  Elgol is also on Skye looking over at the Cuillins; the view of Blaven over Loch Slapin on the way is also phenomenal.  The view of the other side of the Cuillins from Sligachan on the way up to Portree is similarly amazing.  If you're looking to stay on Skye, I personally would recommend staying around Broadford rather than Portree further North.  I've only ever stayed in the Youth Hostel though, so can't help you with accommodation :)

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1378 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 03:30:38 PM »
I mean I thought Skye might be more than just Storr like  [emoji38]

Quiraing looks amazing, and Google maps says just over an hours drive from Broadford to there which is ideal. Think that's one day of the trip sorted!

OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1379 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 03:35:23 PM »

:thup:

My number one recommendation is, before you head off, learn how to make the most of cloudy days :lol:  It's what I've spent the last ten years trying to perfect, because it's what you get more often than not.  Cloudy shots with no sunlight have an authentically British look which I personally find very appealing :)

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1380 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 03:42:05 PM »
We were incredibly lucky with the weather last time, I doubt we'll be that lucky again. I guess the nd grads will help somewhat with the days where the light is a bit flat, not sure my new 2 stop soft grad will suffice so I might be 'forced' into buying more kit  :)

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1381 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 04:54:26 PM »
Think I better stop looking for places on Skye to photograph, already got

Old Man of Storr
Quiraing
Elgol Beach
Fairy Pools
Sligachan Old Bridge
Neist Point Lighthouse

This trip could end up being a month long, might just quit work  :lol:

OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1382 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 05:10:35 PM »
Fairy Pools are disappointing tbh (imo) but the beach at the end of Glen Brittle is lovely.  The lighthouse is great though :thup: two days of traveling to get round all those and spend some time though imo, the miles are not so long but the roads are not so good and it's always really busy.
« Last Edit: Saturday 18 February 2017, 06:16:09 PM by OpenC »

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1383 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 09:36:02 PM »
Just logged in, OC never tire of seeing those photographs of Elgol beach, superb, never actually been there myself but will do one day.

In relation to the question could I make a few suggestions

First one is a lochside track from Kinlochourn which is a strenuous 6 mile trek to Barrisdale bay. Might be a bit long but in the right conditions such as autumn it would be awesome



.

Second would be a 3 mile trek from Aberarder farm on the A86 into Coire Ardair. The first shows the coire from above. Its a fairly level trek into the coire, you can see the end of the trek at the lochan. The other is one of the "posts" above the lochan. Admittedly these are late winter photos but you can see the shape of the place. Its an awesome place





 

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1384 on: Saturday 18 February 2017, 09:53:37 PM »
Thanks snoop, I shall study those tomorrow  O0

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1385 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 03:45:37 PM »
I'm trying to find a decent B&B or hotel to stay at for the end of the first day somewhere between Loch Lomond and Glencoe, any ideas?

I'd really like to photograph Glencoe so ideally any stopover would be closer to there than Loch Lomond, as we'd then be heading to Skye for day 2 and part of day 3.

I just don't know where to start looking!


OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1386 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 04:02:41 PM »
Should be something in Crianlarich or Tyndrum or Glencoe/Ballachulish.  Never stayed anywhere so I can't recommend, but I don't think you'll struggle to find anything :thup:

BTW, Coire Ardair is in the Glencoe/Fort William area and is a half day hike so if you're considering it (you should, it's amazing), you might need to adjust your plans unless you're stopping again on the way back down.
« Last Edit: Sunday 19 February 2017, 05:14:45 PM by OpenC »

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1387 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 04:18:55 PM »
Got a trip planned up the Kilham Hill trail tomorrow. :)
"Elsewhere, at worst, modern commercial football could be seen as the mall rather than the circus; insidiously bland, decaffeinated and pre-packed, its relentless formulaic repetition an instrument for disabling consciousness rather than manipulating it."

David Goldblatt

OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1388 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 04:59:05 PM »
Got my lass to drop me off five miles up the road this morning and am just back from a roundly satisfying 15 mile meander back, taking in the northern hills of Thrunton Woods, Cartington Hill, the Debdon estate, a possibly slightly trespassy look up through Cragside estate to the lakes, then out at the far end and a wander back to my hometown, out on the edge of the prairie (reference for very few or no readers there) via the public footpaths across the fields.

Will post some pictures later; no staggering views but the walk really demonstrated how much Northumberland has to offer to the walker.  The only terrain I missed was beaches and high mountains, pretty much everything else was covered - forests, woods, open moorland, hills, lakes, fields and grassy riverside haughs. Loved it, both the navigational challenge and the freedom to go wherever I liked within the constraints of my own endurance.

Was around 24km and 1km ascent, and took a shade under seven hours.  Slowed considerably by a path through tangled heather which was definitely on the map not existing on the ground :)
« Last Edit: Sunday 19 February 2017, 05:11:25 PM by OpenC »

OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1389 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 07:02:27 PM »
The aforementioned not-very-interesting pictures.  Walks don't always have to be spectacular, though :)

Thrunton Woods, beloved of dog walkers from around my way, as well as mountain bikers and horse riders.  After about half an hour, I was able to slip through a little-used gate in a wall to reach..


..Castle Hill, a strange old place with huge and presumably fairly ancient trees growing out of the crags.


A steep descent from Castle Hill and similarly steep reascent on the other side passes this strange little cave, almost exactly big enough for a single person to comfortably sit in.  Bizarre.  The woods past this point are natural rather than being planted for profit, and are much more pleasant to walk through.


That said, woods are my least favourite thing to walk through (what with them looking pretty much all the same - just loads of trees, really, aren't they) so I was pleased to reach the end and start seeing glimpses of the Cheviots to the North, albeit under cloud.




The open moorland at the end of the woods was boggy and purgatorial, there's no other way to put it.  A path through the heather which I'd been counting on failed to materialise, so there was no option but to just stomp through it, bog and all.  Lola was not keen on this bit..


I found this wall but still no traces of a path.  It looked like it was heading basically where I wanted to go, so I just followed it down.


After 45 minutes floundering around in heather and bog, a bulldozed track like this one is a pleasure to behold (which isn't something I say very often, as a fan of an unspoiled outdoors).  You can see the path continuing to Cartington Hill in the distance.  I didn't end up using the bulldozed track; there was an easy alternative through the grass to the left.


Have very rarely been so pleased to finally find a Public Footpath sign :)


Hedgehope coming out in the distance beyond the small cottage/shooting lodge/bothy of Sunbrough.


The view back to the Cheviots from just past the summit of Cartington Hill


Looking the other way from Cartington Hill; that road leads to Debdon and my feet were soaking by here so I couldn't wait to get stood on it.  I met a couple - the first people I had seen other than a solitary dude in the distance wandering along the Southern hills of Thrunton Woods - and discussed routes and conditions and just how great Northumberland is in general for ten minutes before I pushed on toward the Debdon estate.


The immensely pleasing road to Debdon


From Debdon I crossed the main road into Rothbury and headed into the Cragside estate.  Knowing that I wanted to come out at the far end, I climbed all the way to the top of the estate and went past the two big lakes on the top.  Also an opportunity to clean and water the dog :)  She didn't enjoy Cragside much given that it was all road work so she had to be on her lead, which she's alright with but doesn't really enjoy


A long, long walk through Cragside and a steep descent down a crag to the now-reopened road which the townies use to get to Rothbury brought me to the farm at Crag End.  I was starting to feel it by now and was running low on water so was pleased to see this


Simonside looking moody in the other direction


A traditional Northumbrian public footpath through close-fitting gorse and bramble


So! Very! Close!


Outstanding feeling to finally get onto the same screen as your home town :lol:  Also Cockshot LOL


And, just a mile from home, a heaven-sent rain pond to clean the dog up (she got filthy again before we got back, like)


Was weary by the time I got back but it was great to just be able to sit down outside and get a beer rather than have to think about a four hour drive home :)


OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1390 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 07:06:16 PM »
Route was long enough to be better viewed on the transport map :lol:



This might give it some context, although obviously there's a good deal of difference between road walking and picking your way over rough moorland
Spoiler

« Last Edit: Monday 20 February 2017, 07:35:26 AM by OpenC »

neesy111

  • Prontonise
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1391 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 07:32:06 PM »
Just watched a program on iplayer about the lake district, worth a watch.

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1392 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 07:36:07 PM »

Route was long enough to be better viewed on the transport map :lol:



That's a proper walk! Bet you're planning the next one already?

OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1393 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 07:41:59 PM »
Am i f***, I'm sitting around moaning about having sore legs and wondering why I bother [emoji38]

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1394 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 07:45:15 PM »
 :lol:

OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1395 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 08:37:45 PM »
Got a trip planned up the Kilham Hill trail tomorrow. :)

Just seen this. Enjoy :thup: looks a steep little pull

Forecast for this neck of the woods has taken a turn for the worse, looks like you might be better timing it for the afternoon.. shouldn't take much more than a couple of hours max looking at the route, although of course it'll depend on fitness and stopping for pictures :) don't set out at 3pm and curse as the daylight begins to disappear [emoji38]
« Last Edit: Sunday 19 February 2017, 09:05:18 PM by OpenC »

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1396 on: Sunday 19 February 2017, 10:37:44 PM »
Cheers for the heads up on the weather as we had planned on going up in the morning as the forecast did look ok the last time that I'd checked.

We'll probably head off around 11ish.

Camera bag is all prepped.
"Elsewhere, at worst, modern commercial football could be seen as the mall rather than the circus; insidiously bland, decaffeinated and pre-packed, its relentless formulaic repetition an instrument for disabling consciousness rather than manipulating it."

David Goldblatt

Jimburst

  • Yeah Buddy!
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1397 on: Monday 20 February 2017, 05:10:56 AM »
Currently residing in New Zealand. Hell, this place makes you become an absolute fiend for the great outdoors. Everyone is involved in outdoor sports, grannies riding MTB's, Granda's scaling volcanoes, it's so refreshing to see so many people out and about all the time.

Reckon I'll stick some photos up in the Photo Thread, actually.
A splatterhouse turd done in the manky toilets of a discotheque, brought on my the consumption of cowies or toot.

OpenC

  • You might still see them in the desert
Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1398 on: Monday 20 February 2017, 05:03:34 PM »
Cheers for the heads up on the weather as we had planned on going up in the morning as the forecast did look ok the last time that I'd checked.

We'll probably head off around 11ish.

Camera bag is all prepped.

Well, I've been cautiously looking out of the window all day and it definitely cheered up about 1PM when Cheviot and Hedgehope both emerged from the murk.. although I suspect it's been a bit blowy up there, unless you were in the lee of bigger hills.  I hope you had a good one :thup:

Re: The Great Outdoors
« Reply #1399 on: Monday 20 February 2017, 05:05:54 PM »
Ended up not doing the exact walk as the instructions on the route map were absolutely s****, so didn't get to the top unfortunately.

Definitely going to go back and do it though, just going to try and find out a bit more due to the official instructions being garbage.
"Elsewhere, at worst, modern commercial football could be seen as the mall rather than the circus; insidiously bland, decaffeinated and pre-packed, its relentless formulaic repetition an instrument for disabling consciousness rather than manipulating it."

David Goldblatt