Author Topic: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space  (Read 56160 times)

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LBW

  • TPFKA lankybellwipe
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #25 on: Wednesday 8 December 2010, 11:03:40 PM »
Nah, we can't be alone, man. It's too big.

I'm in full agreement with that Mike, but I fear the chances of any intelligent being(s) reaching our planet and returning home with a scrapbook/invasion documentation before pension books are posted, to be somewhat slim. Slimmer in fact than me. And I would say that's impossible!!
"You're giving ME the 'it's naat you it's me' routine? If it's anybaady, it's ME!!"
"Ok George, it's YOU!"
"You're DAMN RIGHT IT'S ME!"

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #26 on: Wednesday 8 December 2010, 11:06:13 PM »
Probably. I mean, we're really f***ing small. Probably wouldn't be able to find us if you weren't looking for us.

Yorkie

  • C'mTA
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #27 on: Wednesday 8 December 2010, 11:40:07 PM »
As disappointing as that NASA press conference was, the news astronomically improves the chances of there being other life. There has to be.

Dave

  • Administrator
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #28 on: Wednesday 8 December 2010, 11:46:16 PM »
As if that wasn't already the case though.

Yorkie

  • C'mTA
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #29 on: Thursday 9 December 2010, 05:20:55 AM »
What's frustrating is that it probably makes it even harder to find life, or traces of life. I'm surprised NASA were as narrow-minded to think extra-terrestrials would comply to Earth's perameters. The universe is colossal, we don't know what the hell's out there.

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #30 on: Thursday 9 December 2010, 06:47:00 AM »
What's frustrating is that it probably makes it even harder to find life, or traces of life. I'm surprised NASA were as narrow-minded to think extra-terrestrials would comply to Earth's perameters. The universe is colossal, we don't know what the hell's out there.

Yes and no. There's a pretty good understanding out there of chemistry, which helps confine the forms that life can take. There's a good reason why astrobiologists look for signs of water, for example, as well as reasons they look for signs of carbon.
"Whenever I have a nightmare it isn't in colour.  It's always black and white, the colours of the meanest, toughest  club ever to run on to a football field.  Collingwood.  I've laboured the point of my hatred of Collingwood and it isn't a friendly dislike - as a club they rankle me.  You couldn't like them, they think they are God's gift to football, they shun all outsiders and the only time I like to think of Collingwood is when they lose, because it hurts them so much. I've always been a bad loser, but I'm a good sport compared to Collingwood.  If they win they gloat, if they lose they hide themselves away and sulk.  When they lose they never visit your rooms or congratulate you and they'll send you round hot beer to have a drink.  I wouldn't drink anything they offered, you wouldn't know what they had done to it." Jack 'Captain Blood' Dyer.

ObiChrisKenobi

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #31 on: Monday 13 December 2010, 11:11:49 PM »
http://io9.com/5713105/watch-an-entire-hemisphere-of-the-sun-explode

Quote
In this ultraviolet light video taken by NASA, you can watch a phenomenon that scientists didn't believe could exist until a few months ago. An entire hemisphere of the sun explodes, one region igniting another. What does this discovery mean?

It turns out that the sun doesn't just spurt out gouts of gas in isolated spots. In fact, our star's magnetic field brings many regions of Sol's surface into direct relationships with each other, so areas separated by millions of miles can literally spark each other up. The results are called "sympathetic flares."

Holy s***!

LiquidAK

  • I wanna evade my thoughts, I wanna die in Kyoto.
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #32 on: Tuesday 14 December 2010, 02:39:28 AM »
I read in 'The God Delusion' that there are approximately a billion billion planets in the universe (best estimate, I guess). That means that even if life is as incredibly rare that it only occurs on 1 in every 1 billion planets, there are still a billion planets with life out there. That was pretty mindblowing for me to think about.

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #33 on: Tuesday 14 December 2010, 02:42:55 AM »
I read in 'The God Delusion' that there are approximately a billion billion planets in the universe (best estimate, I guess). That means that even if life is as incredibly rare that it only occurs on 1 in every 1 billion planets, there are still a billion planets with life out there. That was pretty mindblowing for me to think about.

Good book, that. Big fan of Dicky Dawkins.
"Whenever I have a nightmare it isn't in colour.  It's always black and white, the colours of the meanest, toughest  club ever to run on to a football field.  Collingwood.  I've laboured the point of my hatred of Collingwood and it isn't a friendly dislike - as a club they rankle me.  You couldn't like them, they think they are God's gift to football, they shun all outsiders and the only time I like to think of Collingwood is when they lose, because it hurts them so much. I've always been a bad loser, but I'm a good sport compared to Collingwood.  If they win they gloat, if they lose they hide themselves away and sulk.  When they lose they never visit your rooms or congratulate you and they'll send you round hot beer to have a drink.  I wouldn't drink anything they offered, you wouldn't know what they had done to it." Jack 'Captain Blood' Dyer.

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #34 on: Tuesday 14 December 2010, 07:48:51 AM »
Voyager near Solar System's edge

Voyager 1, the most distant spacecraft from Earth, has reached a new milestone in its quest to leave the Solar System.

Now 17.4bn km (10.8bn miles) from home, the veteran probe has detected a distinct change in the flow of particles that surround it.

These particles, which emanate from the Sun, are no longer travelling outwards but are moving sideways.

It means Voyager must be very close to making the jump to interstellar space - the space between the stars.

Edward Stone, the Voyager project scientist, lauded the explorer and the fascinating science it continues to return 33 years after launch.

"When Voyager was launched, the space age itself was only 20 years old, so there was no basis to know that spacecraft could last so long," he told BBC News.

"We had no idea how far we would have to travel to get outside the Solar System. We now know that in roughly five years, we should be outside for the first time."

Dr Stone was speaking here at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, the largest gathering of Earth scientists in the world.

Particle bubble

Voyager 1 was launched on 5 September 1977, and its sister spacecraft, Voyager 2, on 20 August 1977.

The Nasa probes' initial goal was to survey the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, a task completed in 1989.

They were then despatched towards deep space, in the general direction of the centre of our Milky Way Galaxy.

Sustained by their radioactive power packs, the probes' instruments continue to function well and return data to Earth, although the vast distance between them and Earth means a radio message now has a travel time of about 16 hours.

The newly reported observation comes from Voyager 1's Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument, which has been monitoring the velocity of the solar wind.

This stream of charged particles forms a bubble around our Solar System known as the heliosphere. The wind travels at "supersonic" speed until it crosses a shockwave called the termination shock.

At this point, the wind then slows dramatically and heats up in a region termed the heliosheath. Voyager has determined the velocity of the wind at its location has now slowed to zero.

Racing onwards

"We have gotten to the point where the wind from the Sun, which until now has always had an outward motion, is no longer moving outward; it is only moving sideways so that it can end up going down the tail of the heliosphere, which is a comet-shaped-like object," said Dr Stone, who is based at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California.

This phenomenon is a consequence of the wind pushing up against the matter coming from other stars. The boundary between the two is the "official" edge of the Solar System - the heliopause. Once Voyager crosses over, it will be in interstellar space.

First hints that Voyager had encountered something new came in June. Several months of further data were required to confirm the observation.

"When I realized that we were getting solid zeroes, I was amazed," said Rob Decker, a Voyager Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument co-investigator from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland.

"Here was Voyager, a spacecraft that has been a workhorse for 33 years, showing us something completely new again."

Voyager is racing on towards the heliopause at 17km/s. Dr Stone expects the cross-over to occur within the next few years.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-11988466
“What is a club in any case? Not the buildings or the directors or the people who are paid to represent it. It’s not the television contracts, get-out clauses, marketing departments or executive boxes. It’s the noise, the passion, the feeling of belonging, the pride in your city. It’s a small boy clambering up stadium steps for the very first time, gripping his father’s hand, gawping at that hallowed stretch of turf beneath him and, without being able to do a thing about it, falling in love.” - Sir Bobby Robson

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #35 on: Wednesday 15 December 2010, 08:53:54 PM »
Big year next year for space and stuff. Stay frosty.

ObiChrisKenobi

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #36 on: Wednesday 15 December 2010, 09:25:49 PM »
Big year next year for space and stuff. Stay frosty.

Well share the knowledge, man.

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #37 on: Thursday 16 December 2010, 11:25:48 AM »
So all the NASA stuff from last week- the arsenic based life- has been called into question. Apparently the study was pretty poor, and a lot of people are calling into question the peer-review process in that case.
"Whenever I have a nightmare it isn't in colour.  It's always black and white, the colours of the meanest, toughest  club ever to run on to a football field.  Collingwood.  I've laboured the point of my hatred of Collingwood and it isn't a friendly dislike - as a club they rankle me.  You couldn't like them, they think they are God's gift to football, they shun all outsiders and the only time I like to think of Collingwood is when they lose, because it hurts them so much. I've always been a bad loser, but I'm a good sport compared to Collingwood.  If they win they gloat, if they lose they hide themselves away and sulk.  When they lose they never visit your rooms or congratulate you and they'll send you round hot beer to have a drink.  I wouldn't drink anything they offered, you wouldn't know what they had done to it." Jack 'Captain Blood' Dyer.

Dave

  • Administrator
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #38 on: Wednesday 23 March 2011, 10:24:04 PM »


Truly amazing stuff. 720p and full screen it.

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #39 on: Wednesday 23 March 2011, 10:39:33 PM »
If that's one of those videos that will make my brain hurt I'm not watching it.
Before that why didn't the Wigan fans just walk the the Stewart's, the Stewart's only went up to the touchline, their was a big gap between the end of the Stewart's and the stand they could have walked through.
God man replacement's don't have to 100% of best to 100% of a replacement.
The are both white, both intellects, both middle class, both the typical 'people who would have thought could never do such a thing ', all traits of a Psychopath.

Troll

  • Book Wanker
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #40 on: Wednesday 23 March 2011, 10:40:47 PM »
As disappointing as that NASA press conference was, the news astronomically improves the chances of there being other life. There has to be.

The paper that press conference was referring to got ripped to shreds by plenty of scientists in the week or so after it was published.

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #41 on: Wednesday 23 March 2011, 10:43:51 PM »
God I love space.

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #42 on: Wednesday 23 March 2011, 10:44:17 PM »
"Elsewhere, at worst, modern commercial football could be seen as the mall rather than the circus; insidiously bland, decaffeinated and pre-packed, its relentless formulaic repetition an instrument for disabling consciousness rather than manipulating it."

David Goldblatt

LiquidAK

  • I wanna evade my thoughts, I wanna die in Kyoto.
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #43 on: Wednesday 23 March 2011, 11:40:41 PM »


Truly amazing stuff. 720p and full screen it.

Oh s***, son.

Dr Venkman

  • Alreet pet?
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #44 on: Wednesday 23 March 2011, 11:44:24 PM »

And strangely, there seems to be some giant Dark Object outside the solar system throwing things into our solar system! Daily Mail ran the story, so imagine they're claiming its an illegal immigrant planet trying to sneak into our garden to leach of the 'system'. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1336540/Massive-dark-object-lurking-edge-solar-hurling-comets-Earth.html

Other people suggest its the mysterious Nibiru planet, the planet that's due to kill us all off in 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nibiru_collision


Quote
The idea that a planet-sized object could possibly collide with or pass by Earth in the near future is not supported by any scientific evidence

 :lol:

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #45 on: Wednesday 23 March 2011, 11:55:14 PM »
It's very well put together. Great watch :) Right up my street.

When I'm looking a nebula it's mental to think of the size of what I'm seeing. And the fact you can see certain galaxies with the naked eye. :cheesy:

The scale of the things out there is definitely hurty head time lol

Here's one for scale of certain planets and stars in our own Galaxy and beyond. Pretty interesting. Puts that programme Big Bigger and Biggest to shame :D

Never look down on someone, unless you're helping them up!

Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #46 on: Wednesday 23 March 2011, 11:59:13 PM »
:lol: Never get tired of that one.

Neil

  • The stretched twig of peace is at melting point
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #47 on: Thursday 24 March 2011, 12:35:44 AM »
Aye, I never tire of watching that video.

It's astonishing, it really is. We simply can't be the only form of life, man.
Thomas the Tank Engine is a f***ing c***.

ope

  • palnese
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #48 on: Thursday 24 March 2011, 12:42:48 AM »


Truly amazing stuff. 720p and full screen it.

Oh s***, son.

That is astonishing. We are deffo not alone, like.
Man United haven't had this much of a squad overhaul since 1958

Could it have feasibly climbed high enough to leave the atmosphere? ???

Neil

  • The stretched twig of peace is at melting point
Re: Intergalactic Cosmic Space Thread about Stuff in Space
« Reply #49 on: Thursday 24 March 2011, 12:45:24 AM »
Did the old 720p/full screen job on that video, Dave. Absolutely superb, and thought-provoking viewing. It's just mind-blowing stuff.
Thomas the Tank Engine is a f***ing c***.